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Full text of "A bibliography of Oliver Wendell Holmes"

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A BIBLIOGRAPHY 
OF 

OLIVER WENDELL HOLMES 




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A BIBLIOGRAPHY OF 

OLIVER WENDELL HOLMES 

COMPILED BY GEORGE B. IVES 




BOSTON AND NEW YORK 

HOUGHTON, MIFFLIN AND COMPANY 

MDCCCCVII 



COPYRIGHT 1907 BY HOUGHTON, MIFFLIN & CO. 
ALL RIGHTS RESERVED 

FIVE HUNDRED AND THIRTY COPIES PRINTED 

NUMBER ff 



PREFACE 

"Des communications et des rencontres, voila ce qui 
arrive a tout lexicographe en quete de materiaux," wrote 
Littre by way of introduction to the third supplement to 
his great dictionary. With the substitution of a word the 
observation will apply with equal force to one in quest of 
material for the bibliography of an author so prolific as 
Dr. Holmes in "occasional" prose as well as verse. The 
compiler of this volume early abandoned all hope of 
achieving completeness, even before he was warned by one 
who knew whereof he spoke that he had undertaken a 
"supernatural" task. He has finally become convinced 
that, no matter how long the book may be withheld from 
the press, there will be no end to the "communications 
and discoveries ; " the Appendix contains those which have 
come to hand since the pages were made up, and which 
it was impossible to incorporate in the text. 

The general arrangement of the bibliography is sub- 
stantially the same as that adopted by Mr. Cooke in his 
Bibliography of Lowell. 

I. A Chronological List of Titles, accompanied by page 
references. This list is extended to include the more im- 
portant volumes in which some of Dr. Holmes's works are 
printed in conjunction with the work of other writers. 

II. An Alphabetical List of Single Works. This list has 
been extended by the necessity of introducing a large num- 
ber of cross-references. So many poems written for special 
occasions have never received any distinguishing titles, and 
are printed in the collections simply as "Songs," "Poems," 
or "Hymns," that it is not easy to find any particular one 
without the aid of a cross-reference. Again, a number of 
the poems, especially the earlier ones, were originally pub- 



[vi] 

lishcd under different titles from those whicli they now 
l)ear, and a complete list must necessarily include both. 

In searching for unpublished matter in the periodicals 
and "Annuals" of the years between Dr. Holmes's gradua- 
tion and the publication of his first volume of poems (1836), 
the compiler remembered a passage in a letter to Phineas 
Barnes, quoted by Mr. Morse, in his biography of Dr. 
Holmes : ^ "By the way, if you find any floating scraps with 
O. \Y. II. to the tail of them, set them down to the owner 
and, I believe, the only one, of those preposterous initials." 
In this way he was able to fix the original appearance of 
some, even of the acknowledged poems, which the careful 
editor of the Cambridge Edition had failed to place. The 
purpose has been to give, so far as possible, in connection 
with each item : — 

1. Particulars as to its first appearance in print. 

2. If it first appeared elsewhere than in a bound volume, 
the title and date of publication of such volume in which 
it was first printed, if at all. 

3. Its first appearance in a volume of Dr. Holmes's col- 
lected works. 

In some special cases further details are given; and 
when it has come to the compiler's knowledge that a poem 
was printed in the form of a leaflet, or broadside, for dis- 
tribution on the "occasion" for which it was written, or 
for any other purpose, that fact also is noted. Such print- 
ings are, in the eye of the collector, first editions, and are 
prized accordingly. 

Unfortunately, for the purposes of the bibliographer, at 
least, there is no possibility of identifying Dr. Holmes's 
earhest original works. His own statements on the subject 
are not illuminating. In the "Autobiographical Notes" 
printed by Mr. Morse,^ he says, "I have often been asked 
what were the first verses I printed. I can't be quite certain 
on this point; but of one thing I am quite certain, that, so 
far as I know, no vestige of talent is found in any one of 
' Vol. i, p. 71. ? Vol. i, p. 47. 



[vii] 

them." And in the letter to Mr. John O. Sargent of Feb. 19, 
1878, accompanying the famous sonnets written for the 
anniversary of the Harvard Club of New York: "May I 
venture to remind you, Mr. President, that it is nearly 
fifty years since you, as Editor of a College Magazine, gave 
a kindly welcome to the earliest printed verses known as 
coming from my pen?" The reference is, of course, to 
the Collegian, and perhaps the qualifying phrase, "known 
as coming from my pen." may reconcile it with the following 
passage of a letter to Phineas Barnes, written in March, 
18£8, fifty years earlier, while Holmes was still an under- 
graduate at Harvard: "I smoke most devoutly, and sing 
most unmusically, have written poetry for an AiAiual, and 
seen my literary bantlings swathed in green silk and repos- 
ing in the drawing-room." ^ Thus far no one has succeeded 
in discovering an "Annual" bound in green silk, of a suf- 
ficiently early date to meet the requirements of this allusion, 
although some of those who have been interested enough to 
follow it up, have thought that th^ detected Dr. Holmes's 
hand in different poems in the Token for 1828 and 1829. 

It is certain, however, that he was the author of two 
poems which were composed and delivered during the year 
1829, but of which neither, in all likelihood, was ever 
printed. On July 14, Class Day, Holmes "delivered a hu- 
morous and characteristic poem, the chief objection to which 
was its brevity." Such is the record of the Secretary of the 
Class of 1829; ^ and Mr. Lowell, in his article on Class 
Day for the Harvard Book,^ quotes the diary of the Rev. 
George Whitney of Roxbury with respect to this Class 
Day of 1829 as follows:— 

* Morse, vol. i, p. 55. 

' The compiler cannot adequately express his regret that, under the 
conditions governing the deposit in the Library of Harvard College of the 
absolutely unique volume containing the records of the famous Class, as 
kept for sixty years by the Secretary, Mr. Samuel May, he is unable to 
draw upon it for material which would add immeasurably to the interest 
of this work. It is occasionally referred to as authority for some fact for 
which there is no other authority. 

8 Cambridge, 1875, vol. ii, p. 165. 



[ viii ] 

"Ilis [Holmes's] poem was very happy and abounded in 
wit. Instead of a spiritual muse he invoked for his goddesses 
the ladies present, and in so doing he sang very amusingly 
of his * hapless amour with too tall a maid.'" 

Again, at Commencement, we have, in addition to the 
Class records, the testimony of Rev. John Pierce of the 
Class of 1793, in his diary, that "Holmes gave much delight 
in a poem without a subject." ^ 

It is probable that the poem printed, under the title 
"Banditti," in the New England Galaxy early in 1830, and 
reprinted under the same title, in the same year, in the 
Gleaner, is the earliest production of Dr. Holmes's of which 
we can be absolutely sure. It is familiar to all readers under 
the title "The Music-Grinders." 

III. A Chronological List of Single Publications. 

Beginning with the Harbinger, in which seventeen of Dr. 
Holmes's poems, all of which save one ^ had been previously 
printed, in various periodicals and annuals, were "col- 
lected," an attempt has been made to include all the import- 
ant editions, at least, of each successive publication of Dr. 
Holmes. Recourse has been had to the Library of Harvard 
College, the Boston Public Library, the Boston Athenaeum, 
and the Boston Medical Library; also to the Library of 
Congress, and, lastly, to the Catalogue of Printed Books 
in the British Museum. As to the last-named authority, 
the compiler feels bound to say that he is not altogether 
satisfied as to the extraordinary number of editions of vari- 
ous works said to have been issued by Messrs. Routledge, 
most of which are given in the Appendix. 

In this list only those separate issues of individual poems 

* Proceedings of the Massachusetts Historical Society, 2d series, vol. 5, 
p. 200. Extracts from Mr. Pierce's diary have been published at intervals 
by the Society. See under " Poetry: a Metrical Essay" and "The Pil- 
grim's Vision." 

2 " The Dying Seneca." It probably had been printed elsewhere, but 
has not been discovered. 



[ix] 

are included which seem to have been printed with some 
idea of permanence. 

IV. Selections and Compilations. 

This list has been extended somewhat beyond its natural 
intent, in order to give, in conjunction with that immediately 
preceding, prominent position to every book (not including 
periodicals, or reports of proceedings on special occasions) 
in which any work of Dr. Holmes was first printed. 

V. Letters. 

VI. Contributions to the Atlantic Monthly. 

The foregoing lists are intended to include, in some 
form, mention of everything written by Dr. Holmes. Those 
which follow represent the compiler's endeavors to collect 
what has been written about him and his work. 

I. Biographies, including a list of bibliographies, of 
which only those of Mr. Foley, Mr. Arnold, and Mr. Ken- 
nedy ^ deserve special mention. None of these were pub- 
lished separately. 

II. List of books and articles of which the authors are 
known, arranged alphabetically by the authors' names. 

III. Chronological List of anonymous articles. 

As to the last two lists, the compiler regrets that it was 
impracticable, without extending them beyond measure, to 
indicate, except in rare instances, the comparative import- 
ance of the works enumerated. Many would have been 
omitted except for his reluctance to attempt to discriminate. 

IV. Poems. 

The volume closes with a list of sales at auction. Even a 
cursory examination will show how unreliable such sales 
are in fixing the value of any particular volume; for the 
prices obtained are not only influenced by considerations 
of sentiment and association, but vary mysteriously accord- 
* In his Life of Holmes. 



[X] 

ing to the dates of the various sales, and, to some extent, 
according to the names of the owners of the volumes sold. 

If he has fallen far short of completeness, the compiler 
ventures to hope that his work will, at least, be found to be 
free from serious errors, although there may be occasional 
inconsistencies in the arrangement of material. To remedy 
this defect so far as possible, and to direct attention to 
the miscellaneous items of information which are scattered 
through the various lists and to which neither alphabetical 
nor chronological arrangement gives a clue, an index has 
been added. It does not pretend to be exhaustive, or to 
be arranged on any scientific plan, but it is hoped that it 
may measurably serve the purpose indicated. 

The compiler is glad to acknowledge his indebtedness to 
Mr. Charles Albert Read, of the Harvard Librar}% for val- 
uable assistance in collecting material, especially data of 
magazine articles and other works concerning Dr. Holmes ; 
to Miss Annie L. Sinclair, of the Library of Congress at 
Washington, for descriptions of editions of Dr. Holmes's 
works other than those issued by his authorized publishers; 
and to Mr. James F.Ballard, of the Boston Medical Library, 
for courteous and willing cooperation in his investigations 
there. He is also under great obligation to Mr. Justice 
Holmes for memoranda relating to certain editions in his 
library, of which he has obtained no information from any 
other source. Mr. Luther S. Livingston, in addition to his 
generous assistance, acknowledged elsewhere, in connection 
with the record of auction sales for 1905-06, has very kindly 
furnished bibliographical material which has made it pos- 
sible to add considerably to the list of volumes contain- 
ing letters of Dr. Holmes; and Mr. Patrick Kevin Foley, 
with the most unselfish and hearty good-will, has supplied 
valuable information and suggestions which are gratefully 
acknowledged. Thanks are due also to Mr. George Blatch- 
ford, of Pittsfield, and to the family of the late Mr. J. E. A. 
Smith, for their generous permission to print those of the 



[xi] 

"Berkshire poems" of Dr. Holmes, which were first pub- 
lished in Mr. Smith's "The Poet among the Hills;" also 
to Dr. James Jackson Putnam for permission to print the 
verses to Dr. James Jackson on his eightieth birthday. 

Mrs. J. Chester Chamberlain, of New York, has, with the 
utmost courtesy and kindness, supplied descriptions of two 
very rare works, — "New England's Master-Key" and a 
Lecture of 1863, — the only known copies of which are 
in the great collection of the late Mr. Chamberlain, whose 
untimely death in the prime of life and in the midst of a 
career of great usefulness and promise is lamented not by 
collectors alone. The value of this work to those persons to 
whom, if to anybody, it can have value is greatly increased 
by the inclusion of such material. 

Mr. Stephen H. Wakeman, of New York, whose collec- 
tion of works by and concerning the New England group 
of authors is very extensive and complete, kindly allowed 
the compiler to inspect his valuable Holmes collection ; the 
most notable result of that permission is the description of 
the unique "Lecture on the Poetry of the War," of which 
only two copies are known to have been printed. In addi- 
tion to this, however, the compiler is indebted to Mr. Wake- 
man for his knowledge of the existence of a number of 
poems in the shape of separate leaflets, and of the reprint of 
the Atlantic article on Hawthorne in that author's "Pansie; " 
also for the opportunity to inspect the "Verses from the 
Island Book," for copies of the "Prelude" to that volume, 
and of the curious versions of the passage from "The Old 
Player," printed in the Recreations of the Rabelais Club; 
and for much other information which was unobtainable 
elsewhere, all of which is gratefully acknowledged. 

In conclusion the compiler takes the opportunity to say 
that his investigations have satisfied him that collectors 
outside of New England are rapidly acquiring all that is 
most valuable from their standpoint in the way of editions 
and manuscripts of the group of authors to whom that 
section of the country owes its literary prestige. 



CONTENTS 

Chronological List of Dr. Holmes's Works . 1 

Alphabetical List of Single Titles 

I. Poems 3 

II. Prose . . 95 

Chronological List of Single Publications 

I. Poetry 118 

II. Prose . . . . . . . .161 

Collected Works . . . . . . 200 

Selections and Compilations .... 202 

Letters 22Q 

Dr. Holmes's Contributions to the Atlantic 
Monthly 236 

Biography and Criticism 

I. Biographies 243 

Bibliographies ...... 245 

II. Signed Essays, Reviews, etc. . . .246 

III. Essays, Reviews, and other Anonymous 

Articles, arranged in Chronological 
Order 263 

IV. Poems . .275 

Record of Sales at Auction .... 287 
Manuscripts 302 

Appendix 305 

Index 317 



BIBLIOGRAPHY 



CHRONOLOGICAL LIST OF DR. 
HOLMES'S WORKS 

The figures opposite the titles refer to the pages upon which 
the various editions of the respective pubhcations are described. 
The hst includes, besides Dr. Holmes's own publications, the 
most important works of which his contributions form only a 
part of the contents. 

1830. The Collegian 202 

The Gleaner 205 

1833. The Harbinger 118 

1836. The Laurel 206 

Poems 119 

1838. Boylston Prize Dissertations, 1836-1837 161 

1842. Homoeopathy, and its Kindred De- 

lusions 162 

1843. The Contagiousness of Puerperal Fever 162 
1846. Poems, London 123 

Urania: a Rhymed Lesson 125 

1849. Poems 125, 127 

1850. Astrsea: the Balance of Illusions 129 
Dedication of Pittsfield Cemetery 130 

1852. Poems, London 130 

1854. Songs of the Class of 1829 132, 133, 134, 135 

The New Eden 136 

1856. Oration before the New England Society 164 

1858. The Autocrat of the Breakfast-Table 165, 314 

1859. The Promise 136 

1860. The Professor at the Breakfast-Table 171, 315 
Currents and Counter-Currents in Medi- 
cal Science 174 

1861. Currents and Counter-Currents in 

Medical Science, with other Addresses 
and Essays 175 

Elsie Venner 176, 315 

Vive la France 137 

1862. Songs in Many Keys 137 
Poems, Blue and Gold Edition 141 



[2] 

1863. Oration delivered before the City Author- 

ities of Boston, July 4tli . 179 

Lecture 180, 311 

New England's Master-Key 180, 312 

1864. Soundings from the Atlantic 207 

1865. Poetry of the War 180 
Humorous Poems 208 
Verses from the Island Book 207 

1867. The Guardian Angel 181, 316 

1869. History of the American Stereoscope 182 

1871. Mechanism in Thought and Morals 182 

1872. The Claims of Dentistry 183 
The Poet at the Breakfast-Table 183, 316 

1874. Professor Jeffries Wyman 185 

1875. Songs of Many Seasons 142 
Grandmother's Story of Bunker Hill 

Battle 144 

1877. Poems, Household Edition 146 

1879. John Lothrop Motley. A Memoir 185 
The School-Boy 150 

1880. Jonathan Edwards 188 
The Iron Gate, and Other Poems 151 

1881. Poems, Handy Volume Edition 152 
1883. Medical Essays, 1842-82 189 

Pages from an Old Volume of Life 190 

1885. Ralph Waldo Emerson 191 

A Mortal Antipathy 192, 316 

The Last Leaf " 153 

1887. Our Hundred Days in Europe 192 

Before the Curfew, and Other Poems 155 

1891. Tribute to Henry J. Bigelow, M. D. 195 
Over the Teacups 196 
Works, Riverside Edition 200 

1892. Works, Standard Library Edition 200 
1892-96. Works, Artists' Edition 201 

The One-Hoss Shay, etc. 157 

Dorothy Q., etc. 158 

1895. Poems, Cambridge Edition 158 

1899. Poems, Cabinet Edition 160 

1900. Works, Popular Edition 201 
1904. Works, Autocrat Edition 201 



ALPHABETICAL LIST OF SINGLE 
TITLES 

In this list those titles which are not included in the collected 
editions of Dr. Holmes's Works are preceded by an asterisk; those 
which have been published separately are printed in small capitals. 

I 

POEMS 

" Ad Amicos " (For the Class Meeting, Jan. 6, 1876) 
Atlantic Monthly, March, 1876, vol. 37, pp. 314-315. 
Poems, Household Edition, 1877. 

Additional Songs and Poems of the Class of 1829, 1881, pp. 
165-168. 

Ad Sodales (Written for the Class Meeting, Jan. 6, 1870) 
Songs of Many Seasons, 1875. 
Additional Songs and Poems of the Class of 1829, 1881, pp. 

130-135. 
Printed in Songs of Many Seasons, and in all subsequent 
collected editions, under the title "Even-Song." The records 
of the Class aver that Dr. Holmes had given it as a title "Sat 
prata biberunt," and had addressed it Ad Sodales. 
Address for the Opening of the Fifth Avenue Theatre 
(New York, Dec. 3, 1873) 
Songs of Many Seasons, 1875. 
See Appendix, p. 305, infra. 

Estivation (An Unpublished Poem by my late Latin Tutor) 
Atlantic Monthly, Sept., 1858, vol. 2, pp. 500-501, in the 

"Autocrat." 
Autocrat of the Breakfast-Table, 1858, p. 307. 
Songs in Many Keys, 1862. 

After a Lecture on Keats 

Songs in Many Keys, 1862. 



[4] 

After a Lecture on Moore 

Songs in Many Keys, 1862. 

After a Lecture on Shelley 
Songs in Many Keys, 1862. 

After a Lecture on Wordsworth ^ 
Songs in Many Keys, 1862. 
See "A Vision of the Housatonic." 
After the Burial 

Boston Weekly Globe, Tuesday, Sept. 27, 1881. (Garfield 

Memorial Number.) 
The Poets' Tribute to Garfield. The collection of poems for 

the Boston Globe, 1881, pp. 28-30. 
See "On the Death of President Garfield." 

After the Curfew (Read at the Class Meeting, Jan. 10, 
1889) 

Latest Poems of the Class of 1829, 1890, pp. 227-229. 

Atlantic Monthly, Feb., 1890, vol. 65, pp. 242-243, in " Over 
the Teacups." 

Over the Teacups, 1890, pp. 69-70. 

Poems, Riverside Edition, 1891. 

This was the last of the long and wonderful list of Class poems. 
There was but one more "regular" meeting, — on January 9, 
1890, — when Dr. Holmes and only two other members of the 
class met at the Parker House; "for the first time in forty full 
years Holmes had come without a poem." 

After the Fure (Boston, Nov. 30, 1872) 

Atlantic Monthly, 1873, vol. 31, pp. 96-97 
Songs of Many Seasons, 1875. 

After-Dhiner Poem, An (Phi Beta Kappa, Cambridge, 1843) 

Poems, Household Edition, 1877. 

Originally printed in Graham's Magazine and in Poems 
(London), 1846, under the title "Terpsichore," which see. 

^ The four poems last named, together with a fifth, "At the Close of a 
Com-se of Lectm-es," were read as postludes to a course on English Poetry 
of the Nineteenth Century, delivered before the Lowell Institute, Boston, 
in 1853, and never published. 



[5] 

Agassiz, Farewell to 

See " A Farewell to Agassiz." 
Agnes 

Songs in Many Keys, 1862/ 

"Liberty was granted to Dr. Holmes, at his written request, 
to make certain extracts from the manuscript diary of Sir 
Henry Franckland, for the illustration of a narrative poem 
written by himself." — Proceedings of Massachusetts Histor- 
ical Society, Sept. 13, 1860, vol. 5, p. 63. 

Album Verses 

Atlantic Monthly, Nov., 1857, vol. 1, p. 54, in the "Autocrat." ^ 
Autocrat of the Breakfast-Table, 1858, pp. 18-19. 
Poems, Household Edition, 1877. 

Alexis, Grand Duke, of Russia 

See "At the Banquet to the Grand Duke Alexis," and "A 
Welcome to the Grand Duke Alexis." 

All Here. 1829-1867 (Written for the Class Meeting, 
Jan. 10, 1867) 
Atlantic Monthly, March, 1867, vol. 19, pp. 323-324. 
Songs and Poems of the Class of 1829, 1868, pp. 90-92. 
Songs of Many Seasons, 1875. 

Alumni of Harvard College, Meeting of the 
See "Meeting of the Alumni," etc. 

America to Russia (Read by Hon. G. V. Fox at a dinner 
given to the Mission from the United States, St. Peters- 
burg, Aug. 5, 1866) 

Russian Account of the Official Mission of G. V. Fox to Rus- 
sia in 1866. Translated by S. N. Buynitzky, 1867, p. 18. 
Songs of Many Seasons, 1875. 

"Early in 1866," says Mrs. Hughes,^ " Mr. Fox, still Assistant 

^ In a note to this poem Dr. Holmes speaks of its having been published 
June 10, 1861, but the compiler has been unable to find any publication 
containing it of an earlier date than this volume, which was copyrighted 
in 1861, and actually issued late in that year, 

2 There printed without title. 

' Sarah Forbes Hughes: Letters and Recollections of John Murray 
Forbes, 1899, vol. ii, pp. 159-160. 



[6] 

Secretary of the Navy, was sent by the United States Govern- 
ment, in a monitor, to Russia, to offer to the Czar our country's 
congratulations on the freeing of the serfs. When this was in 
contemplation, it occurred to my father that a slightly different 
touch might be given to the affair by some verses *with a good 
ring to them;' and accordingly, at his suggestion, his kind 
friend. Dr. Oliver Wendell Holmes, wrote for this occasion 
the ode beginning: 

' Though watery deserts hold apart 
The worlds of East and West.' 

"Mr. Fox, after crossing the ocean successfully in the small 
monitor, . . . arrived duly in Russia; the poem was read to 
the Czar and translated by the court poet, and was a great 
success." 

American Academy Centemiial Celebration (May 26, 1880) 
Memoirs of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, 

Centennial Volume (vol. 11, part i), 1882, pp. 11-13.^ 
The Iron Gate, and Other Poems, 1880. 

American Medical Association, Meeting of the (1853) 
See "Poem for the Meeting, etc.," and ["A Sentiment"]. 

Andrew, Governor, Hymn for the Inauguration of 
See "Hymn for the Inauguration," etc. 

Angel-Thief, The (Read at the Class Meeting, Jan. 5, 
1888) 

Before the Curfew, and Other Poems, 1888. 

Latest Poems of the Class of 1829, 1890, pp. ^25-226. 

A[ngier], J[oseph], 1871 
See "Our Sweet Singer." 

Appeal for the Old South, An 

Poems, Household Edition, 1877. 
See "The Brave Old South." 

1 The poem was read during the exercises at the Old South Chiuch, 
and was prefaced by some hmnorous remarks, printed on p. 11 of the 
volmne. 



[7] 

Archbishop, The, and Gil Bias 

Atlantic Monthly, Aug., 1880, vol. 46, pp. 205-206. 
The Iron Gate, and Other Poems, 1880. 
See "A Dialogue. Senex — Juvenis." 

Army Hymn 

Atlantic Monthly, June, 1861, vol. 7, p. 757. 

A Discourse before the Ancient and Honorable Artillery Com- 
pany on its ccxxiii Anniversary, June 3, 1861 ; by S. K. 
Lothrop, D.D., pp. 59-60. 

Chimes of Freedom and Union, 1861, p. 14. 

Monthly Journal of the American Unitarian Association, Oct., 
1861 (army number), vol. 2, p. 452. 

Songs in Many Keys, 1862. 

Astr^a: the Balance of Illusions (Phi Beta Kappa, 
Yale, 1850) 

Poems, London, 1852. 

Poems, Cambridge Edition, 1895. 

The original ms. of " Astrsea," 32 pp. 4to, signed, dated 
Aug. 4, 1850 (bound in half morocco), brought $111.00 at the 
Kennedy Sale, April, 1904. 

[At a Birthday Festival] To J. R. Lowell 

Atlantic Monthly, April, 1859, vol. 3, p. 493, in the "Pro- 
fessor." 
Professor at the Breakfast-Table, 1859, pp. 96-97. 
Songs in Many Keys, 1862. 
First printed with title in last-named volume. 

At a Diimer to Admiral Farragut (July 6, 1865) 
Songs of Many Seasons, 1875. 

At a Dinner to General Grant (July 31, 1865) 
Songs of Many Seasons, 1875. 

At a Meeting of Friends (Aug. 29, 1859) 
Poems, Household Edition, 1877. 

In Mr. Longfellow's Journal under the above date is the follow- 
ing entry: "Drove up to town to dine with Dr. Holmes's friends 
on his fiftieth birthday. Felton presided. A dehghtful dinner. 



[8] 

Holmes made a charming little speech with some verses at the 
end to round it off." — S. Longfellow's Life of H. W. Long- 
fellow, vol. ii, p. 393, Standard Library Edition. 

At my Fireside 

Before the Curfew, and Other Poems, 1888, p. iii, as Prelude. 

At the Atlantic Dinner (Dec. 15, 1874) 
Poems, Household Edition, 1877. 

At the Banquet to the Chinese Embassy (Aug. 21, 1868) 
Reception and Entertainment of the Chinese Embassy by 

the City of Boston, 1868, pp. 41-42. 
Songs of Many Seasons, 1875. 

At the Banquet to the Grand Duke Alexis (Dec. 11, 1871)^ 

His Imperial Highness the Grand Duke Alexis in the United 
States of America diu-ing the winter of 1871-72 (1872), 
p. 97. 

Songs of Many Seasons, 1875. 

At the Banquet to the Japanese Embassy (Aug. 2, 1872) 
Songs of Many Seasons, 1875. 

At the Close of a Course of Lectures 
Songs in Many Keys, 1862. 
See note on p. 4, supra. 

At the Pantomime (18 — . Rewritten 1874) 

Songs of Many Seasons, 1875. 

The last four stanzas are printed in " Over the Teacups," 
1890, pp. 198-199 (Atlantic Monthly, July, 1890, vol. 66, 
p. 103). 

At the Papyrus Club 

The L-on Gate, and Other Poems, 1880. 

At the Saturday Club 

Atlantic Monthly, Jan., 1884, vol. 53, pp. 68-71. 
Before the Curfew, and Other Poems, 1888. 

^ This poem is dated Dec. 9 in all editions of the Poems, but the 
banquet actually took place on the 11th. 



[9] 

At the Summit (To Harriet Beecher Stowe on her seven- 
tieth birthday, June 14, 1882) 
Atlantic Monthly, Aug., 1882, vol. 50, pp. 164-165. 
Before the Curfew, and Other Poems, 1888. 

At the Turn of the Road 

Atlantic Monthly, Oct., 1890, vol. 66, p. 547, m " Over the 

Teacups." 
Over the Teacups, 1890, pp. 288-289. 
Poems, Riverside Edition, 1891. 

At the Unitarian Festival (March 8, 1882) 

Before the Curfew, and Other Poems, 1888. 
Aunt Tahitha 

Atlantic Monthly, March, 1872, vol. 29, p. 349, in the " Poet." 

Poet at the Breakfast-Table, 1872, pp. 102-103. 

Songs of Many Seasons, 1875. 

Ave 

Atlantic Monthly, April, 1884, vol. 53, pp. 456-457. 
Illustrated Poems, 1885, pp. x-xi, as Prelude. 

Avis 

Atlantic Monthly, Dec, 1858, vol. 2, pp. 893-894, in "The 

Autocrat Gives a Breakfast to the Public." 
Songs in Many Keys, 1862. 

An autograph ms. of "Avise " [sic] on 3 quarto pages, with an 
explanatory note, also in autograph, on a separate page, signed in 
full, brought $36.00 at the Williamson Sale in March, 1904, and 
$11.00 at the Wendell Sale, in May, 1905. See also p. 97, injra. 

Ballad of the Boston Tea-Party, A 

Proceedings of the Massachusetts Historical Society, Dec. 
16, 1873, vol. 13, pp. 202-204. 

Proceedings at a Special Meeting of the Mass. Hist. Soc, 
Dec. 16, 1873, being the 100th Anniversary of the de- 
struction of the tea in Boston Harbor, 1874, pp. 56-58. 

Atlantic Monthly, Feb., 1874, vol. 33, pp. 219-221. 

Songs of Many Seasons, 1875. 

Ballad of the Oysterman, The 

The Amateur, July 17, 1830, no. 3, pp. 37-38. 



[10] 

The Harbinger (1833), pp. 36-38. 
Poems, 1836. 

Banditti 

New England Galaxy, 1830. 

The Gleaner, or Selections in Prose and Poetry from the 

Periodical Press, 1830, pp. 33-35. 
See " The Music-Grinders." 

Banker's Dinner, The 

Songs in Many Keys, 1862. 
Poems, Household Edition, 1877. 

See "The Banker's Secret," "Each Heart has its own 
Secret," and " Readings over the Teacups." 

Banker's Secret, The 

Poems, Riverside Edition, 1891, in "Readings over the Tea- 
cups." 

Poems, Cambridge Edition, 1895. 

Originally printed under the title "The Banker's Dinner," 
as one of the group. Pictures from Occasional Poems, in Songs 
in Many Keys, 1862, and still so printed in the Household 
Edition. See " Each Heart has its own Secret." 

Before the Curfew (Read at the Class Meeting, Jan. 5, 
1882) 

Atlantic Monthly, March, 1882, vol. 49, pp. 386-388. 

Before the Curfew, and Other Poems, 1888. 

Latest Poems of the Class of 1829, 1890, pp. 204-208. 

Printed under the title "In the Twihght," in Poems, River- 
side Edition, 1891, and in the Cambridge Edition, 1895. 

Bells, The 

Songs in Many Keys, 1862. 
See note to "Spring." 

* Beni-Israel 

Gifts of Genius, a Miscellany of Prose and Poetry, 1859, 
pp. 260-263. 

Berkshire Festival, Lines recited at the 

See "Lines recited at the Berkshire Festival." 



[11] 

Bill and Joe 

Atlantic Monthly, Sept., 1868, vol. 22, pp. 313-314. 

Songs of Many Seasons, 1875. 

Additional Songs and Poems of the Class of 1829, 1881, pp. 
121-123. 

"Although not written for a meeting of the Class, yet as 
the Class of 1829 is the subject of them, and one of the 
Class their author, these Hues belong here." Dr. Holmes read 
the poem to the Class in Jan., 1869, and thereafter it was 
"one of the Class Poems unmistakably and forever." Since 
1877 it has stood, without date, at the head of the "Poems of 
the Class of 1829," in all collected editions. 

Birthday of Daniel Webster (Jan. 18, 1856) 

The Seventy-Foiu'th Anniversary of the Birthday of Daniel 

Webster, 1856, pp. 49-51. 
Songs in Many Keys, 1862. 

Birthday Tribute, A. To J. F. Clarke (April 4, 1860) 
Memorial of the Commemoration by the Church of the Dis- 
ciples of the 50th Birthday of their Pastor, James Free- 
man Clarke, 1860, pp. 19-20. 
Songs in Many Keys, 1862. 

Bonaparte, August 15, 1769. — Humboldt, September 14, 
1769 
Leaflet, oblong 8vo. 

Address delivered on the Centennial Anniversary of the 
birth of Alexander von Humboldt, etc., by Louis Agassiz. 
With an Account of the Evening Reception, 1869, pp. 
86-88. 
Atlantic Monthly, Dec, 1869, vol. 24, pp. 637-638. 
"Last week we had a Humboldt celebration, or rather two, 
in Boston. ... Of course I wrote a poem, which I had the 
wonderful good sense to positively refuse delivering in Music 
Hall after the long Address of Agassiz, but read at the Soiree 
afterwards. I thought well of it, as I am apt to, and others liked 
it. Applaud my abstinence in not sending it to you." Holmes 
to Motley, Sept. 26, 1869, in Morse's Life and Letters of 
O. W. H., vol. ii, p. 184. 
See "Humboldt's Birthday." 



[12] 

Boston Church Bells 

The Boston Book, 1850, pp. 9-10. 

An extract from "Urania, a Rhymed Lesson." A portion 
of the same extract appears in Poetry of the Bells, collected by 
S. Batchelder, Jr., 1858, p. 64. See " A Sabbath in Boston." 

Boston Common — Three Pictures (1630, 1774, 186-) 
(For the Fair in aid of the Fund to procure Ball's Statue 
of Washington) 

Leaflet, 4to, pp. 4, 1859. See Appendix, p. 305, infra. 

Songs in Many Keys, 1862. 

Boston to Florence (Sent to the *' Philological Circle" of 
Florence for its meeting in commemoration of Dante, Jan. 
27, 1881, anniversary of his first condemnation) 

Atlantic Monthly, March, 1881, vol. 47, p. 412. 
Poems, Handy Volume Edition, 1881. 

Boston Young Men's Christian Union 

See "Hymn written for the Twenty-fifth Anniversary of the 
Reorganization," etc., and "Youth." 

Boys, The (Written for the Class Meeting, Jan. 6, 1859) 
Atlantic Monthly, Feb., 1859, vol. 3, pp. 240-241, m the 

"Professor." 
Professor at the Breakfast-Table, 1859, pp. 61-62. 
Songs and Poems of the Class of 1829, 1859, pp. 29-31. 
Songs in Many Keys, 1862. 

Brave Old South, The 

"While stands the CoHseum, Rome shall stand; 
When falls the Coliseum, Rome shall fall." 
Leaflet, 1 page. 

Poems of the Old South (iUustrated), 1877, pp. 8-10. 
Copies of the leaflet were sold at Tibbie's in April, 1900, for 
$5.75, and at Anderson's in the same month for $9.00. 
See "An Appeal for the Old South." 

Britain and America 

Canadian Journal of Agriculture, July, 1858, vol. 3, pp. 
365-367. 



[13] 

Addressed to Charles Mackay at Boston "on the eve of his 
final departure from American shores . . . from the pen of the 
American poet Dr. Oliver Wendell Holmes." 
See "A Good Time Going." 

Broken Circle, The (Read at the Class Meeting, Jan. 6, 
1887) 
Atlantic Monthly, June, 1887, vol. 59, p. 842, m " Our Hun- 
dred Days in Europe." ' 
Our Hundred Days in Europe, 1887, pp. 111-113. 
Before the Curfew, and Other Poems, 1888. 
Latest Poems of the Class of 1829, 1890, pp. 223-225. 

Broomstick Train, The 

Atlantic Monthly, Aug., 1890, vol. 66, pp. 246-248, in " Over 

the Teacups." 
Over the Teacups, 1890, pp. 226-230. 
Poems, Riverside Edition, 1891. 

Brother Jonathan's Lament for Sister Caroline (March 25, 
1861) 

Atlantic Monthly, May, 1861, vol. 7, p. 613. 
Chimes of Freedom and Union, 1861, pp. 27-28. 
Songs in Many Keys, 1862. 

Bryant's Seventieth Birthday (November 3, 1864) 

The Bryant Festival at " The Century" (illustrated), 1865 

(c. 1864), pp. 43-47.1 
Atlantic Monthly, Dec, 1864, vol. 14, pp. 738-740. 
Songs of Many Seasons, 1875. 

But One Talent 

Atlantic Monthly, Dec, 1890, vol. 66, pp. 833-834. 
Poems, Cambridge Edition, 1895. 

Cacoethes Scribendi 

Atlantic Monthly, March, 1890, vol. 65, p. 412, in " Over the 

Teacups." 
Over the Teacups, 1890, p. 93. 
Poems, Riverside Edition, 1891. 

^ Only 150 copies printed. 



[14] 

Cambridge Churchyard, The 

Poems, 1836, pp. 16-20. 

Here printed as a part of "Poetry: a Metrical Essay," with- 
out separate title; in the contents, however, the above appears 
as a sub-title under " Poetry." First printed as a separate 
poem in Blue and Gold Edition, 1862. 

* Camilla 

The Poet among the Hills (J. E. A. Smith), 1895, pp. 153-154. 
Written in 1855. A zealous parishioner of St. Stephen's, 
Pittsfield, called upon Dr. Holmes to ask him to contribute two 
poems for the "post-office" at a fair to be given by the parish. 
Having promised the poems, "Dr. Holmes, of course, escorted 
his fair besieger to the door; and in assisting her to remount 
her horse, being perhaps poetically nervous, he did not calcu- 
late with precise accuracy the amount of force necessary to 
place her gracefully in her seat. The saddle was, however, 
gained without a fall. But the poet, busy as he was, did not 
forget the incident, and when the fair postmistress received the 
two poems promised for her mail, there came also one for IVIiss 

M which described it with his never-failing gi-ace, wit, 

and accuracy." — Smith, pp, 151-153. 

The gray robe trailing round her feet, 

She smiled and took the slippered stirrup 
(A smile as sparkling, rosy, sweet, 

As soda, drawn with strawberry syrup); — 
Now, gallant, now! be strong and calm, — 

The graceful toilet is completed, — 
Her foot is in thy hollowed palm — 

One little spring, and she is seated! 

No foot-print on the grass was seen, 

The clover hardly bent beneath her, 
I knew not if she pressed the green. 

Or floated over it in ether; 
Why, such an airy, fairy thing 

Should carry ballast in her pocket, — 
God bless me! If I help her spring 

She'll shoot up heavenward like a rocket. 

Ah, fatal doubt! The sleepless power 
That chains the orbs of light together, 



[15] 

Bends on its stem the slenderest flower 
That lifts its plume from turf or heather; 

Clasp, lady, clasp the bridle rein! 
The filly stands — hold hard upon her! 

Twine fast those fingers in her mane, 
Or all is lost — excepting honor! 

Earth stretched his arms to snatch his prize. 
The fairies shouted "Stand from under!'* 
The violets shut their purple eyes, 

The naked daisies stared in wonder; 
One moment. — Seated in her pride, 
Those arms shall try in vain to win her; 
"Earth claims her not," the fairies cried, 
"She has so little of it in her!" 

* Cannibal, The 

Collegian, April, 1830, no. 3, pp. 103-106. 
Chambered Nautilus, The 

Atlantic Monthly, Feb., 1858, vol. 1, pp. 468-469, in the 

"Autocrat." 
Autocrat of the Breakfast-Table, 1858, pp. 110-111. 
Songs in Many Keys, 1862. 

Mr. Foley catalogues a privately printed edition of The 
Chambered Nautilus (12mo, Cambridge, 1879), with a transla- 
tion into Latin, signed E. S. D. A copy of this edition was sold 
at Libbie's in April, 1897, for $13.00. At the Edwin P. Whipple 
Sale, in April, 1903, the original ms. of the poem, with this 
inscription : " For Mr. Whipple, with kindest regards and good 
wishes, Christmas " [1879], was sold for $65.00. 

Chanson without Music. By the Professor Emeritus of Dead 
and Live Languages ($. B. K. Cambridge, 1867) 
Atlantic Monthly, Nov., 1867, vol. 20, pp. 543-544. 
Songs of Many Seasons, 1875. 

Chinese Embassy, At> the Banquet to the 
See "At the Banquet," etc. 

Choose You this Day whom Ye will Serve (Read at the 
Class Meeting, Jan. 8, 1863) 
Atlantic Monthly, March, 1863, vol. 11, pp. 288-289. 



[16] 

Songs and Poems of the Class of 1829, 1868, pp. 69-71. 
Songs of Many Seasons, 1875. 
See Appendix, p. 305, injra. 

* City Madrigals (By the Author of State Prison Melodies) 
The Amateur, April 9, 1831, no. 18, p. 275. Signed O. W. H. 

Clarke, James Freeman 

See "A Birthday Tribute," and "To James Freeman Clarke." 

Class of '29. Nov. 6, 1856 
Songs in Many Keys, 1862. 
See "Our Indian Summer." 

Claudian Aqueduct, The 

The Token and Atlantic Souvenir, 1837 [c. 1836], pp. 337- 
338. 

In Table of Contents, "Roman Aqueduct, by O. W. Holmes." 
The poem is accompanied by a cut representing the ruins of 
an aqueduct, and there is a head-note, which, after describing 
the cut, continues: "The following lines handed us by a friend, 
though not accurately descriptive of this aqueduct, are full of 
beauty, and suggest many thoughts and feelings appropriate to 
the scene." 

See "A Roman Aqueduct." 

Comet, The 

[Buckingham's] New England Magazine, April, 1832, vol. 2, 

pp. 300-301. 
Poems, 1836. 
The Boston Book, 1837, pp. 37-39. 

Coming Era, The 

Atlantic Monthly, Jan., 1880, vol. 45, pp. 84-85. 
The Iron Gate, and Other Poems, 1880. 

Contentment 

Atlantic Monthly, Sept., 1858, vol. 2, pp. 502-503; in the 

"Autocrat." 
Autocrat of the Breakfast-Table, 1858, pp. 312-315. 

C[rocker], F[rederick] W[illiam] 
See "Our Classmate, F W. C." 



[17] 

Crooked Footpath, The 

Atlantic Monthly, April, 1859, vol. 3, p. 503, in the "Pro- 
fessor." 
Professor at the Breakfast-Table, 1859, pp. 128-129. 
Songs in Many Keys, 1862. 

* Crossing the Ford 

Youth's Keepsake; a Christmas and New Year's Gift for 

Young People, 1831, p. 198. 
American Common-Place Book of Poetry, Geo. B. Cheever, 

editor, 1831, pp. 396-397. 

Clouds, forests, hills and waters! — and they sleep 
As if a spirit pressed their pulses down, — 

From the calm bosom of the waveless deep 
Up to the mountain with the sunht crown. 

Still as the moss-grown cities of the dead. 

Save the dull plashing of the horse's tread. 

And who are they that stir the slumbering stream ? 

Nay, curious reader, I can only say 
That, to my eyes of ignorance, they seem 

Like honest rustics on their homeward way; 
There is a village; doubtless thence they came; 
There was a christening; and they have a name. 

They are to us, hke many a living form. 
The image of a moment, and they pass 

Like the last cloud that vanished on the storm, 
Like the last shape upon the faithless glass; 

By lake, or stream, by valley, field, or hill. 

They must have lived; perchance are hving still. 

Daily Trials, by a Sensitive Man 
Poems, 1836. 

Originally appeared in [Buckingham's] New England Maga- 
zine, vol. 3, p. 21, under the title "Ugly Reflections." 

De Sauty. An Electro-Chemical Eclogue 

Atlantic Monthly, Jan., 1859, vol. 3, p. 96, in the " Pro- 
fessor." 
Professor at the Breakfast-Table, 1859, pp. 33-35. 
Songs in Many Keys, 1862. 



[ 18 ] 

Deacon's Masterpiece, The: or the Wonderful One-Hoss 
Shay 

Atlantic Monthly, Sept., 1858, vol. 2, pp. 496-497, in the 

"Autocrat." 
Autocrat of the Breakfast-Table, 1858, pp. 295-298. 
Songs in Many Keys, 1862. 

* "Dear little Dorothy, Dorothy Q " 

Life and Letters of Oliver Wendell Holmes (Morse), 1896, 
vol. i, p. 231. 

When Dr. Holmes heard of the birth of a daughter to his 
nephew and namesake, O. W. H. Upham, and that she was 
named Dorothy Q., "he wrote and sent to his little grand- 
niece a couple of stanzas, which make a pretty pendant to the 
original poem [Dorothy Q.]." The ms. of the poem is still in 
the possession of the young lady to whom it was addressed. It 
was written in 1882. 

"Dear little Dorothy, Dorothy Q., 
What can I find to write to you ? 
You have two U's in your name, it's true. 
And mine is adorned with a double-u; 
But there's this difference in the U's, 
That one you will stand a chance to lose 
When a happy man of the bearded sex 
Shall make it Dorothy Q. + X. 

" May Heaven smile bright on the blissful day 
That teaches this lesson in Algebra! 
When the orange blossoms crown your head, 
Then read what your old great-uncle said, 
And remember how in your baby-time 
He scribbled a scrap of idle rhyme, — 
Idle, it may be — but kindly, too. 
For the little lady, Dorothy Q." 

Departed Days 

The Boston Book, 1841, p. 298. 
Poems, London, 1846. 

* Departure, The (The Athenseum Gallery) 

The Amateur, June 15, 1830, no. 1, p. 16. 
The Harbinger, 1833, pp. 32-34. 



[19] 

* Destroyers, The 

[Buckingham's] New England Magazine, March, 1832, vol. 2, 
p. 202. 

Dialogue, A. Senex — Juvenis (Read at the Class Meeting, 
Jan. 9, 1879) 

Additional Songs and Poems of the Class of 1829, 1881, pp. 

180-183. 
Printed "with some changes" in the Atlantic Monthly for 
Aug., 1880, under the title "The Archbishop and Gil Bias." 

Dickens, Charles, Dinner given to, by the Young Men of 
Boston 
See "Song, written for the Dinner," etc. 
Dilemma, The 

[Buckingham's] New England Magazine, Jan., 1832, vol. 2, 

p. 36. 
The Harbinger, 1833, pp. 46-48. 
Poems, 1836. 

Disappointed Statesman, The 
Songs in Many Keys, 1862. 
Poems, Household Edition, 1877. 

See "The Statesman's Secret," "Readings over the Tea- 
cups," and " Each Heart has its own Secret." 

* DoUar's Worth, A 

The Poet among the Hills (J. E. A. Smith), 1895, pp. 156-157. 

This was the second of the poems written by Dr. Holmes in 
1855 for the "post-oflSce" in connection with the St. Stephen's 
Church fair. (See "Camilla," and "Fair lady, whosoe'er thou 
art.") The motto on the envelope was: 

"If man, or boy, or dolt, or scholar 

Will break this seal, he pays his dollar; 
But if he reads a single minute, 

He'll find a dollar's worth within it" 

* Domestic Thoughts 

The Amateur, Sept. 4, 1830, no. 6, p. 92. 
The Harbmger, 1833, pp. 40-41. 



[ 20 ] 

Dorchester Giant, The 

The Collegian, April, 1830, no. 3, pp. 123-125. 
Poems, 1836. 

Dorothy Q 

Atlantic Monthly, Jan., 1871, vol. 27, pp. 120-121. 
Songs of Many Seasons, 1875. 

Dream, The (Written for the Class Meeting, Nov., 1854) 
Songs and Poems of the Class of 1829, 1859, pp. 14-16. 
See "The Old Man Dreams." 

Dying Seneca, The 

The Harbinger, 1833, pp. 31-32. 

Poems, 1836. 

Poems, Cambridge Edition, 1895. 

Not in Household or Riverside Edition. 

* Each Heart has its own Secret 

In the Mercantile Library Reporter ("conducted by the 
Literary Committees of the Mercantile Library Association") 
for January, 1856, vol. 2,^ pp. 36-40, is a report of the opening 
of the fifteenth annual course of public lectures before the As- 
sociation, on Wednesday [Thursday], Nov. 15, 1855, when an 
address was dehvered by Prof. F. D. Huntington of Cambridge, 
and a poem by Dr. Holmes. After a sketch of Prof. Hunting- 
ton's remarks the report continues (p. 38) : — 

"The new poem by Dr. Holmes, *Each heart has its own 
Secret,' was the next grand feature of the evening. Although not 
written in the Doctor's most humorous vein, it nevertheless 
abounded in many sly hits and jocose allusions, and, when 
pubKshed (as it soon will be, with Mr. Huntington's address, 
under the auspices of the Association), we are confident that 
it will be eagerly sought for and read with intense pleasure, and 
will prove to be the happiest of the genial author's many happy 
efforts. . . . 

"The unity of the poem consisted in the fact that all its parts 
illustrated the truth that 'Each Heart has its own Secret.' The 
illustrations were five in number, each of them a distinct, in- 
dependent narrative or picture. 

* Only three volumes of this periodical were published. 



[21] 

"The first may be called 'The Island Ruin.' Such a ruin as 
is described is still to be seen in Boston Harbor. The life of its 
former occupant was a mystety [sic]. His secret perished with 
him. 

"The second narrative, or picture, is *The Banker's Dinner.' 
The supposed rich man gives a great banquet, which is de- 
scribed. His secret comes out at the end of the feast. 

"The third story is that of a young Roman, who was sick, and 
nobody could tell what was the matter with him. A Greek 
physician came and found out his secret. This story is a varia- 
tion on the old stories of Erasistratus and Galen. 

"The fourth picture is that of a statesman who is unhappy 
in the midst of his triumphs. His secret, which all the world 
guesses, is a devouring ambition to reach a certain high office 
which really great men ought not to expect in these times. 

"The fifth picture is that of Mary, the Virgin Mother, who 
kept the secret of her wonderful child in her own heart. 

"The concluding lines relate to the secrets of the earth, of the 
stars, and of their Creator. 

"In an introduction of about a hundred lines, a veteran actor 
is brought before the curtain, and his feehngs and recollections 
traced in a few sketches. 

"We subjoin some passages from different parts of thepoem. 

The compiler has been unable to discover any direct evidence 
that the address and poem were ever published " under the 
auspices of the Association;" inquiry at the rooms of the Asso- 
ciation, which is still in existence, in its 86th year, failed to 
disclose any trace of such publication. But the following pass- 
ages of a letter from J. L. Motley, to Dr. Holmes, dated May 3, 
1857, prove conclusively that this same poem was sent — it may 
have been in print, or in manuscript, but as a single poem — to 
the historian; the last sentence, it will be noticed, identifies the 
place where it was delivered. 

"I have read your poem a great many times, and have 
admired it more at each successive reading. Each of the episodes 
has freshness, strength and beauty, and the whole fabric is 
simple and nobley . . . The episode of the young Roman is 
handled with much classic elegance, as well as with great tender- 
ness and truth. The best portion, however, is that which 
embodies the mother's secret. . . . The Webster photograph 
is bold, shadowy and imposing, but would probably elicit more 



[ 22 ] 

hearty applause from a public audience than from some of us 
who have perhaps pondered too much the unheroic and the 
unpoetical elements which constituted so much of that golden- 
hearted and clay-footed image. 

"The same remark I should be inclined to make upon the 
fraudulent banker. I suppose that you will not agree with me, 
and very likely it is some narrowness on my part, or over- 
squeamishness, but the particulars of a modern dinner-party 
will refuse to make poetry to my imagination. . . . The de- 
scription of the ruined home on Apple Island is almost the best 
thing in the poem. . . . 

"But you cannot do what I wish you to do except upon two 
conditions: one, devotion of your faculties and of your time to 
the one great object; the other, cotton-wooling your ears abso- 
lutely to all hand-clapping and greasy mob-applause of mer- 
cantile lecture-rooms.^^ '^ 

When Dr. Holmes published the collection called "Songs 
in Many Keys," in 1862, he included therein, under the sub- 
heading, "Pictures from Occasional Poems, 1850-1856," 
certain portions of the Yale Phi Beta Kappa poem of 1850: 
" Astrsea" (see supra, p. 7), and the following seven poems, viz., 
"The Old Player," "The Island Ruin," "The Banker's Din- 
ner," "The Mysterious Illness," "A Mother's Secret," "The 
Disappointed Statesman," and "The Secret of the Stars." 
These poems were published under the same sub-heading, and 
with the same titles, in all subsequent collections prior to the 
Riverside Edition in 1895,^ when all of them save the first 
were arranged in a new setting, with a prelude and interludes, 
and under different titles, with the exception of "The Secret 
of the Stars." "The Old Player" was left by itseK among the 
Songs in Many Keys. 

Now, it appears from the passages of "Each Heart has its own 
Secret" printed in the Mercantile Library Reporter that these 

^ The morning papers of Thursday, Nov. 15, report this meeting of the 
Association, and the Advertiser gives an outline of the poem at some 
length. •' The general theme was * The Heart's Secret.' " — The Post says : 
" The poem was a mystery. It abounded in the humor with which the 
Doctor is surcharged, revealing itself in flashes of jetty light ... all 
woven in a mystical braid, that like a strain of wild music, puzzled the 
mind to understand it, but made the heart feel better as it listened." 

^ And are still so printed in the Household Edition. 



[23] 

seven poems were originally embodied in the long poem of that 
title read before the Mercantile Library Association. The 
"introduction of about a hundred lines "is "The Old Player," 
which has 120. "The Island Ruin" retains its name, as does 
"The Banker's Dinner;" "the story of the young Roman" 
(named Lucius) is "The Mysterious Illness;" "The Disap- 
pointed Statesman" retains its name, wliile the "picture of 
Mary, the Virgin Mother," becomes "A Mother's Secret." ^ 

The Riverside Edition of the Poems was prepared under the 
personal supervision of Dr. Holmes, so that the separation of 
"The Old Player" from its fellows was presumably intentional; 
but the editor of the Cambridge Edition was evidently not aware 
of the history of these poems, as he gives 1850-1856 as the date 
of composition of those included in "Readings over the Tea- 
cups;" whereas it is clear enough that those dates, 1850-1856, 
meant that the extracts from "Astrsea" belonged in 1850, and 
the others in 1856 (1855). Furthermore, in the Cambridge Edi- 
tion 1859 is suggested as the probable date of "The Old Player." 

Almost all of the passages given in the Reporter show some 
variations from the present text of the corresponding passages 
of the separate poems, and a number of Hues are omitted 
altogether. For instance, at the close of the introduction, the 
subject of the poem is announced thus : 

"The Heart's own Secret! How a single word 
Would tell our history, and we die unheard! 
"When Love's dear witchery makes us more than kind; 
When Friendship Hfts the flood-gates of the mind; 
When the red wine -cup brings its haK-ecHpse, 
And the heart's night-birds flutter round the lips; 
That single word the faithful traitors shun : 
Tell follies, sins and secrets — all but one. 
Behold the simple thread that intertwines 
Its sober strand along my pictured lines." 

And from the conclusion (The Secret of the Stars), these lines 
are quoted, referring to the national flag: 

"One hue it borrows from the tropic rose. 
And one comes glistening from the polar snows; 

* It had already appeared under that title in " The Professor at the 
Breakfast-Table," in the Atlantic Monthly for June, 1859. 



[24] 

Forever braided, till the crownless Queen 
Sweeps with its folds the mighty world between!'* 

Neither of these passages is to be found in any edition of 
Dr. Holmes's poems. 

In rearranging the titles for resetting these poems, Dr. Holmes 
recurred to the original idea suggested in the title "Each Heart 
has its own Secret:" "The Island Ruin" becomes "The Exile's 
Secret;" "The Banker's Dinner," "The Banker's Secret;" 
"The Mysterious Illness," "The Lover's Secret;" and "The 
Disappointed Statesman," "The Statesman's Secret." 

Enigma, An 

The Collegian, Feb., 1830, no. 1, p. 43. 

Epilogue to the Breakfast-Table Series. Autocrat — Pro- 
fessor — Poet. At a Bookstore, a. d. 1972 

Atlantic Monthly, Dec, 1872, vol. 30, pp. 733-734, in the 

"Poet." 
Poet at the Breakfast-Table, 1872, pp. 410-412. 
Songs of Many Seasons, 1875. 

Even-Song 

Atlantic Monthly, March, 1870, vol. 25, pp. 349-351. 
Songs of Many Seasons, 1875. 
See "Ad Sodales." 

Evening, by a Tailor 

The Collegian, July, 1830, no. 6, pp. 255-256. 

The Gleaner, 1830. 

The Harbinger, 1833, pp. 56-58. 

Poems, 1836. 

Evening Thought, An. Lines written at Sea 

Poems, 1836. 

Originally appeared, under the title " Lines Written at Sea " 
(unsigned), in American Monthly Magazine, May, 1836, vol. 7, 
pp. 183-184. 

Everett, Edward 

See "Our First Citizen." 
Exile's Secret, The 

Poems, Riverside Edition, 1891. 

Poems, Cambridge Edition, 1895. 



[25] 

Originally printed, under the title " The Island Ruin," as one 
of the group Pictures from Occasional Poems, in Songs in 
Many Keys, 1862, and still so printed in the Household Edition. 
See *'Each Heart has its own Secret.'* 

Extracts from a Medical Poem 
Poems, 1849. 

These " extracts " are " The Stability of Science," "A Portrait," 
and "A Sentiment." The second, the subject of which was the 
universally beloved and respected Dr. James Jackson, was 
slightly changed in subsequent editions, the first line, 

"Simple in youth, but not austere in age," 
becoming "Thoughtful in youth," etc. 

* " Fair lady, whosoe'er thou art " 

The Poet among the Hills (J. E. A. Smith), 1895, pp. 155- 
156. 

This is one of the two poems written by Dr. Holmes in 
1855 for the "post-office" in connection with the entertainment 
given by St. Stephen's Parish, Pittsfield. (See "Camilla.") 
"The poem was inclosed in an envelope upon which was 
written this motto : 

"Faith is the conquering Angel's crown; 
Who hopes for grace must ask it; 
Look shrewdly ere you lay me down, 
I'm Portia's leaden casket." 

Within the envelope was the poem: 

"Fair lady, whosoe'er thou art, 

Tm-n this poor leaf with tenderest care. 
And — hush, O hush thy beating heart — 
The One thou lovest will be there! 

"Alas! not loved by thee alone. 
Thine idol, ever prone to range; 
To-day, all thine, to-morrow flown, 

Frail thing that every hour may change. 

"Yet, when that truant course is done, 
If thy lost wanderer reappear. 
Press to thy heart thy only One 

That nought can make more truly dear!" 



[26] 

Within this sheet was a slip of paper, with the following 
verses, inclosing a one dollar bill: 

"Fair lady, lift thine eyes and tell 
If this is not a truthful letter; 
This is the one (1) thou lovest well, 

And nought (0) can make thee love it better (10). 

"Though fickle, do not think it strange 
That such a friend is worth possessing, 
For one that gold can never change 

Is Heaven's own dearest earthly blessing.** 

* Fairy World, The 

Youth's Keepsake; a Christmas and New Year's Gift for 
Young People, 1831, pp. 207-209. 

Familiar Letter to Several Correspondents, A 

Atlantic Monthly, Jan., 1876, vol. 37, p. 103. 
Poems, Household Edition, 1877. 

Faiviily Record, A 

The Independent, July 12, 1877. 
Poems, Household Edition, 1877. 

Fantasia 

Atlantic Monthly, Feb., 1872, vol. 29, p. 236, in the "Poet." 
Poet at the Breakfast-Table, 1872, pp. 71-72. 
Songs of Many Seasons, 1875. 

Farewell to Agassiz, A (Written on the Eve of Agassiz's 
journey to Brazil, in 1865) 
Humorous Poems, 1865. 
Songs of Many Seasons, 1875. 

Farewell to J. R. Lowell, A 

Poems, Household Edition, 1877. 
See "A Good-by.'* 

First Fan, The (Read at a Meeting of the Boston Bric-a- 
Brac Club, February 21, 1877) 
Atlantic Monthly, May, 1877, vol. 39, pp. 659-662. 
Poems, Household Edition, 1877. 



[27] 

First Verses (Phillips Academy, Andover, 1824 or 1825) 
Poems, Household Edition, 1877. 
. Translation from the iEneid, Book I. "It is sixty-one years 
since I read my first verses at Phillips Academy." Dr. Holmes's 
speech at the first dinner of the P. A. Alumni Association, 
March 24, 1886. 

* Fish-Pieces, The 

The Amateur, June 15, 1830, no. l,pp. 12-13. In "Annual 
Exhibition of Paintings." 

Flaneur, The (Boston Common, Dec. 6, 1882, during the 
Transit of Venus) 
Atlantic Monthly, May, 1883, vol. 51, pp. 674-677. 
Poems, Riverside Edition, 1891. 

* Flies, The (Poetry of Real Life) 

The Amateur, Sept. 4, 1830, no. 6, p. 90. 

Flower of Liberty, The 

Atlantic Monthly, Nov., 1861, vol. 8, p. 550. 
Songs in Many Keys, 1862. 

For the Bums Centennial Celebration (Jan. 25, 1859) 

Celebration of the Hundredth Anniversary of the Birth 
of Robert Burns by the Boston Burns Club, 1859, pp. 
44-45. 
Songs in Many Keys, 1862. 

For the Centennial Dinner of the Proprietors of Boston Pier, 
or the Long Wharf (April 16, 1873) 

Centennial of the Boston Pier, or the Long Wharf Corpora- 
tion, 1873, pp. 18-20 (preceded by remarks by O. W. H.). 
Songs of Many Seasons, 1875. 

For Class Meeting (Written for the Class Meeting, Jan. 
7, 1875) 
Poems, Household Edition, 1877. 
Additional Songs and Poems of the Class of 1829, 1881, pp. 

160-161. 
Here printed with no other title than "Lines." 



[28] 

For the Commemoration Services (Cambridge, July 2\, 
1865) 
Songs of Many Seasons, 1875. 

There seems to have been no separate publication of the 
exercises on this occasion except Mr. Lowell's Commemora- 
tion Ode. Harvard College preserves the record of the day in 
a copy of the New York Times for Tuesday, July 25, 1865. 

For the Dedication of the New City Library, Boston 

Proceedings on the Occasion of Laying the Corner-Stone 
of the New Library Building of the City of Boston, Nov. 
28, 1888 (1889), pp. 17-20. (Page 17 is a half-title. The 
poem is on pp. 19-20.) 

Poems, Riverside Edition, 1891. 

For the Meeting of the Bums Club, 1856 

Celebration of the Hundredth Anniversary of the Birth of 

Robert Burns, by the Boston Burns Club, 1859, pp. 19-21. 

In "Record of Transactions" of the Burns Club, under date 

of Jan. 25, 1856 (97th anniversary). The poem as printed in 

Songs in Many Keys, and siuce, is thus introduced : 

"The following witty introduction, and beautiful poem, were 
read by Dr. Oliver Wendell Holmes, one of the guests on the 
occasion, and always a cherished friend of the Club: 

" I have come with the rest, I can hardly tell why, 
With a line I will read you before it is dry. 
I know I've no business among you, full well. 
But I'm here, notwithstanding, and how, I will tell. 

" It was not a billet beginning 'Dear Sir;' 
No missive like that would have coaxed me to stir; 
Nor a ticket, announcing the 'on' and the *at,' 
And 'requesting the honor,' — 't was better than that. 

" It was done by a visit, from one that you know. 
Whose smile is unchilled by life's season of snow, 
Whose voice is so winning, resist as you may. 
You must do what it says, for it will have its way. 

"It is true that at first I began to suggest 
I should sit like a stranger apart from the rest; 



[29] 

But he said: 'To no clan is our banquet confined, 
l^'or the heart of the poet belongs to mankind.' 

" Then I timidly asked, 'Can I run, at a pinch. 
If our friends from the old world have learned how to lynch ? ' 
For I thought with dismay of the Know-Nothing Crew, 
And I fancied a yell — 'He's a Ejiow-Nothing too!' 

" I thought of old Porteous, of Hare and of Burke; 
I remembered the witches of Alio way Kirk; — 
'Why bless you,' he said with a smile, 'if you're cotched. 
You will never be killed, you will only be Scotched!* 

" So I came, and I'm here, with a line as I said; 
I don't mean the verses that just have been read. 
But the ones in my pocket, and so, if you please. 
You shall hear them at once if you'll pardon me these." 

Songs in Many Keys, 1862. 

For the Meeting of the National Sanitary Association (1860) 

Proceedings and Debates of the Fourth National Quaran- 
tine and Sanitary Convention, Boston, 1860, pp. 135-136. 
Remarks by O. W. H. on pp. 134-135. 

Songs in Many Keys, 1862. 

For the Moore Centennial Celebration (May £8, 1879) 
The Iron Gate, and Other Poems, 1880. 

For the Services in Memory of Abraham Lincoln 

Memorial Services in Honor of Abraham Lincoln, at Music 

Hall, Boston, June 1, 1865; Order of Services, p. 3. 
A Memorial of Abraham Lincoln, etc., 1865. 
Songs of Many Seasons, 1875. 

For the Window in St. Margaret's (In Memory of a Son 
of Archdeacon Farrar) 
Poems, Riverside Edition, 1891. 

For Whittier»s Seventieth Birthday (Dec. 17, 1877) 

The Iron Gate, and Other Poems, 1880. 
Forbes, John Murray 

See "To J. M. F." 



[ 30 ] 

Fountain of Youth, The (Read at the Meeting of the 
Harvard Alumni Association, June 25, 1873) 
Atlantic Monthly, Aug., 1873, vol. 32, pp. 209-210. 
Songs of Many Seasons, 1875. 

Freedom, our Queen 

Songs in Many Keys, 1862. 

From a Bachelor*s Private Journal 

The Amateur, July 3, 1830, no. 2, p. 22. 
The Harbinger, 1833, pp. 39-40. 
Poems, 1836. 

Garfield, President, On the Death of 

See "On the Death of President Garfield." 

* Gipsy, The 

The Amateur, June 15, 1830, no. 1, p. 13. In "Annual Exhi- 
bition of Paintings . " 

Girdle of Friendship, The (Read at the Class Meeting, 
Jan. 10, 1884) 
Atlantic Monthly, March, 1884, vol. 53, pp. 386-387. 
Before the Curfew, and Other Poems, 1888. 
Latest Poems of the Class of 1829, 1890, pp. 213-214. 

God Save the Flag 

Atlantic Monthly, Jan., 1865, vol. 15, p. 115. 
Songs of Many Seasons, 1875. 

Golden Flower, The 

Poems, Riverside Edition, 1891. 

Good Time Going, A 

Atlantic Monthly, July, 1858, vol. 2, pp. 244-245, in the 

"Autocrat." 
Autocrat of the Breakfast-Table, 1858, pp. 259-261. 
Songs in Many Keys, 1862. 

Printed in the Canadian Journal of Agriculture, July, 1858, 
vol. 3, pp. 365-367, under the title "Britain and America," which 



4 
Good-by, A. To J. R. Lowell (April 29, 1855) 

Songs in Many Keys, 1862. 

See "A Farewell to J. R. Lowell." 

Gould, Dr. Benjamin Apthorp, A Welcome to 

See "A Welcome to Dr. Benjamin Apthorp Gould." 

* Graduate's Song, The 

The Collegian, July, 1830, no. 6, p. 282. 
Grandmother's Story of Bunker Hill Battle 

Memorial, Bunker Hill, 1875, pp. 1-4 (pages unnumbered).^ 

Proceedings of Mass. Historical Society, May 13, 1875, vol. 
14, pp. 33-36. 

Poems, Household Edition, 1877. 

A Memorial of the American Patriots who fell at the Battle 
of Bunker Hill, June 17, 1775. With an account of the 
Dedication of the Memorial Tablets on Winthrop Square, 
Charlestown, June 17, 1889, etc., pp. 245-250. 

Gray Chief, The (1859) 

Songs in Many Keys, 1862. 

Grisette, La 

American Monthly Magazine, April, 1836, n. s. vol. 1, p. 

377. 
Poems, 1836. 

Hail, Columbia ! (Additional Verses, written at the request 
of the Committee for the Constitutional Centennial Cele- 
bration at Philadelphia, 1887) 
Poems, Riverside Edition, 1891. 

Halleck [Fitz-Greene] Monument, Dedication of 

See "Poem at the Dedication," etc. 

^ This is a quarto pamphlet of 16 unnumbered pages ; ornamental 
cover and title-page combined: view of Bunker Hill on inside of front 
cover; poem, "The Crossed Swords," by N. L. Frothingham, on inside of 
back cover; cut of monument on back cover; pictorial borders to all the 
pages, and numerous portraits and cuts. Boston, James R. Osgood and Co. 
On page 1 is the followmg note : " As this poem is written expressly 
for this Memorial and not intended for publication elsewhere, the Pub- 
lishers request that it be not copied or reprinted." 



[ 32 ] 

Harvard (Read at the Commencement Dinner, 1880) 
Poems, Cambridge Edition, 1895. 

Harvard: Two Sonnets — Christo et Ecclesise: Veritas 

Leaflet. 

Proceedings of the Harvard Club of New York City at their 

12th annual dinner, held at Delmonico's, Feb. 21, 1878, 

p. 16.1 
The Iron Gate, and Other Poems, 1880. 

Harvard College, Alumni of 

See "Meeting of the Alumni," etc., "The Old Cruiser," and 
"Vestigia Quinque Retrorsum." 

Harvard College, Centennial Celebration of 

See "A Song for the Centennial," etc. 
Harvard College, Two Hundred and Fiftieth Anniversary of 

See "Poem for the Two Hundred and Fiftieth Anniversary," 
etc. 

* Hast thou a look for me, love? 

[Buckingham's] New England Magazine, Oct., 1831, vol. 1, 
p. 319, in "A Week of Frailty." 

Hayes, Rutherford Burchard 
See "To R. B. H." 

Hedge, Frederick Henry 

See "To Frederick Henry Hedge." 

Height of the Ridiculous, The 

The Collegian, July, 1830, no. 6, pp. 285-286. 
Poems, 1836. 

Home 

Exercises in celebrating the Two Hundred and Fiftieth Anni- 
versary of the Settlement of Cambridge, Dec. 28, 1880 
(1881), pp. 33-35. 

See "Our Home — Our Country." 

1 On pp. 16-17 of the same pamphlet is a letter of Dr. Holmes to Mr. 
John O. Sargent, which is printed also in Mr. Morse's Life and Letters of 
O. W. H., vol. i, pp. 236-238. 



[33] 

Homesick in Heaven 

Atlantic Monthly, January, 1872, vol. 29, pp. 103-104, in the 

"Poet." 
Poet at the Breakfast-Table, 1872, pp. 87-40. 
Songs of Many Seasons, 1875. 

Hot Season, The 
Poems, 1836. 

* " * How came I here? ' The Portrait thus might speak " 

Boston Medical and Surgical Journal, May 5, 1892, vol. 126, 

pp. 451-452. 
See Appendix, pp. 306-309, infra. 

How not to Settle It (Read to the Class, Jan. 4, 1877) 
Atlantic Monthly, Feb., 1877, vol. 39, pp. 257-259. 
Poems, Household Edition, 1877. 

Additional Songs and Poems of the Class of 1829, 1881, pp. 
168-173. 

How the Old Horse won the Bet. Dedicated by a con- 
tributor to The Collegian, 1830, to the Editors of the 
Harvard Advocate, 1876. 

Atlantic Monthly, July, 1876, vol. 38, pp. 44-48. 

Poems, Household Edition, 1877. 

New Verses from the Harvard Advocate, privately printed 
[1886], pp. xv-xxii.^ 

On page xxiii of the volume last cited is the following note: 
"*How the Old Horse Won the Bet,' was read at one of the 
Advocate dinners. Mr. Lowell and Harvard's poets, of the 
Advocate staff, were upon the course that day, to bestow the 
palm on 'The same that drew the One Hoss Shay.' . . . We all 

^ In the Harvard Advocate, May 26, 1876, vol. 16, p. 88, is an account 
of the decennial dinner, on May 11, by Charles H. Barrows, in which we 
find the following reference to this poem: — 

"Dr. Holmes, ... to the surprise and gratification of all, finished his 
speech by producing a poem, prepared for the occasion, which he read in 
the happiest way, interrupted at various points by applause. The subject 
was *The Old Horse,' a sequel to the 'Wonderful One-Hoss Shay,' the 
leading character being the horse instead of the *shay.' The author's 
native humor was well-sustained throughout his verses, and one or two 
local hits were especially appreciated." 



[ 34 ] 

thank the Doctor for this, and for much besides. The Doctor 
is the dear and ever-young colleague of all Harvard editors. 
With them, perennially, 

*He steps a five-year-old again.* 
Our founders, the Class of 1867, have a closer bond with Dr. 
Holmes, in the common memory of one vs^hom it will be always 
of good cheer to remember.'* 

The last reference is to Dr. Holmes's younger son, Edward 
Jackson Holmes, of the Class of 1867, who died in 1884. 

In the Harvard Graduates' Magazine for June, 1906, vol. 14, 
p. 600, Mr. T. T. Baldwin says (" Forty Years of the Harvard 
Advocate ") : "It is related that a few days after the dinner two 
of the editors waited upon the genial doctor and asked permis- 
sion to print the verses in the Advocate, to which request he re- 
plied: * Young gentlemen, that poem might do to read before 
your board, but I hardly think it worthy a place in your columns.' 
It appeared two months later in the Atlantic.** 

Howe, Dr. Samuel G. 

See "A Memorial Tribute." 

Hudson, The. After a Lecture at Albany (Dee., 1854) 
Songs in Many Keys, 1862. 

Humboldt's Birthday. Centennial Celebration, Sept. '14, 
1869 

Songs of Many Seasons, 1875. 

Originally appeared, under the title "Bonaparte, August 15, 
1769 — Humboldt, September 14, 1769,*' in Atlantic Monthly, 
Dec, 1869, vol. 24, pp. 637-638. 

Hymn — After the Emancipation Proclamation 

Songs of Many Seasons, 1875. 
Hymn : The Word of Promise 

See " The Word of Promise.*' 

Hymn at the Funeral Services of Charles Sumner (April 
29, 1874) 

A Memorial of Charles Sumner, from the City of Boston, 

1874, pp. 76-77. 
Songs of Many Seasons, 1875. 



r 



[35] 

Hymn [for the Class Meeting] (Written for the Class, and 
sung at their meeting, Jan. 6, 1869) 
Broadside, 8vo, pp. 2. Poem on page 1, dated Jan. 6, 1869, 

and signed O. W. H. 
Songs of Many Seasons, 1875. 
Additional Songs and Poems of the Class of 1829, 1881, p. 124 . 

Hymn for the Dedication of Memorial Hall at Cambridge 
(June 23, 1874) 
Harvard Book, 1875, vol. ii, p. 54. 
Songs of Many Seasons, 1875. 

There is in the archives of Harvard College a manuscript 
record of the "Proceedings of the Committee of Fifty upon the 
subject of a Memorial Hall, appointed July 19th, 1865." It 
contains the order of exercises and the poems. 
Hymn for the Fair at Chicago (1865) 

Songs of Many Seasons, 1875. 
Hymn for the Inauguration of the Statue of Governor Andrew 
Poems, Household Edition, 1877. 

A Memorial Volume containing the exercises at the dedication 
of the Statue of John A. Andrew at Hingham, Oct. 8, 1875 
(1878), p. 73. 
Hynm for the Laying of the Comer- Stone of Harvard 
Memorial Hall (Oct. 6, 1870) 

Hansard College, services on the laying of the corner-stone, 

etc., 1870. 
Harvard Book, 1875, vol. ii, p. 56. 
Songs of Many Seasons, 1875. 

Hymn for the Two Hundredth Anniversary of King's Chapel 
Programme of the Commemoration by King's Chapel, Boston, 
of the Completion of Two Hundred Years since its Founda- 
tion, on Wednesday, December 15, 1886. 
The Commemoration, etc., 1887, p. 60. 
Poems, Riverside Edition, 1891. 

Hymn of Peace, A (Sung at the Jubilee, June 15, 1869, to 
the Music of Keller's American Hymn) 

Grand National Peace Jubilee and Musical Festival. OflScial 

Programme for the First Day, June 15, 1869, p. 4. 
Songs of Many Seasons, 1875. 



[36] 

Bymn of Trust, A 

Atlantic Monthly, Nov., 1859, vol 4, pp. 633-634, in the 

"Professor." 
Professor at the Breakfast-Table, 1859, p. 356. 
Songs in Many Keys, 1862. 

Hymn read at the Dedication of the Oliver Wendell Holmes 
Hospital at Hudson, Wisconsin, 1887 
Poems, Riverside Edition, 1891. 

The compiler has been informed by Dr. I. D. Wiltrout, for- 
merly of Hudson, the founder of the O. W. H. Hospital at 
that place, that he is the possessor of a considerable number of 
letters from Dr. Holmes (preceding and following the composi- 
tion of this poem), none of which have been published. The 
Hospital has ceased to be called by its original name, and is 
now known as "The Sanatorium." 

Hymn written for the Great Central Fair at Philadelphia 
Our Daily Fare,^ Philadelphia, June 8, 1864, no. 1, p. 7. 
Poems, Cambridge Edition, 1895. 
Not in Riverside Edition. 

Hymn written for the Twenty-Fifth Anniversary of the Re- 
organization of the Boston Young Men's Christian Union, 
May 31, 1893 

Leaflet, 8vo. 

Poems, Cambridge Edition, 1895. 

Not in Riverside Edition. 

* " I cannot say if truth there be " 

[Buckingham's] New England Magazine, March, 1832, vol. 2, 
p. 227, in "The Debut." 

I cannot say if truth there be 

In that fantastic tale 
About the bargain made between 

The toad and nightingale; — 
But thou — if thou hast ever called 

One heavenly gift thine own — 

^ A newspaper published daily during the Fair, June 8-21, 1864. 



[37] 

Hast let it go, and kept unsold 
Thine ugliness alone. 

O would the blazing chandelier, 

That lights each hideous line, 
But save its rays for eyes that beam 

And cast its shade on thine! 
O would the laboring echoes cease 

Thine accents to repeat! 
Thou wert in shadow doubly fair, 

In silence doubly sweet! 

I Like You and I Love You 

Atlantic Monthly, May, 1890, vol. 65, p. 703, in "Over the 

Teacups." 
Over the Teacups, 1890, pp. 144-145. 
Poems, Riverside Edition, 1891. 

* Idle Boys, The 

The Amateur, June 15, 1830, no. 1, p. 13, in "Annual Exhi- 
bition of Paintings." 

Illustration of a Picture 
Poems, 1836. 

Impromptu, An (Read at the Walcker Dinner on the com- 
pletion of the Great Organ for Boston Music Hall, 1863) 
Poems, Cambridge Edition, 1895. 
Not in Riverside Edition. 

Impromptu, An — Not Premeditated (Written for the Class 
Meeting, Nov. 29, 1853) 
Songs of the Class of 1829, 1854, p. 10. 
Poems, Household Edition, 1877. 

* " In gentle bosoms tried and true " 

Life of Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, by Samuel Longfellow, 

1886, vol. iii, p. 85. 
H. W. L.'s Journal, Feb. 27, 1867. Longfellow*s sixtieth 
birthday. "At supper Holmes read these lines: 

** In gentle bosoms tried and true 
How oft the thought will be. 



[38] 

* Dear friend, shall I remember you, ■ 
Or you remember me ? ' 

" But thou, sweet singer of the West, 
Whose song in every zone 
Has soothed some aching grief to rest 
And made some heart thine own, 

"Whene'er thy tranquil sun descends, — 
Far, far that evening be, — 
What mortal tongue may count the friends 
That shall remember thee ? " 

In Memoriam 

See "The Old Man Dreams." 

In Memory of J. D. R. 

See " J[ames] D[utton] R[ussell]." 

In Memory of Charles Wentworth Upham, Junior (1860) 
Songs in Many Keys, 1862. 

In Memory of J[ohn] W[are] R[obert] W[are] (Read at the 
Annual Meeting of the Massachusetts Medical Society, 
May 25, 1864) 
Atlantic Monthly, July, 1864, vol. 14, pp. 115-116. 
Boston Medical and Surgical Journal, July 7, 1864, vol. 70, 

p. 467. 
Songs of Many Seasons, 1875. 

In Memory of John Greenleaf Whittier (Dec. 17, 1807- 
Sept. 7, 1892) 

Atlantic Monthly, Nov., 1892, vol. 70, pp. 648-649. 
Poems, Cambridge Edition, 1895. 
Not in Riverside Edition. 

In Response (Breakfast at the Centyry Club, New York, 
May, 1879) 
The Iron Gate, and Other Poems, 1880. 

In the Twilight 

See " Before the Curfew." 



[ 39 ] 

Inconnue, L' 

" Is thy name Mary, maiden fair ? " 
[Buckingham's] New England Magazine, Oct., 1831, vol. 1, 

pp. 316-320, in "A Week of Frailty." 
The Harbinger (1833), pp. 48-49. 
Poems, 1836. 
In last-mentioned volume first printed with the above title. 

* Infelix Senectus 

The Amateur, Sept. 4, 1830, no. 6, p. 95. 
The Gleaner, 1830, pp. 161-162. 

International Ode. Our Father's Land (Sung in unison by 
1200 children of the public schools, at the visit of the 
Prince of Wales to Boston, Oct. 18, 1860) 
The New England Tour of his Royal Highness the Prince of 

Wales, etc., 1860, p. 19. 
Songs in Many Keys, 1862. 

Invita Minerva 

Atlantic Monthly, Nov., 1890, vol. 66, p. 671, in "Over the 

Teacups." 
Over the Teacups, 1890, p. 314. 
Poems, Riverside Edition, 1891. 

* Invocation, An 

The Collegian, May, 1830, no. 4, pp. 199-200. 

Iris, her Book 

Atlantic Monthly, Oct., 1859, vol. 4, p. 500, in the "Professor." 
Professor at the Breakfast-Table, 1859, pp. 285-287. 
Songs in Many Keys, 1862. 

Iron Gate, The (Read at the Breakfast given in honor of 
Dr. Holmes's Seventieth Birthday by the Publishers of 
the Atlantic Monthly, Dec. 3, 1879) 

Atlantic Monthly, Feb., 1880, vol. 45, supp. pp. 4-5. 

The Iron Gate, and Other Poems, 1880. 

A ms. copy of the poem, in Dr. Holmes's hand and ini- 
tialed by him, brought $50.00 at the Williamson Sale in March, 
1904. 



[40] 

Island Himting-Song, The 

Poems, 1849, 2d issue. 

Printed under the title " Song," in Verses from the Island 
Book, 1865. 

"The island referred to is a domain of princely proportions, 
which has long been the seat of a generous hospitality. Naushon 
is its old Indian name. William Swain, Esq., conmaonly known as 
*the Governor,* was the proprietor of it at the time when this 
song was written." — Note of Dr. Holmes in Riverside Edition. 

Island Ruin, The 

Songs in Many Keys, 1862. 
Poems, Household Edition, 1877. 

See "The Exile's Secret," "Each Heart has its own Secret," 
and "Readings over the Teacups." 
Japanese Embassy, At the Banquet to the 
See "At the Banquet," etc. 

* Jubilee, The 

The Boatswain's Whistle (pubKshed at the National Sailors' 

Fair), Nov. 15, 1864, no. 5, p. 37. 
Humorous Poems, 1865. 

King's Chapel (Read at the Two Hundredth Anniversary) 
Atlantic Monthly, Sept., 1883, vol. 52, pp. 322-323. 
The Commemoration, etc., 1887, pp. 131-133. 
This is the first publication of this poem in a book, although 
it was not written for the anniversary. 
Poems, Riverside Edition, 1891. 

* Lady Drinking (The Athenaeum Gallery) 

The Amateur, June 15, 1830, no. 1, p. 16. 

Last Blossom, The 

Atlantic Monthly, May, 1858, vol. 1, p. 877, in the" Autocrat." 
Autocrat of the Breakfast-Table, 1858, pp. 186-187. 
Songs in Many Keys, 1862. 

Last Charge, The (Read at Class Meeting, Jan. 7, 1864) 
Atlantic Monthly, Feb., 1864, vol. 13, p. 244. 
Songs and Poems of the Class of 1829, 1868, pp. 77-78. 
Songs of Many Seasons, 1875. 



[41] 

A signed copy of this poem, in Dr. Holmes's hand, dated 
Jan. 7, 1864, brought $16.00 at auction, in May, 1895. 

Last Leaf, The 

The Amateur, March 26, 1831, no. 17, p. 261. Signed 

O. W. H. 
The Harbinger, 1833, pp. 34-36. 
The Laurel, 1836. 
Knickerbocker, or New York Monthly Magazine, Feb., 1836, 

vol. 7, p. 219. 
In a review of The Laurel, where "The Last Leaf" is 
described as an "oddly-pathetic poem, by O. W. Holmes 
Esq., a fine prose-writer, and no mean poet." 
Poems, 1836. 

Last Look, The. W. W. Swain 

Atlantic Monthly, Nov., 1858, vol. 2, p. 749. 

Songs in Many Keys, 1862. 

Verses from the Island Book, 1865. 

Written at Naushon in September, 1858. W. W. Swain was 
the son of the "Governor" Swain to whom an earlier poem was 
addressed. See " To Governor Swain." 

* Last Prophecy of Cassandra, The 

The Collegian, March, 1830, no. 2, pp. 55-56. 

Poems, 1836. 

Poems, Cambridge Edition, 1895. 

Not in Household or Riverside Edition. 

Last Reader, The 

American Monthly Magazine, April, 1836, n. s. vol. 1, pp. 

372-373. 
Poems, 1836. 

In the magazine "corroding" was substituted for "sarcastic" 
in the third line of the third stanza: 

"Or o'er them his sarcastic thread;" 
" changed by the New York editor on his own responsibility," 
says Dr. Holmes,' "which occasioned immense indignation on 
my part, and a refusal to write imtil he would promise to keep 
hands off." 

1 In a letter to J. F. Clarke, of May 11, 1836, printed by Mr. Morse in 
his Life and Letters of Dr. Holmes, vol. ii, p. 270. 



[42] 

Last Survivor, The (Read at Class Meeting, Jan. 10, 1878) 
The Iron Gate, and Other Poems, 1880. 
Additional Songs and Poems of the Class of 1829, 1881, pp. 
176-180. 

Latter-Day Warnings 

Atlantic Monthly, Nov., 1857, vol. 1, p. 57, in the "Auto- 
crat." 
Autocrat of the Breakfast-Table, 1858, pp. 26-27. 
Songs in Many Keys, 1862. 

Lexington 

Poems, 1849, 2d issue. 

Lincoln, Abraham 

See " For the Services in Memory of Abraham Lincoln.*' 

Lines (Written for the Class Meeting, 1860)> 

Songs and Poems of the Class of 1829, 1868, pp. 41-42. 
Poems, Household Edition, 1877. 

Lines by a Clerk 
Poems, 1836. 

First appeared in the Amateur (see below), under the title, 
"Lines by a Very Interesting Young Man." 

Lines by a Very Interesting Young Man 

The Amateur, April 9, 1831, no. 18, p. 273, signed O. W. H. 
The Harbinger, 1833, pp. 42-43. 

Lines recited at the Berkshire Festival 

The Berkshire Jubilee, celebrated atPittsfield, Mass., August 

22 and 23, 1864, pp. 162-163. 
Dr. Holmes's copy of this volume was sold by Bangs in June, 
1899, for $4.50. 
Poems, London, 1846. 

Lines recited at the Cambridge Phi Beta Kappa Dinner 

[1844] 

Poems, London, 1846. 

^ At this meeting of the Class, seven original poems were read by 
different members. 



[43] 

See "Verses for After-Dinner.'* 

Dr. John Pierce wrote in his diary, concerning this meeting 
of the Phi Beta Kappa : " One of the most hmnorous of the 
jeus [sic] d'esprit was from the pen of Dr. O. W. Hohnes.*' 
(Proceedings of the Mass. Hist. Soc, 2d series, vol. 9, p. 137.) 

Lines written at Sea 

See Appendix, p. 309, infra. 

Living Temple, The 

Atlantic Monthly, May, 1858, vol. 1, pp. 882-883, in the 

"Autocrat." 
Autocrat of the Breakfast-Table, 1858, pp. 202-203. 
Songs in Many Keys, 1862. 

Longfellow, Henry Wadsworth 

See " In gentle bosoms, tried and true," " Our Dead 
Singer," and "To H. W. Longfellow." 

* Lost Boy, The 

The Token, 1831, pp. 27-28. 

How sweet to boyhood's glowing pulse 
The sleep that languid summer yields. 

In the still bosom of the wild, 
Or in the flowery fields! 

So art thou slumbering, lonely boy — 

But ah! how Kttle deemest thou 
The hungry felon of the wood 

Is glaring on thee now! 

He crept along the tangled glen. 

He panted up the rocky steep. 
He stands and howls above thy head, 

And thou art still asleep! 

No trouble mars thy peaceful dream; 

And though the arrow, winged with death, 
Goes glancing near thy thoughtless heart. 

Thou heedest not its breath. 

Sleep on! the danger all is past, 

The watch-dog, roused, defends thy breast. 

And well the savage prowler knows 
He may not break thy rest I 



[44] 

Lover's Secret, The 

Poems, Riverside Edition, 1891, in "Readings over the Tea- 
cups. " 
Poems, Cambridge Edition, 1895. 

Originally printed under the title "The Mysterious Illness," 
as one of the group, Pictures from Occasional Poems, in Songs 
in Many Keys, 1862, and still so printed in the Household 
Edition. See " Each Heart has its own Secret." 

Loving-Cup Song, A (Read at the Class Meeting, Jan. 4, 
1883) 
Atlantic Monthly, March, 1883, vol. 51, pp. 349-350. 
Before the Curfew, and Other Poems, 1888. 
Latest Poems of the Class of 1829, 1890, pp. 211-212. 

Lowell, James Russell, 1819-1891 
Leaflet, 8vo. 

Atlantic Monthly, Oct., 1891, vol. 68, pp. 552-553. 
Poems, Riverside Edition, 1891.^ 

A copy of the leaflet, with Dr. Holmes's autograph, brought 
$8.00 at the WiUiam Harris Ai-nold Sale in 1901. 

" Lucy." For her Golden Wedding, Oct. 18, 1875 
Poems, Household Edition, 1877. 

L3n:e of Anacreon, The (Read at the Class Meeting, Jan. 8, 
1885) 

Before the Curfew, and Other Poems, 1888. 

Latest Poems of the Class of 1829, 1890, pp. 217-219. 

Originally appeared, under the title " The Old Song, " in the 
Atlantic Monthly, April, 1885, vol. 55, pp. 533-534, in " The 
New Portfolio " [" A Mortal Antipathy "]. 

Maison d'Or, La (Bar Harbor) 

Atlantic Monthly, May, 1890, vol. 65y p. 703, in " Over the 

Teacups. " 
Over the Teacups, 1890, p. 172. 
Poems, Riverside Edition, 1891. 

* For other poems concerning IVIr. Lowell, or addressed to him, see "At 
a Birthday Festival," "A Farewell to J. R. Lowell," "To J. R. Lowell," 
" To J. R. L.," "To James Russell Lowell." 



[45] 

Mare Rubrum (Written for the Annual Meeting of the Class 
[Jan. 14], 1858) 

Atlantic Monthly, March, 1858, vol. 1, pp. 624-625, in the 
"Autocrat." 

Autocrat of the Breakfast-Table, 1858, pp. 140-142. 

Songs and Poems of the Class of 1829, 1859, pp. 22-24. 

Songs in Many Keys, 1862. 

The poem as copied in the records of the Class bears no title. 
The following changes were made in the text before it was 
printed in the Atlantic. In stanza 6, line 5, wondrous was 
changed to maddening ; ^ and in stanza 7, Hue 5, tasteless to 
'palest. 

Martha. Died Jan. 7, 1861 
Songs in Many Keys, 1862. 

Massachusetts Medical Society, Centennial Dinner of the 
See " Poem for the Centennial Dinner," etc. 

Meeting of the Alumni of Harvard College, 1857 
Songs in Many Keys, 1862. 

Meeting of the Dryads, The 

The Collegian, June, 1830, no. 5, pp. 221-223. 
Poems, 1836. 

Written after a general pruning of the trees around Harvard 
CoUege. 

Memorial Hall, Cambridge 

See "Hymn for the Laying of the Corner-Stone " and "Hynm 
for the Dedication of Memorial Hall." 

Memorial Tribute, A (Read at the meeting, Feb. 8, 1876, 
in memory of Dr. Samuel G. Howe) 
The Massachusetts Philanthropist. Memoir of Dr. Samuel 

Gridley Howe, etc., 1876, pp. 89-91. 
Atlantic Monthly, April, 1876, vol. 37, pp. 464-466. 
Poems, Household Edition, 1877. 

* Wondrous was afterward restored and is now the usual reading, except 
in the " Autocrat." 



[46] 

M[eriam], H[oratio] C[ook], H[oward] S[argent], J[osiah] 
K[endall] W[aite] (Written for the Class Meeting, Jan. 9, 
1873) 

Songs of Many Seasons, 1875. 

Additional Songs and Poems of the Class of 1829, 1881, pp. 

153-155. 
In last-mentioned volume printed with no other title than 
"Lines." 

Midsummer 

Atlantic Monthly, Sept., 1859, vol. 4, pp. 378-379, in the 

"Professor." 
Professor at the Breakfast-Table, 1859, pp. 284-285. 
Songs in Many Keys, 1862. 

Mind's Diet, The 

Songs in Many Keys, 1862. 
See note to " Spring." 

Modest Request, A. Complied with after the dinner at 
President Everett's Inauguration [1846] 

Poems, 1849. 

Dr. Holmes's " hiunorous poem " at this dinner is mentioned 
but not printed in Addresses at the Inauguration of the Hon. 
Edward Everett, LL.D., as President of the University at Cam- 
bridge, Thursday, April 30, 1846, Appendix, p. 61. The records 
of the Class of '29 contain a newspaper print of the poem, cut 
from the Boston Daily Advertiser. 

* Moonshine 

The Collegian, July, 1830, no. 6, p. 277. 
The Harbinger (1833), pp. 59-60. 

Moral Bully, The 

Songs in Many Keys, 1862. ' 

See note to "Spring." 

Morning Visit, The ^ 

The Boston Book, 1850, pp. 89-92. 
Poems, Riverside Edition, 1891. 

* See Memoir of Dr. James Jackson, by James Jackson Putnam, 1905, 
pp. 164-166. 



r^ 



[47] 

Mother's Secret, A 

Atlantic Monthly, June, 1859, vol. 3, pp. 619-620, in the 

** Professor." 
Professor at the Breakfast-Table, pp. 159-163. 
Songs in Many Keys, 1862. 
Poems, Household Edition, 1877. 

Mother's Secret, The 

Poems, Riverside Edition, 1891. 

Poems, Cambridge Edition, 1895. 

Originally printed, under the title " A Mother's Secret," as 
above, and still so printed in the Household Edition. See " Each 
Heart has its own Secret." 

Motley, J. L., A Parting Health to 

See "A Parting Health to J. L. Motley." 
Musa 

Atlantic Monthly, Aug., 1858, vol. 2, pp. 369-370, in the 
"Autocrat." 

Autocrat of the Breakfast-Table, 1858, pp. 290-292. 

Songs in Many Keys, 1862. 

Music-Grinders, The 
Poems, 1836. 

Printed under the title "Banditti" in the New England 
Galaxy, 1830, and in the Gleaner of the same date. The 
editor of the Cambridge Edition gives 1836 as the conjectural 
date of composition. The second Hue of stanza 4 originally 
read "Some filthy creature begs;" in the Household Edition, 
flthy was changed to odious. 

My Annual. For the " Boys of '29 " (At Annual Meeting, 
Jan. 4, 1866) 

Atlantic Monthly, April, 1866, vol. 17, pp. 395-396. 
Songs and Poems of the Class of 1829, 1868, pp. 84-86. 
Songs of Many Seasons, 1875. 

My Aunt 

[Buckingham's] New England Magazine, Oct., 1831, vol. 1, 

p. 433. 
The Harbinger, 1833, pp. 44-46. 
Poems, 1836. 



[48] 

My Aviary 

Atlantic MontUy, Jan., 1878, vol. 41, pp. 122-125. 
The Iron Gate, and Other Poems, 1880. 

Mysterious Illness, The 

Songs in Many Keys, 1862. 
Poems, Household Edition, 1877. 

See "The Lover's Secret," "Each Heart has its own 
Secret," and "Readings over the Teacups." 

Mysterious Visitor, The 

The Collegian, June, 1830, no. 5, pp. 212-214. 

Poems, 1836. 

In the last-named volume the last word of the title is spelled 

visiter. 

Nearing the Snow-Line 

Atlantic Monthly, Jan., 1870, vol. 25, p. 86. 
Songs of Many Seasons, 1875. 

Never or Now! An Appeal . 

Lyrics of Loyalty, 1864, pp. 241-242. 
Songs of Many Seasons, 1875. 

New Eden, The (Read before the Berkshire Horticul- 
tural Society at Stockbridge, Sept. 13, 1854) 

Songs in Many Keys, 1862. 

The Poet among the Hills (J. E. A. Smith), 1895, pp. 146-150. 

New England Society in New York, the, Semi-Centennial 
Celebration of 
See " Semi-Centennial Celebration," etc. 

New York Mercantile Library Association, Annual Dinner of 
See "Song, written for the Annual Dinner," etc. 

No Tune Uke the Old Tune 

Atlantic Monthly, Sept., 1865, vol. 16, pp. 398-399. 
Poems, Riverside Edition, 1891. 

Non-Resistance 

Songs in Many Keys, 1862. 
See note to "Spring." 



[ 49 ] 

Noontide Lyric, A 

Poems, 1836. 

Originally appeared, under the title "Poultry," in the Ama- 
teur, July 3, 1830, no. 2, p. 25. 

Nux Postcoenatica 

Poems, 1849. , 

* Octosyllabics 

The Collegian, July, 1830, no. 6, pp. 261-263. 
Ode for a Social Meeting [with Slight Alterations by a 
Teetotaler] 

Atlantic Monthly, Dec., 1857, vol. l,p. 184, in the " Autocrat. " 

Autocrat of the Breakfast-Table, 1858, p. 53. 

Songs in Many Keys, 1862. 

In last-named volume first printed with title. 

Ode for Washington's Birthday (Mercantile Library Asso- 
ciation, Feb. 22, 1856) 
Songs in Many Keys, 1862. 

Old Cambridge 

Proceedings, July 3, 1875, in celebration of the Centennial 
Anniversary of Washington's taking Command of the Con- 
tinental Army on Cambridge Common, 1875, pp. 88-91.^ 

Atlantic Monthly, Aug., 1875, vol. 36, pp. 237-239. 

Laurel Leaves, 1876 [c. 1875], pp. 167-175. 

Poems, Household Edition, 1877. 

Old Cruiser, The (Written for the Class Meeting, Jan. 6, 1869) 
Songs of Many Seasons, 1875. 

* This poem was read at the dinner in Memorial Hall, following the 
formal exercises, at which Mr. Lowell read his "Under the Old Elm." 
When Mr. Lowell was called upon to respond to the toast, "The Poet 
of the Day," he introduced Dr. Holmes, to "respond to the spirit of the 
toast." Dr. H. prefaced the reading of the poem with the following remarks : 

"Ladies and Gentlemen, — I know you will not accuse me of lightly or 
wantonly taking the compliment to myself, when you have sat to-day and 
listened to my friend's inspiring poem; and I should hesitate to read the 
few verses I have here, were it not that one was before and the other after 
dinner. I have addressed the gray heads and bald heads of this assembly 
more particularly, asking if they can tell where some of the old familiar 
places in this innnediate vicinity are." 



[50] 

Additional Songs and Poems of the Class of 1829, 1881, pp. 
125-128. 

The last four stanzas "were added and the completed lines 
read at the dinner of the Alumni, Commencement Day, June 
29, 1869." 

In the class publication, the title is "Lines," simply. 

* Old Gentleman>s Story, The 

The Collegian, July, 1830, no. 6, pp. 277-279. 
Old Ironsides 

Boston Daily Advertiser, Sept. 16, 1830. 

'* One genuine lyric outburst, done in this year of the law, almost 
made him in a way actually famous. The frigate Constitution, 
historic indeed, but old and unseaworthy, then lying in the navy 
yard at Charlestown, was condemned by the Navy Department 
to be destroyed. Holmes read this in a newspaper paragraph, 
and it stirred him. On a scrap of paper, with a lead pencil, he 
rapidly shaped the impetuous stanzas of 'Old Ironsides,' and 
sent them to the Daily Advertiser, of Boston. Fast and far they 
travelled through the newspaper press of the country; they were 
even printed in hand-bills and circulated about the streets of 
Washington. An occurrence, which otherwise would probably 
have passed unnoticed, now stirred a national indignation. The 
astonished Secretary made haste to retrace a step which he had 
taken quite innocently in the w^ay of business. The Constitution's 
tattered ensign was not torn down. The ringing spirited verses 
gave the gallant ship a reprieve, which satisfied sentimentality, 
and a large part of the people of the United States had heard of 
O. W. Holmes, law student at Cambridge, who had only come 
of age a month ago." — Life and Letters of O. W. Holmes, by 
J. T. Morse, Jr., vol. i, pp. 79-80.^ 

Poems, 1836, pp. 24-25. 

Here printed as a part of "Poetry : a Metrical Essay," without 

^ Curiously enough, while this compilation was in the making, a similar 
suggestion by the Secretary of the Navy (1905), with reference to the same 
venerable and venerated vessel, inspired a like outburst of popular feeling; 
the matter was made the subject of discussion in Congress, and Dr. Holmes's 
lines were recited dramatically on the floor of the House of Representatives 
by Mr. Sulzer of New York. See Congressional Record, Fifty-Ninth 
Congress, 1st Session, p. 578. See also the remarks of Mr. McCall of Massa- 
chusetts, ibid. p. 1226. 



[51] 

separate title; in the Contents, however, the above title appears 
as a sub-title under "Poetry," which see. 

The Boston Book, 1837, p. 239. 

The poem was first printed separately, under its present title, 
in the Blue and Gold Edition of the Poems, in 1862. 

A copy of "Old Ironsides," in Dr. Hohnes's autograph, 
signed by him, and dated 1842, was sold by Bangs in Nov., 
1900, for $45.00; another, 1 page, 4to, signed, with portrait, for 
$87.00, in the Kennard Sale, April, 1904 ; and an autograph 
letter, including a copy of the poem, for $29.00, in the Carson 
Sale, 1904. 

Old Man Dreams, The 

Atlantic Monthly, Jan., 1858, vol. 1, pp. 319-320, in the 

"Autocrat." 
Autocrat of the Breakfast-Table, 1858, pp. 76-77. 
Songs and Poems of the Class of 1829, 1859, pp. 14-16. 
Songs in Many Keys, 1862. 

This poem was written for and read at the annual meeting of 
the Class of 1829, on Nov. 23, 1854. The secretary of the Class, 
upon spreading it on his records, entitled it " In Memoriam; " but 
in the Songs of the Class of '29, it is called " The Dream." There 
are several variations between the manuscript copy in the Class 
records and the poem as printed: 

Stanza 2,Kne 4, ms., has glories for trophies ; stanza 4, line 2, 
smiling calmly for calmly smiling ; stanza 6 reads in the ms. : 
"Nay — since you call it tb my mind, 
One thing in manhood's life 
I should not care to leave behind, 
I think I '11 take — my wife. " 
Stanza 7, line 3, ms., has youth for hoy ; stanza 8, line 1, ms., 
has still for yet ; Une 3, ms., has thy past haSy for these gifts have ; 
last stanza reads in the ms.: 

"And so I laughed, and, laughing, woke 
From dreams of fancied joys; 
And came to tell the Angel's joke 
Among us gray-haired boys." 

Old Man of the Sea, The. A Nightmare Dream by Daylight 
Atlantic Monthly, Nov., 1858, vol. 2, pp. 743-744, in "A Visit 
to the Autocrat's Landlady." 



[52] 

Songs in Many Keys, 1862. 

The original ms. of the " Visit, " including the poem, 22 pp. 
4to, brought $195.00 at the Williamson Sale, in March, 1904; 
at the same sale, 2 leaves, containing the first draft of the poem, 
beginning with the 2d stanza, signed, brought $41,50. 

Old Player, The 

Songs in Many Keys, 1862. 

See " Each Heart has its own Secret." 

Old Song, The 

Atlantic Monthly, April, 1885, vol. 55, pp. 533-534, in "The 

New PortfoKo." 
A Mortal Antipathy; First Opening of the New Portfolio, 

1885, pp. 85-86. 
Read to the Class of 1829, Jan. 8, 1885, and printed in 
Before the Curfew, and Other Poems, 1888, and all subsequent 
collected editions, under the title, "The Lyre of Anacreon." 

Old Tune, The. Thirty-Sixth Variation (Read at the Class 
Meeting, Jan. 7, 1886.) 

Atlantic Monthly, March, 1886, vol. 57, p. 373, in "Two 
'Occasional' Poems with an Introduction'* (The New 
PortfoHo). 
Before the Curfew, and Other Poems, 1888. 
Latest Poems of the Class of 1829, 1890, pp. 219-220. 

Old- Year Song, An 

Atlantic Monthly, Jan., 1874, vol. 33, pp. 101-102. 
Songs of Many Seasons, 1875. 

Oliver Wendell Holmes Hospital at Hudson, Wisconsin, 
Hymn read at the Dedication of 
See "Hymn read at the Dedication of," etc. 

On Lending a Punch-Bowl 

Poems, 1849. 

On the Death of President Garfield 
Poems, Riverside Edition, 1891. 

Originally appeared under the title "After the Burial," in 
the 'Boston Globe, Garfield Memorial Niunber, Sept. 17, 
1881. 



[53] 

On the Threshold 

The Iron Gate, and Other Poems, 1880. 

Once More. Condiscipulis, Cooetaneis, Harvardianis, 
Amicis (Written for the Class Meeting, Jan., 1868) 
Atlantic Monthly, March, 1868, vol. 21, pp. 430-431. 
Songs and Poems of the Class of 1829, 1868, pp. 96-99. 
Songs of Many Seasons, 1875. 

One Country (1865) 

Songs of Many Seasons, 1875. 
One-Hoss Shay, The 

See "The Deacon's Masterpiece." 
Only Daughter, The 

The Token and Atlantic Souvenir, 1838, pp. 33-36. 

The Token, or Affection's Gift, 1846, pp. 33-36. 

Poems, London, 1846. 

This poem was omitted — accidentally, it would seem — 
from the first issue of the Poems of 1849 (that which bears the 
imprint of W. D. Ticknor and Co.), but was printed in the 
second issue (Ticknor, Reed and Fields). See the description 
of that edition of the poems, p. 128, injra. 

Opening of the Piano, The 

Atlantic Monthly, March, 1859, vol. 3, pp. 360-361, in the 

"Professor." 
Professor at the Breakfast-Table, 1859, pp. 92-93. 
Songs in Many Keys, 1862. 

Opening the Window 

Songs of Many Seasons, 1875, pp. iii-iv. 

Organ-Blower, The 

Old and New, Jan., 1872, vol. 5, pp. 69-70. 
Songs of Many Seasons, 1875. 

Our Banker (Written for the Class, Jan. 8, 1874) 
Songs of Many Seasons, 1875. 
Additional Songs and Poems of the Class of 1829, 1881, pp. 

156-158. 
In last-mentioned volume printed with no other title than 
"Lines." 



[54] 

Our Classmate, F[rederick] W[illiam] C[rocker] (Written 
for the Class Meeting, Jan. 7, 1864) 
Atlantic Monthly, March, 1864, vol. 13, pp. 329-330. 
Songs and Poems of the Class of 1829, 1868, pp. 73-75. 
Songs of Many Seasons, 1875.* 

Our Dead Singer. H. W. L. 

Atlantic Monthly, June, 1882, vol. 49, pp. 721-722. 
Before the Curfew, and Other Poems, 1888. 

Our First Citizen [Edward Everett] (Read at the Meeting 

of the Massachusetts Historical Society, Jan. 30, 1865) 

Proceedings of the Mass. Hist. Soc. Jan. 30, 1865, vol. 8, p. 

151. 
Tribute of the Mass. Hist. Soc. to the Memory of Edward 

Everett, 1865, pp. 65-67. 
Atlantic Monthly, April, 1865, vol. 15, pp. 462-463. 
Memorial of Edward Everett, from the City of Boston, 1865, 

pp. 189-191. 
Songs of Many Seasons, 1875. 

Our Home — Our Cotmtry 

Poems, Handy Volume Edition, 1881. 

Printed under the title " Home," in Exercises in Celebrat- 
ing the Two Hundred and Fiftieth Anniversary of the Settle- 
. ment of Cambridge, 1880. 

Our Indian Summer (Written for the Class Meeting, 
Nov., 1856) 

Songs and Poems of the Class of 1829, 1859, pp. 20-21. 

The title here is "A Poem," simply. Printed in Songs in 
Many Keys, 1862, under the title "Class of '29 (Nov. 6, 1856)." 
"Our Indian Summer" was first used as title in Poems, House- 
hold Edition, 1877. 

According to the Class records Dr. Holmes read at this same 
meeting of 1856 "a portion of an epic" on the Class, of 
which no trace remains. 

Our Limitations 

Songs in Many Keys, 1862. 
See note to "Spring." 



[55] 

Our Oldest Friend (Read to "The Boys of '29," Jan. 5, 
1865) 
Atlantic Monthly, March, 1865, vol. 15, pp. 340-341. 
Songs and Poems of the Class of 1829, 1868, pp. 80-82. 
Songs of Many Seasons, 1875. 

Our Sweet Singer. J[oseph] A[ngier] (Written for the Class 
Meeting, Jan. 4, 1872) 
Atlantic Monthly, April, 1872, vol. 29, p. 496, in the "Poet." 
Poet at the Breakfast-Table, 1872, pp. 134-135. 
Songs of Many Seasons, 1875. 
Additional Songs and Poems of the Class of 1829, 1881, pp. 

142-144. 
In this latter compilation the poem is printed as in the copy 
spread on the Class records. But as printed in the "Poet," and 
in the collected editions, it shows the following variations from 
its original form: the 3d and 9th stanzas are omitted, and that 
which stands 6th in the revised form — "The cheering smile, 
the voice of mirth," etc. — does not appear in the ms. In the 
5th stanza the ms. has second childhood* s instead of love and 
jriendship^s. 

The 3d stanza in the ms. reads: 

" Clear as the lark at morning's blush 
It filled the springtide bowers; 
Sweet as the vesper-triUing thrush 
It charmed the autumn hours." 
And the 9th: 

"And if, in some great anthem's pause. 
That voice should once begin — 
May Heaven forgive its slighted laws! 
The Boys would all strike in!" 

Our Yankee Girls 

American Monthly Magazine, March, 1836, n. s. vol. 1, p. 292. 

Poems, 1836. 

Boston Book, 1837, pp. 117-118. 

"Our Yankee Girls" was set to music; a copy in sheet music 
form, pubhshed in 1852, was sold at the Pyser Sale, 1906, for 
$3.10; and a copy in the same form, under the title "God Bless 
our Yankee Girls," with music by T. Comer (1854), brought 
$8.00 at Bangs's in April, 1900. 



[56] 

Papyrus Club, At the 

See "At the Papyrus Club." 

Parkman, Francis. Sept. 16, 1823-Nov. 3, 1893 

Proceedings of the Massachusetts Historical Society, Nov. 21, 

1893, 2d series, vol. 8, pp. 360-361. 
Atlantic Monthly, Feb., 1894, vol. 73, pp. 222-223. 
Poems, Cambridge Edition, 1895. 
Not in Riverside Edition. 

Parson TiirelPs Legacy: or The President's Old Arm-Chair. 
A Mathematical Story 
Atlantic Monthly, Oct., 1858, vol. 2, pp. 626-628, in the 

"Autocrat." 
Autocrat of the Breakfast-Table, 1858, pp. 345-349. 
Songs in Many Keys, 1862. 

Parting Health to J. L. Motley, A. On his return to 
England after the publication of the Rise of the Dutch 
Republic 

Autocrat of the Breakfast-Table, 1858, pp. 28-29.^ 

Songs in Many Keys, 1862. 

This poem was read at a farewell dinner to Motley, Aug. 7, 
1857. See Longfellow's Journal of that date in S. Longfellow's 
Life of H. W. L. 

Parting Hymn 

Atlantic Monthly, Aug., 1861, vol. 8, p. 235. 
Songs in Many Keys, 1862, 

Partmg Song, The (1857) (At the Meeting of the Alumni 
of Harvard College) 
Songs in Many Keys, 1862. 
Parting Word, The 

Western Messenger, May, 1838. 
Poems, London, 1846. 

Peabody, George 

See "To George Peabody." 

^ Not included in the "Autocrat" when that work appeared in the 
Atlantic Monthly. 



[57] 

Peau de Chagrin of State Street, The 

Atlantic Monthly, March, 1890, vol. 65, p. 403, in " Over the 

Teacups." 
Over the Teacups, 1890, pp. 73-74. 
Poems, Riverside Edition, 1891. 

Peirce, Benjamin : Astronomer, Mathematician. 1809-1880 ^ 
(Read at the Class Meeting, Jan. 6, 1881) 
Atlantic Monthly, Dec, 1880, vol. 46, pp. 823-824. 
Benjamin Peirce. A Memorial Collection, 1881, pp. 63-64. 
Additional Songs and Poems of the Class of 1829, 1881, pp. 

196-197. 
Poems, Handy Volume Edition, 1881. 

Phi Beta Kappa Society, Harvard 

See "An After-Dinner Poem," "Chanson without Music," 
"A Poem Served to Order, " "Poetry: a Metrical Essay," "Post- 
Prandial," "Terpsichore," "To the Poets who only Read and 
Listen," "Verses for After-Dinner." 

Phi Beta Kappa Society, Yale 

See "Astrsea." 
Philosopher to his Love, The 

The Token and Atlantic Souvenir, 1833, pp. 310-311. 

Poems, 1836. 

Pilgrim*s Vision, The 

C. J. Fox*s History of the Old Township of Dunstable, etc. 
(Nashua), 1846, pp. 51-54. 

W. S. Russell's Guide to Plymouth and Recollections of the 
Pilgrims, 1846, supp. pp. 73-74. 

Poems, 1849. 

The diary of Dr. John Pierce has the following entry concern- 
ing the anniversary celebration of the Landing of the Forefathers 
at Plymouth, Dec. 22, 1845: "Dr. OHver Wendell Holmes next 
read a beautiful poetical effusion suited to the occasion." Dr. 
Pierce copied "The Pilgrim's Vision " in full into his diary. 
(Proceedings of Mass. Hist. Soc, 2d series, vol. 10, pp. 399-400.) 

Pittsfield Cemetery, Dedication of 
See "Poem for the Dedication," etc. 
' Printed in first impression of Riverside Edition, vol. xii, " 1809-1890." 



[58] 

Ploughman, The (Anniversary of the Berkshire Agricul- 
tural Society, Oct. 4, 1849) 

Poems, London, 1852. 

Songs in Many Keys, 1862. 

The Poet among the Hills (J. E. A. Smith), 1895, pp. 132-133. 

In the last-named volume the poem is said to be given as 
originally delivered, and the title is spelled "Plowman." The 
following variations from the text of the poem as now printed 
may be noted. The last two hnes of the 3d stanza read: 

"These are the hnes, oh, Heaven-commanded toil, 
That fill thy deed — the charter of the soil ! " 
Line 12 of the 4th stanza: 

"Round the fresh clasp of thine embracing arms." 
Lines 3-6 of the last stanza: 

" By yon twin crests, amid the sinking sphere. 
Last to dissolve and first to reappear, 
By these fair plains the mountain circle screens, 
And feeds in silence from its dark ravines." 
And the last two Hnes of the poem: 

"Till Greylock thunders to the setting sun. 
The sword has rescued what the ploughshare won." 

Poem at the Dedication of the Halleck Monument (July 
8, 1869) 
8vo leaflet, pp. 4; third and fourth pages blank. 
A copy of the leaflet, with Dr. Holmes's autograph, brought 
$25.00 at the WiUiam Harris Arnold Sale in 1901. 
Songs of Many Seasons, 1875. 

A description of the Dedication of the Monument, erected at 
Guildford, Conn., in honor of Fitz-Greene Halleck (pri- 
vately printed), 1869. See Appendix, p. 309, infra. 

Poem for the Centennial Dinner of the Massachusetts 
Medical Society, June 8, 1881 

Boston Medical and Surgical Journal, June 23, 1881, vol. 104, 

pp. 577-580. 
Poems, Handy Volume Edition, 1881. 

The original ms. of this poem is owned by the Massachu- 
setts Medical Library Association. 



[59] 

Poem for the Dedication of the Fountain at Stratford-on- 
Avon (1887) 
Story of the Memorial Fountain to Shakespeare at Stratford- 
upon-Avon, given by George W. Childs, L. Clarke Davis, 
editor (privately printed), 1890, pp. 41-44.^ 
Poems, Riverside Edition, 1891. 

As originally published in the newspapers, "Blandusia" was 
printed instead of "Bandusia," in hne 4 of the 2d stanza. See 
"After Our Hundred Days," Atlantic Monthly, vol. 61, p. 129. 

Poem for the Dedication of the Pittsfield Ceme- 
tery, A 

An Address by Rev. Henry Neill and a Poem by OKver 
Wendell Holmes, etc., 1850, pp. 55-60. 

A copy of this pamphlet was sold by Bangs, in April, 1897, for 
$5.00. 

Poems, London, 1852. 

Songs in Many Keys, 1862. 

Printed under the title "Woodlawn Cemetery" in Memory 
and Hope, Marian CD. Silsbee, editor, 1851. 

Poem for the Meeting of the American Medical 
Association, A 
Response of Ohver Wendell Holmes, M. D., to the following 
toast, proposed at the Entertainment given to the American 
Medical Association, by the Physicians of the City of New 
York, at Metropohtan Hall, on the 5th of May, 1853. 
Toast. — "The Union of Science and Literature — a 
happy marriage, the fruits of which are nowhere seen to 
better advantage than in our American Holmes." — Broad- 
side, large foho, 1 page. 
Songs in Many Keys, 1862. 

^ On page 22 is the following letter: 
Dear Mr. Childs: 

I have written a poem for the celebration of the opening of the foun- 
tain. There are nine verses, each of nine lines, as it now stands. I mean 
to revise it carefully, transcribe it, and send you the copy in the course of 
the week. 

I have taken pains with it, and I hope you will hke it. Please do not 
take the trouble of replying before you get the poem. 

Always truly yours, 

O. W. Holmes. 



[60] 

Poem for the Two Hundred and Fiftieth Anniversary of 
Harvard College 
Record of the Commemoration, November fifth to eighth, 

1886, etc. (1887), pp. 237-249. 
Atlantic Monthly, Dec, 1886, vol. 58, supp. pp. 18-28. 
Before the Cm^ew, and Other Poems, 1888. 

Poem read at the Dinner given to the Author by the 
Medical Profession of the City of New York 

Proceedings at the Dinner, etc., April 12, 1883, Wesley M. 
Carpenter, editor, 1883, pp. 16-23. 

Poems, Cambridge Edition, 1895. 

A head-note to the group Medical Poems, in the Cambridge 
Edition, states that this poem was accidentally omitted from 
the Riverside Edition. 

Poem Served to Order, A ($. B. K., June 26, 1873) 

Atlantic Monthly, Sept., 1873, vol. 32, pp. 296-297. 
Songs of Many Seasons, 1875. 

Poet to the Readers, The 

Atlantic Monthly, July, 1862, vol. 10, pp. 118-119. 
Poems, Blue and Gold Edition, 1862. 

Printed in this and all subsequent collected editions, as a 
Prelude, under the title, "To my Readers.'* 

Poet's Lot, The 
Poems, 1836. 

First appeared in [Buckingham's] New England Magazine, 
vol. 1, p. 239, under the title, "Thoughts in Dejection." 

* Poet's Reply, The (To a request to contribute to Our 
Daily Fare) 
Our Daily Fare, Philadelphia, June 9, 1864, no. 2, p. 13. 
Why in these breathless sleepless times, 

When every hour is like an age, 
Should poets pair the rusted rhymes 

That climb in every school-boy's page ? 
Are these the days for idle songs ? 

Are these the nights to doze and dream. 



[61] 

When all our fiery manhood throngs 
A perilled nation to redeem ? 

Yet blame not him whose slender tone 

Blends with the stirring battle-call; 
'T was but a crooked ram*s horn blown, — 

Down crushed the Godless heathen's wall! 
A word of cheer may nerve the blow 

That turns the conflict's trembling scale, 
And he that never saw his foe 

May pierce him through his triple mail. 

Poetry : a Metrical Essay (Read before the Phi Beta Kappa 
Society, Harvard University, Aug., 1836) 

Poems, 1836, pp. 3-39. 

Dr. John Pierce, of the Harvard Class of 1793, for many years 
a regular attendant at Commencement and at Phi Beta Kappa 
meetings, left a diary from which copious extracts have been 
pubKshed from time to time in the Proceedings of the Massachu- 
setts Historical Society. He had this to say of the meeting of 
1836: "After a suitable interlude by the band, Oliver Wendell 
Holmes, M. D., of the class of 1829, deKvered a beautiful poem 
of 1 hour and 10 minutes, committed to memory, and uttered with 
charming ease and propriety. It was exceedingly miscellaneous. 
In it he paid a feehng tribute to this as the place of his nativity, 
to some of the most striking objects in his vicinity, and to his 
sister, who in the bloom and beauty of youth was consigned to 
the adjoining cemetery. He took an affectionate notice of Dr. 
James Jackson, Jr.,^ with whom he had studied in Paris, 
and whose early death he deeply deplored. He was often inter- 
rupted by the spontaneous and long continued applauses of the 
Society and of the audience in general." (Mass. Hist. Soc. 
Proceedings, 2d series, vol. 9, p. 127.) See " Lines recited at 
the Cambridge Phi Beta Kappa Dinner " and " The Pilgrim's 
Vision." 

"A few lines, perhaps deficient in dignity," have been, from 
the beginning, omitted from the poem as pubKshed, but printed 
among the "notes." 

^ See Dr. Holmes's letter from Paris to Dr. James Jackson, Senior, in 
Dr. James Jackson Putnam's Memoir of Dr. James Jackson, 1905, pp. 
314-316. 



[62] 



Poetry of Real Life 
See "The FUes." 



Portrait, A 

The Token and Allantic Souvenir, 1833, p. 337. 
Poems, 1836. 

* Portrait of a Lady (The Athenseum Gallery) 
"Lady! I may not see thy face." 
The Amateur, «]ane 15, 1830, no. 1, p. 16. 

Post-Prandial (Phi Beta Kappa, 1881) 

Atlantic Monthly, Sept., 1881, vol. 48, p. 365. 

Poems, Riverside Edition, 1891. 

The orator of the day was Wendell PhilKps and the poet 
Charles Godfrey Leland (Hans Breitmann). An interesting 
letter from Dr. Holmes to Mr. Leland on the subject of the 
latter 's poem and the reception accorded it, may be found in 
Mrs. E. R. Pennell's Charles Godfrey Leland, 1906, vol. ii, 
pp. 116-118. 

Poultry (The Athenseum Gallery) 

The Amateur, July 3, 1830, no. 2, p. 25. 
See "A Noontide Lyric." 

[Prelude] 

"I'm the fellah that tole one day." 
Atlantic Monthly, Oct. , 1858, vol. 2, p. 625, in the " Autocrat. ' ' 
Autocrat of the Breakfast-Table, 1858, p. 344. 
Poems, Cambridge Edition, 1895. 

This introduction to " Parson TurelFs Legacy," alone of 
all the poems in the "Autocrat," was never printed in any 
collection of poems prior to the Cambridge Edition. 

Prelude to a Volume printed in Raised Letters for the Blind 
Selections from the Poetical Works of Dr. Oliver Wendell 
Holmes, in raised letters, Howe Memorial Press, Boston, 
1885, p. V. 
Before the Curfew, and Other Poems, 1888. 

Prelude to Verses from the Island Book 

See p. 208, infra. 



[63] 

President's Old Arm-Chair, The 

See "Parson Turell's Legacy." 
Programme 

Songs of Many Seasons, 1875, pp. iv-vii, dated Oct. 7, 1874. 

[Prologue] 

"A prologue ? Well, of course the ladies know." 
Atlantic Monthly, Dec, 1857, vol. 1, pp. 182-183, in the 

"Autocrat." 
Autocrat of the Breakfast-Table, 1858, pp. 49-52. 
Songs in Many Keys, 1862. 

In last-named volume first printed with title. A portion of 
this poem was printed by Mr. R. W. Emerson in his "Parnas- 
sus" (Boston, 1874), under the title, "Rudolph the Headsman." 

[Prologue] 

" The piping of our slender, peaceful reeds." 
Songs in Many Keys, 1862, p. v. 

Here, and in all collected editions previous to the Riverside, 
1891, printed as a prologue to Songs in Many Keys, but without 
separate title. 

Promise, The 

Songs in Many Keys, 1862. 
Questions and Answers 

Poems of 1849, 2d issue. 

Songs of the Class of 1829, 1854, pp. 10-11. 

In his Life and Letters of Oliver Wendell Holmes, Mr. Morse 
quotes letters of Rev. Samuel May, Secretary of the Class of 
1829, to Dr. Hohnes, as follows: "You regularly began to 
furnish us a poem in 1851, — *The summer dawn is breaking' 
[A Song of Twenty-Nine]." — " From that day to this no class 
meeting of 1829 has been without a poem from you — not one." 
It is true, none the less, that there was no contribution from Dr. 
Hohnes in 1852. "Questions and Answers," which had been 
printed in 1849, was sung by him at the meeting in 1850; it was 
printed among the Class songs in 1854, and in the second edition 
(1859) was relegated to the Appendix, with the words "From 
Dr. Holmes's Poems." In the third edition (1868), it took its 
place as of 1852, although with a slightly different designation 



[64] 

from the other poems ("For the Class, 1852"), and has been so 
printed in all collected editions since 1877, although it was origi- 
nally written much eariier than 1852, and not for the Class. 

Qui Vive 

American Monthly Magazine, Nov., 1836, n. s. vol. 2, pp. 

468-469. 
Poems, 1836. 

Readings over the Teacups. Five Stories and a Sequel 
Poems, Riverside Edition, 1891. 
Poems, Cambridge Edition, 1895. 
To my Old Readers. 
The Banker's Secret. 
The Exile's Secret. 
The Lover's Secret. 
The Statesman's Secret. 
The Mother's Secret. 
The Secret of the Stars. 
There are also interludes between each two of the poems (ex- 
cluding "To my Old Readers"), which had never before been 
printed. See "Each Heart has its own Secret." 

Reflections of a Proud Pedestrian 

The Collegian, May, 1830, no. 4, p. 199. 
Poems, 1836. 

Remember — Forget (Written for the Class Meeting, Jan. 
10, 1856) 
Songs and Poems of the Class of 1829, 1859, pp. 17-19. 
The title here is "Song," simply. 
Poems, Household Edition, 1877. 

Response of Oliver Wendell Holmes to the fol- 
lowing Toast, etc. 

See "Poem for the Meeting of the American Medical Asso- 
ciation," May 5, 1853. 

Rhymed Lesson, A 

See "Urania ; a Rhymed Lesson." 
Rhymed Riddle, A 

Fair Words, 1876. See Appendix, p. 309, infra. 



[65] 

Rhymes of a Life-Time (Aug. 2, 1881) 
Poems, Kiverside Edition, 1891. 

Originally appeared, without title, as a Prelude to Poems, 
Handy Volume Edition, 1881. 

* [Riddle] 

Fair Play, 1875, p. 3. 

This is a book of riddles, compiled for sale at a fair in 
Waltham, Mass. Pamphlet, 16mo, pp. 20. Dr. Holmes's con- 
tribution is Number I ("by permission"). 

My name declares my date to be 

The morning of a Christian year. 
Though motherless, as all agree, 

I am a mother, it is clear; 
A father, too, without dispute, 

And when my son comes, — he 's a fruit. 
And, not to puzzle you too much, 
'T was I gave Holland to the Dutch. 
The answer is "Adam." A copy of Fair Play, with an 
autograph letter from Dr. Holmes inserted, was sold at the 
WilKam Harris Arnold Sale in 1901, for $12.00; another copy 
at the Pyser Sale in 1906, for $11.00. 

Rip Van Winkle, M. D. An After-Dinner Prescription taken 
by the Massachusetts Medical Society, at their meeting 
held May 25, 1870 

Boston Medical and Surgical Journal, June 9, 1870, n. s. 

vol. 5, pp. 444-446.^ 
Songs of Many Seasons, 1875. 

Robinson of Leyden 

Atlantic Monthly, July, 1859, vol. 4, p, 128, in the "Professor." 
Illustrated Pilgrim Almanac for 1860, p. 20. 
Professor at the Breakfast-Table, 1859, pp. 220-221. 
Songs in Many Keys, 1862. 

^ "In placing at the head of the Editor's table the following poem, read 
by O. W. Holmes, at the recent dinner of the Massachusetts Medical 
Society, we attain the object of om* hunger and thirst. We had failed to 
secure it by our own sjren songs of persuasion, though attuned to their 
most dulcet notes. But the following letter from the poet's former friends 
in the profession in Berkshire was too much for his obduracy — and here 
we have it." 



[66] 

Roman Aqueduct, A 
Poems, 1836. 
See "The Claudian Aqueduct." 

* Romance 

The Collegian, March, 1830, no. 2, p. 60. 

Rose, The, and the Fern 

Atlantic Monthly, April, 1890, vol. Q5, p. 560, in " Over the 

Teacups." 
Over the Teacups, 1890, p. 118. 
Poems, Riverside Edition, 1891. 

Rudolph the Headsman 

Parnassus, R. W. Emerson, editor, 1875. 
Taken from the poem in the "Autocrat" beginning: "A pro- 
logue? Well, of course the ladies know." See ["Prologue"]. 

* Runaway Ballads I and II 

The CoUegian, Feb., 1830, no. 1, pp. 11-12. 

As these are the earliest in date of those poems of Dr. Holmes 
which it has been found possible to trace (except the transla- 
tion from the ^neid, "First Verses"), they are here given at 
length. 

I 

Wake from thy slumbers, Isabel, the stars are in the sky, 
And night has hung her silver lamp, to light our altar by; 
The flowers have closed their fading leaves, and droop upon 

the plain, 
O wake thee, and their dying hues shall blush to life again. 

In such a sacred hour as this, how beams the eye of love. 
When all is mellowed shade below, and all is light above; 
And oh, how soft a maiden's sigh melts on the midnight air. 
When scarce a wanton zephyr breathes, to wave her silken hair. 

The rattle of the soldier's steel has left the silent hall, 
The mastiff slumbers at the gate, the sentry on the wall; 
And there, by many a stately barge, that rocks upon the tide, 
A bark is floating on the waves and dancing by their side. 



[67] 

And when before the flowing wind she spreads her eagle wings, 
And like a halcyon, from her breast the shivered billow flings; 
Though many a prouder pendant flies before the ocean breeze. 
No keel can track her foaming path, that sweeps the sparkHng 

seas. 
Then come to me, my lovely one, and haste we far away. 
And we will reach the distant isle before the break of day; 
Let not thy gentle eyes grow dim, thy rosy cheek grow pale, 
For thou shalt find a beating heart beneath a warrior's mail. 

II 

Get up! get up! Miss Polly Jones, the tandem's at the door; 
Get up, and shake your lovely bones, it's twelve o'clock and 

more. 
The chaises they have rattled by, and nothing stirs around, 
And all the world, but you and I, are moving safe and sound. 

I broke a drunken watchman's nap, and he began to mutter, 
I gave him just a gentle tap, that helped him to the gutter; 
The cur-dog growled an ugly growl, and grinned a bitter grin; 
I tipped the beast a rat's-bane pill, to keep his music in. 

When Squaretoes stumps about the house, and does n't find 

you there. 
And all the folks are in a touse, my eyes ! how dad will stare ! 
He locked and double-locked the door, and saw you safe abed, 
And never dreamed a jailor's paw could scratch a booby's head. 

Come hurry! hurry! Polly Jones, it is no time to snooze; 
Don't stop for t'other petticoat, nor fidget for your shoes; 
I have a quilted wrapper here, your tender limbs to fold. 
It's growing mighty chilly, dear, and I shall catch a cold. 

I've got my gouty uncle's bay, and trotting Peggy too, 

I 've lined their tripes with oats and hay, and now for love and 

you; 
The lash is curling in the air, and I am at your side, 
To-morrow you are Mrs. Snaggs, my bold and blooming bride. 

R[ussell], J[ames] D[utton] (Read at the Class Meeting, 
Jan. 23, 1862) 
Songs and Poems of the Class of 1829, 1868, p. 63. 
Poems, Household Edition, 1877. 
In the former, under the title "In Memory of J. D. R." 



[68] 

Sabbath in Boston, A 

The Rosary of Illustrations of the Bible, 1848. 
A passage from "Urania: a Rhymed Lesson." 

Saint Anthony the Reformer — His Temptation 

Atlantic Monthly, Aug., 1859, vol. 4, p. 243, in the "Pro- 
fessor." 
Professor at the Breakfast-Table, 1859, pp. 255-256. 
Songs in Many Keys, 1862. 

Sargent, Howard 

See "H. C. M., H. S., J. K. W." 

* Scenes from an Unpublished Play 

The Collegian, March, 1830, no. 2, pp. 61-62; April, no. 3, 
pp. 138-140; July, no. 6, pp. 265-268. 

* Sceptres and thrones the morning realms have tried 

See Appendix, p. 310, infra. 
ScHOOL-BoY, The 

The Iron Gate, and Other Poems, 1880. 

* Scintilla, A 

Addresses at the Inauguration of Jared Sparks, LL. D., as 
President of Harvard College, June 20, 1849, p. 11. 

The author's name is not suggested here, but a printed copy 
of the poem, preserved in the Harvard College Library, has 
written upon it the words, "Written by O. W. Holmes." 

THE TASK 

Twelve well-crammed Hnes, firm, juicy, marrowy, sweet. 
No bone or trimmings, nothing here but meat. 
With rhyme run through them like a golden skewer. 
Taste might approve and patience may endure. 

THE EXECUTION 

Long live old Harvard ! Lo, her rushing train 

Greets a new sign-board stretched across the plain; 

While the hell rings — (and that the bell shall do 

Till Charles shall drop his worn-out channel through,) — 

It gently hints to every cur that barks. 

Here comes the engine, — don't you see the Sparks ? 



[69] 

How changed the scene! The forest path is clear; 
That mighty engine finds no Indian here ! 
The world's great teachers quit their native Alps 
To fill the skulls once trembhng for their scalps, 
When the red neighbors of our ancient school 
Left their own vngwams others' wigs to cool ! 

Sea Dialogue, A 

The Boatswain's Whistle (published at the National Sailors' 

Fair), November 12, 1864, no. 4, p. 27. 
Poems, Household Edition, 1877. 

Secret of the Stars, The 

Songs in Many Keys, 1862, as one of the group Pictures 

from Occasional Poems; so in 
Poems, Household Edition, 1877. 
Poems, Riverside Edition, 1891. 
See "Each Heart has its own Secret." 

Semi-centennial Celebration of the New England Society 
in New York, Dec. 22, 1855 

Pamphlet of above title, 1856, pp. 83-84; preceded by re- 

marfis by Dr. Holmes, pp. 82-83. 
Songs in Many Keys, 1862. 
The New England Society Orations. Addresses, Sermons 

and Poems, etc., 1901, pp. 269-270. 

Sentiment, A 

"The pledge of Friendship! it is still divine." 
Poems, 1849. 

Sentiment, A (Written for the Eighth Anniversary of the 
American Medical Association) 

"A triple health to Friendship, Science, Art." 
Leaflet. 
Boston Medical and Surgical Journal, May 17, 1855, vol. 52, 

p. 305. 
Songs in Many Keys, 1862. 
In last-mentioned volume first printed vd\h title. 

Sentiment, A 

See "Extracts from a Medical Poem." 



[70] 



September Gale, The 
Poems. 1836. 



Shadows, The (Written for the Class Meeting, Jan. 8, 1880) 

The Iron Gate, and Other Poems, 1880. 
Additional Songs and Poems of the Class of 1829, 1881, pp. 
192-194. 

Shakespeare Tercentennial Celebration (April 23, 1864) 
Atlantic Monthly, June, 1864, vol. 13, pp. 762-763. 
Songs of Many Seasons, 1875. 

Sherman's in Savannah! a Half-Rhymed Impromptu 
(Written for Class Meeting, Jan., 1865) 
Songs and Poems of the Class of 1829, 1868, p. 83. 
Songs of Many Seasons, 1875. 

Ship of State, The (Woodstock, Conn., July 4, 1877) 

Poems, Household Edition, 1877. 

Read on the same occasion as "A Family Record." 

Silent Melody, The 

Atlantic Monthly, Sept., 1878, vol. 42, p. 335. 
The Iron Gate, and Other Poems, 1880. 

* Six Verses 

[Buckingham's] New England Magazine, July, 1833, vol. 5, 
p. 44. 

Smiling Listener, The (Written for the Class Meeting, 
Jan. 5, 1871) 
Songs of Many Seasons, 1875. 

The date, 1871, is given correctly in the Contents, but in the 
text it is given as 1872. 

Additional Songs and Poems of the Class of 1829, 1881, pp. 

137-140. 
In last-mentioned volume printed with no other title than 
"Lines." 

Smith, Rev. Samuel F., D. D. 

See "To the Reverend S. F. Smith, D.D." 
Song for the Centennial Celebration of Harvard College, A 

Poems, 1849, 2d issue. 



[71] 

"This song, which I had the temerity to sing myself (felix 
avdacia,Mx. Franklin Dexter had the goodness to call it), was 
sent in a little too late to be printed with the official account of 
the celebration. It was written at the suggestion of Dr. Jacob 
Bigelow, who thought the popular tune * The Poacher's Song ' 
would be a good model for a lively ballad or ditty." — Note of 
Dr. Holmes in Riverside Edition of Poems. 

Song for a Temperance Dinner to which Ladies were In- 
vited 
Poems, Household Edition, 1877. 

Originally printed as " Song, written for the Annual Dinner of 
the New York Mercantile Library Association," in Poems, 1846. 

Song of Other Days, A 
Poems, 1849. 

Sung by Dr. Holmes to the Class of 1829, at its meeting at 
Commencement, 1847. 

* Song of the Henpecked 

The Amateur, Oct. 1, 1830, no. 7, p. 116. 

Song of " Twenty-Nine," A (Written for the Annual Meet- 
ing, 1851) 

Broadside, pp. 4 (page 4 blank), dated Jan. 2, 1851. 

Songs of the Class of 1829, 1854. 

Poems, Household Edition, 1877. 

This was really the first of the long series of poems written 
by Dr. Holmes expressly for the meetings of the Class of 1829. 
It was written in response to a unanimous vote of the Class, 
passed at the meeting of 1850, and was sung in 1851 to the tune 
of "The Bay of Biscay, O !" See "Questions and Answers." 

* Song of Welcome 

Complimentary Banquet given by the City Council of Boston 
to Rear-Admiral Lessoffsky and the Officers of the Rus- 
sian Fleet, at the Revere House, June 8, 1864, p. 57. 

See Appendix, p. 310, infra. 

Sea-birds of Muscovy, rest in our waters. 

Fold your white wings by our rock-girded shore; 

While with glad voices its sons and its daughters 
Welcome the friends ye have wafted us o'er. 



[72] 

Sea-kings of Neva, our hearts throb your greeting! 

Deep as the anchors your frigates let fall; 
Down to the fount where our hfe-pulse is beating, 

Sink the kind accents you bear to us all. 

Fires of the North, in eternal communion, 

Blend your broad flashes with evening's bright star ! 

God bless the Empire that loves the great Union; 
Strength to her people ! Long life to the Czar ! 

Song, written for the Annual Dinner of the New York Mer- 
cantile Library Association [1842] 
Poems, London, 1846. 

See "Song for a Temperance Dinner to which Ladies were 
Invited." 

Song, written for the Dinner given to Charles Dickens by 
the Young Men of Boston [1842] 

Report of the Dinner given to Charles Dickens, in Boston, 
February 1st, 1842, p. 33. (Sung to the air " Gramachree. ") 

Poems, London, 1846. 

A copy of this poem, printed on a folio sheet, presumably for 
distribution at the dinner, was sold at Anderson's in Oct., 1902, 
for $8.25. 

Souvenir, A 

American Monthly Magazine, Nov., 1836, n. s. vol. 2, pp. 

498-499. 
Poems, 1836. 

Poems, Cambridge Edition, 1895. 
Not in Household or Riverside Edition. 

Spectre Pig, The 

The Collegian, May, 1830, no. 4, pp. 180-182. 
Poems, 1836. 

Spring 

Songs in Many Keys, 1862. 

"Spring," Hke "The Study," "The Bells," "Non-Resistance," 
"The Moral Bully," "The Mind's Diet." and "Our Limita- 
tions," was originally a part of the long poem, "Astrsea: the 
Balance of Illusions," delivered before the Yale Phi Beta 



[73] 

Kappa in 1850, and printed in that year in pamphlet form. 
These extracts were printed in Songs in Many Keys under the 
group heading. Pictures from Occasional Poems, which has 
been retained in the Household Edition, but was discarded in 
the Riverside Edition, 1891. 

Spring has Come — Intra Muros 

Atlantic Monthly, June, 1858, vol. 2, pp. 110-111, in the 

"Autocrat." 
Autocrat of the Breakfast-Table, 1858, pp. 228-230. 
Songs in Many Keys, 1862. 

Stability of Science, The 

See "Extracts from a Medical Poem." 

Stanzas 

"Strange! that one lightly whispered tone." 
The Collegian, July 30, no. 6, p. 268. 
The Harbinger, 1833, pp. 60-61. 
Poems, 1836. 

Star, The, and the Lily 

The Amateur, Oct. 1, 1830, no. 7, p. 105. 

Star, The, and the Water-Lily 
Poems, 1836. 

Originally appeared, under the title "The Star and the Lily," 
in the Amateur, as above. 

* Star-Spangled Banner, The. Additional verse 

Sheet music, 4to. Pubhshed by Ohver Ditson & Co. [c. 1861 ]. 
When our land is illum'd with Hberty's smile. 
If a foe from within strike a blow at her glory, 
Down, down, with the traitor that dares to defile 
The flag of her stars and the page of her story. 
By the miUions unchain'd who our birthright have gained, 
We will keep her bright blazon forever unstained. 
And the star-spangled banner in triumph shall wave 
While the land of the free is the home of the brave. 

This stanza was sung by "Our Sweet Singer" (Mr. Angier) 
at the Class Meeting of Jan. 8, 1863. 



[74] 

State Prison Melodies 

See "The Treadmill Song." 
Statesman's Secret, The 

Poems, Riverside Edition, 1891, in "Readings over the Tea- 
cups." 

Poems, Cambridge Edition, 1895. 

Originally printed, under the title "The Disappointed States- 
man," as one of the group Pictures from Occasional Poems, 
in Songs in Many Keys, 1862, and still so printed in Household 
Edition. See "Each Heart has its own Secret." 

Steamboat, The 

The Boston Book, 1841, pp. 25-27. 
Poems, London, 1846. 

Stethoscope Song, The 

Poems, 1849. 
Stratford-on-Avon, Dedication of the Fountain at 

See "Poem for the Dedication," etc. 
Study, The 

Songs in Many Keys, 1862. 

See note to "Spring." 

Sumner, Charles, Hymn at the Funeral Services of 

See "Hymn at the Funeral Services," etc. 
Sun and Shadow 

Atlantic Monthly, Dec, 1857, vol. l,p. 181, in the "Autocrat." 

Autocrat of the Breakfast-Table, 1858, pp. 45-46. 

In last-mentioned volume first printed with title. 

Songs in Many Keys, 1862. 

Sun-Day Hymn, A 

Atlantic Monthly, Dec, 1859, vol. 4, p. 766, in the "Professor." 
Professor at the Breakfast-Table, 1859, pp. 402-403. 
Songs in Many Keys, 1862. 

* Sunset Scene (The Athenaeum Gallery) 

The Amateur, July 3, 1830, no. 2, p. 24. 
Swain, W. W. 

See "The Last Look." 



[75] 

Sweet Little Man, The 

Songs in Many Keys, 1862. 

* Tail-Piece, The 

The Collegian, July, 1830, no. 6, pp. 289-290. 

This poem closed the sixth and last number of the Collegian. 
It is introduced by these words : " We subjoin the following 
poetical finale, written by our most valued correspondent at the 
request of the Club." 

Kind world, sweet world, on every earthly shore. 
From Boston's dome to China's porcelain tower, 

We bend om* knee in lowly guise once more. 
To ask a blessing on our parting hour. 

Our bud was nursed in Winter's tempest roar, 
The dews of spring fell on the opened flower; 

The stem is snapped, and blue-eyed Summer sees 

Our lilac leaflets scattered to the breeze. 

No more we float upon the tide of time, 
That fills the chalice of the star-girt moon; 

The sober essay and the sounding rhyme 
Are as the echoes of a ceasing tune; 

From neighboring village and from distant chme. 
From bare-walled study and from gay saloon. 

We softly sink to dark obHvion's shade. 

Unwept, unblest, unhonored, and unpaid. 

The vagrant printer may resume his quill, 
To scribble school-boy on the nameless tomb; 

The hard-eyed pedant call us, if he will, 

Precocious children, nursed to fruitless bloom; 

The sad subscriber eye his tardy bill. 

And knit his brows in unavailing gloom — 

The printer's satire and the pedant's frown, 

The debtor's sigh, we swallow boldly down. 

But thou, sweet maiden, as thy fingers turn 
The last poor leaf that claims thine idle glance. 

If there was aught to feel or aught to learn 
In ode or treatise, vision, dream, or trance, — 

If the cold dust of the neglected urn 

Has ever warmed thee, by some happy chance, 



[76] 

Should aunts look grim, or fathers shake, the head, 
Plead for the harmless ashes of the dead. 

Ethereal being, thou whose melting eye 

Looks down hke heaven where'er its glances fall, 

On noiseless slipper, gliding softly by. 
So sweetly drest, so proper, and so tall, 

The dew-fed offspring of the summer sky, 
Beau, critic, poet, soldier, each and all. 

From the dormeuse, where thy soft limbs recline. 

Sigh out a requiem o'er our broken shrine. 

The fire is out — the incense all has fled; 

And will thy gentle heart refuse to grieve ? 
Forget the horrors of the cap-crowned head. 

The fatal symbol on a student's sleeve, 
Think that a boy may grow if he is fed. 

And stroke us softly as we take our leave; 
Say we were clever, knowing, smart, or wise. 
But do say something, if you d — ^n our eyes. 

Ye who have shrunk not, dangerous though it seem, 
To lay your hands on yet unlaureled brows, 

If e'er we meet — and frown not if we deem 

Fame yet may smile on boyhood's burning vows - 

Bound in the garlands that we fondly dream 
May yet be gathered from Parnassian boughs; 

Yours be the praise, who led our doubtful way, 

Till harmless Hatred threw his brick away. 

Perchance we greet you, not as late we came, 
In meagre pamphlet, bound in flimsy fold. 

But from a page that bears a prouder name. 
With silken covers and with edge of gold; 

Look then in kindness on our higher claim 
And bid us welcome as ye did of old; 

So may your lives in pleasure glide along. 

Rich as our prose, and sweeter than oiu* song. 

Peace with you all — the summer sun will rise 
Not less resplendent that we are no more: 

The evening stars will gird the arching skies, 
The winds will murmur, and the waters roar — 



[77] 

Our faded way is lost to mortal eyes, 

Our wave has broken on the silent shore — 
One whisper rises from the weeping spray — 
Farewell, dear readers — and be sure to pay. 
Tartarus 

Atlantic Monthly, Sept., 1890, vol. 66, pp. 399-400, in " Over 

the Teacups." 
Over the Teacups, 1890, pp. 259-260. 
Poems, Riverside Edition, 1891. 

Terpsichore (Phi Beta Kappa, Harvard, Aug. 24, 1843) 

Graham's Magazine,^ Jan., 1844, vol. 24, pp. 10-11. 

Poems, London, 1846. 

See "An After-Dinner Poem." 

^ See Passages from the Correspondence and Other Papers of Rufus W. 
Griswold (Cambridge, 1898), p. 146, where the following letter to Mr. 
Griswold, editor of Graham's, relating to this poem, is printed: — 

Boston, Sept. 1st, 1843. 
My dear Sm: 

I read a Poem at the dinner table of the Phi Beta Kappa at Cambridge 
the other day which I should like to publish in Graham's Magazine, if the 
editors want it and are willing to pay for it. 

It consists at present of 166 lines in the heroic measure — but I should 
be inclined to make it about two hundred, or very nearly that, by certain 
additions. I believe that for me it was remarkably happy, but you may 
think it no great thing. At any rate it has more point in it than most of the 
things of the kind I have done lately. 

Two or three weeks ago Mr. Frost, on the part of Gode/s Lady's Book, 
made me some liberal offers for anything I would give him. I answered 
that I felt bound to offer them to you first, but without the least idea that 
I should so soon have anything to publish. I therefore mention it to you 
and end my proposals with these questions : 

1. Do you want such a poem? 

2. What will you give me for it ? 

3. Are you afraid of a hint at repudiation in it ? 

4. Can it be published in your Magazine word for word, letter for letter, 
comma for comma? 

5. Do you want to see it before you meddle with it ? 

This is a very straight-forward business letter, and does not require any 
answer unless you want the Poem. If so I shall hear from you. Believe me 
very truly 

Your Friend, 

O. W. Holmes. 
P. S. No tender feelings are concerned which might interfere with Edi- 
torial interests. 



[ 78 ] 

* " This evening hour, which grateful memory spares " 

Pamphlet, 16mo, pp. 8. 

Boston Medical and Surgical Journal, Oct. 11, 1894, vol. 131, 
pp. 377-379. 

A footnote in the Journal informs us that this poem, some 
lines of which are omitted, "was read at a medical supper- 
party about forty-eight years ago;" and on the first page of the 
pamphlet is the following note : " These verses were read at a 
medical supper-party about the year 1845." 

There is nothing to indicate when the pamphlet was printed. 
Copies have been sold at auction as follows: Libbie's, 1890, 
$12.00; Arnold Sale, 1901, $14.00; Drury Sale, 1906, $15.50. 
The Boston Medical Library Association owns a pamphlet copy 
of the poem ; also a manuscript copy, formerly owned by the 
late Dr. James R. Chadwick. 

* This shrine a precious gift enfolds 

Memoir of Dr. James Jackson, by Dr. James J. Putnam, 

1905, pp. 414-415. 
These verses accompanied the gift of a set of silver salt-cellars 
to Dr. Jackson on his eightieth birthday, Oct. 3, 1857. 

This shrine a precious gift enfolds; 

Look, when its Uds unclose. 
Not on the shining cross it holds. 

But on the love it shows. 

What though the silvered brow may seem 

Amid the youthful throng 
A Httle farther down the stream 

That bears us all along ; 

Those murmiu'ing waves are mute to-day. 

The stream forgets to run. 
The brown locks mingle with the gray. 

And all our hearts are one. 

Ah, could we bring earth's sweetest song 

And bear its brightest gold. 
The gift our grateful hearts would wrong, 

Our love were still untold. 



[79] 

* Thoughts in Dejection 

[Buckingham's] New England Magazine, Sept., 1831, vol. 1, 

p. 239. 
The Harbinger (1833), pp. 51-52. 

Thus Saith the Lord (1862) 

Songs of Many Seasons, 1875. 

To a Blank Sheet of Paper 

The Amateur, July 17, 1830, no. 3, pp. 39-40. 
Poems, 1836. 

To a Caged Lion 

The Collegian, April, 1830, no. 3, p. 103. 

* To a Lady with her Back to Me 

[Buckingham's] New England Magazine, Nov., 1831, vol. 1, 
p. 429; in the first "Autocrat of the Breakfast-Table," pt. i. 

I know thy face is fresh and bright. 

Thou angel-moulded girl; 
I caught one glimpse of purest white, 

I saw one auburn curl. 

O would the whispering ripples breathe 

The thoughts that vainly strive — 
She turns — she turns to look on me; 

Black! cross-eyed! seventy-five! 

To an EngUsh Friend 
Poems, London, 1852.^ 
Songs in Many Keys, 1862. 

To an Insect 

[Buckingham's] New England Magazine, Sept., 1831, vol. 1, 

p. 235. 
The Harbinger, 1833, pp. 53-55. 
The Boston Book, 1836, pp. 229-230. 
Poems, 1836. 

To Canaan. A Puritan War-Song (Aug. 12, 1862) 
Songs of Many Seasons, 1875. 

"This poem, published anonymously in the Boston Evening 
* Printed as a sort of dedication of this edition. 



[80] 

Transcript, was claimed by several persons, three, if I remember 
correctly, Vhose names I have or have had, but never thought 
it worth while to publish." — Note of Dr. Holmes in River- 
side Edition. 

To James Freeman Clarke (April 4, 1880) 

Seventieth Birthday of James Freeman Clarke. Memorial 
of the Celebration by the Church of the Disciples, Monday, 
April 5, 1880, pp. 11-12. 

The Iron Gate, and Other Poems, 1880. 

See "A Birthday Tribute." 

To Christian Gottfried Ehrenberg (For his Jubilaeum at 
Berlin, Nov. 5, 1868) 
Songs of Many Seasons, 1875. 

* To Fame 

[Buckingham's] New England Magazine, Nov., 1831, vol. 1, 
p. 430; in the first "Autocrat of the Breakfast-Table," pt. i. 

They say thou hast a hundred tongues; 

My wife has only one; 
If she had been equipped like thee, 

O, what should I have done! 

The Echo 
Nay, dearest stranger, do not shout; 
My wife has worn the echo out. 

* To J[ohn] M[urray] F[orbes]. On his Eightieth Birthday, 
Feb. 23, 1813-Feb. 23, 1893 

Letters and Recollections of John Murray Forbes (Sarah 
Forbes Hughes), 1899, vol. i, p. 35. 

"It was this most genial of poets who wrote the verses given 
below, for the Saturday that fell next after my father's eightieth 
birthday, when they dined together at the [Saturday] club." 

I know thee well. From olden time 
Thou hadst a weakness for a rhyme. 
And wilt with gracious smile excuse 
The languor of a laggard muse. 
Whose gait betrays in every line 
The weight of years outnumbering thine. 



i 



[81] 

And wlio will care for blame or praise, 
When love each syllable betrays ? 

The seven-barred gate has long been past, 
The eighth tall decade cleared at last; 
But when its topmost bar is crossed 
Think not that life its charm hath lost ; 
Ginger will still be hot in mouth, 
And winter winds blow sometimes south, 
And youth might almost long to take 
A slice of fourscore's frosted cake. 

Thrice welcome to the chosen band. 
Culled from the crowd by Nature's hand: 
No warmer heart for us shall beat. 
No freer hand in friendship meet. 
Long may he breathe our mortal air. 
For heaven has souls enough to spare. 
Lay at his feet the fairest flowers — 
Thank God he still is Earth's and ours. 

To R[utherford] B. H[ayes], Boston, June 26, 1877 
Poems, Household Edition, 1877. 

To Frederick Henry Hedge (At a Dinner given him on 
his Eightieth Birthday, Dec. 12, 1885. With a bronze 
Statuette of John of Bologna's Mercury, presented by 
a few friends) 
Atlantic Monthly, March, 1886, vol. 57, p. 374, in "Two 
* Occasional' Poems with an Introduction" ("The New 
Portfoho"). 
Before the Curfew, and Other Poems, 1888. 

To H. W. Longfellow (Before his departure for Europe, 
May 27, 1868) 
Songs of Many Seasons, 1875. 

To J[ames] R[ussell] L[owell] 

"This is your month, the month of 'perfect days.'" 
Atlantic Monthly, August, 1885, vol. 56, p. 263. 
Before the Curfew, and Other Poems, 1888. 
See "Two Anniversary After-Dinner Poems." 



[82] 

To James Russell Lowell (At the Dinner given in his honor 
at the Tavern Club, on his Seventieth Birthday, Feb. 
22, 1889) 

Atlantic Monthly, April, 1889, vol. 63, pp. 556-558. 
Poems, Cambridge Edition, 1895. 
Not in Riverside Edition. 

To my Companions 

The Collegian, April, 1830, no. 3, pp. 122-123. 

Poems, 1836. 

Poems, Cambridge Edition, 1895. 

Not in Household or Riverside Edition. 

* To my Neighbour, Who Sings and Plays on the Piano- 
forte 
The Amateur, April 23, 1831, no. 19, pp. 291-292. Signed 
O. W. H. 

To my Old Readers 

Poems, Riverside Edition, 1891, as Prelude to "Readings over 

the Teacups." 
Poems, Cambridge Edition, 1895. 

To my Readers 

Poems, Blue and Gold Edition, 1862. 

Originally appeared, under the title "The Poet to the Read- 
ers," in Atlantic Monthly, July, 1862, vol. 10, pp. 118-119. 

To George Peabody^ (Danvers, 1866) 
The Iron Gate, and Other Poems, 1880. 

To Governor Swain 

Songs in Many Keys, 1862. 

Printed mider the title " Answer to an Invitation," in Verses 
from the Island Book, 1865, where the first line has shijf 
instead of hark. 

"Governor "Swain (see "Island Hunting-Song,'* p. 40, 
supra) was an uncle of the wife of John M. Forbes, a later 
owner of Naushon island. The poem was written at Pittsfield 
in 1851, says Mr. Scudder. 

1 See Morse's Life and Letters of O. W. H., vol. ii, pp. 180-181. 



[ 83 ] 

To the Eleven Ladies who presented me with a Silver Lov- 
ing-Cup on the twenty-ninth of August, m dccc lxxxix 
Atlantic Monthly, Jan., 1890, vol. Q5y p. 121, in "Over the 

Teacups." 
Over the Teacups, 1890, pp. 43-44. 
Poems, Riverside Edition, 1891. 

* To the Lady Opposite 

The Amateur, March 12, 1831, no. 16, p. 244. 

To the Poets who only Read and Listen (At the Dinner of 
the $. B. K. Society, June 25, 1885) 

Atlantic Monthly, August, 1885, vol. 56, pp. 264-265. 

Poems, Riverside Edition, 1891. 

See "Two Anniversary After-Dinner Poems." 

To the Portrait of a Gentleman 
Poems, 1836. 

To the Portrait of a Lady 
Poems, 1836. 

* To the Reverend S. F. Smith, D. D., Author of "My 
Country, 't is of Thee," on his eightieth birthday, Oct. 
21, 1888 

Poems of Home and Country, Rev. Samuel Francis Smith, 
1895, p. ix. (With a letter from Dr. Holmes to Mrs. Smith.) 

While through the land the strains resound, 

What added fame can love impart 
To him who touched the string that found 

Its echoes in a nation's heart ? 

No stormy ode, no fiery march. 

His gentle memory shall prolong; 
But on fair Freedom's climbing arch, 

He shed the hght of hallowed song. 

Full many a poet's labored lines 

A country's creeping waves will hide; 

The verse a people's love enshrines 

Stands Uke the rock that breasts the tide. 



[84] 

Time wrecks the proudest piles we raise; 

The towers, the domes, the temples fall; 
The fortress ever crumbles and decays, — 

One breath of song outlasts them all. 

To the Teachers of America 

Poems, Cambridge Edition, 1895. 

Read at a dinner given by Mr. Houghton and other publishers, 
during a session in Boston of the National Educational Associa- 
tion, on February 23, 1893. 

To John Greenleaf Whittier (On his Eightieth Birthday, 
1887) 
Before the Curfew, and Other Poems, 1888. 
Toad-Stool, The 

The Collegian, Feb., 1830, no. 1, pp. 23-24. 
The Harbinger (1833), pp. 55-56. 
Poems, 1836. 

Toast to Wilkie Collins, A (Feb. 16, 1874) 

Songs of Many Seasons, 1875. 

Too Young for Love 

Atlantic Monthly, July, 1890, vol. 66, p. 105, in " Over the 

Teacups." 
Over the Teacups, 1890, p. 202. , 

Poems, Riverside Edition, 1891. 

Treadmill Song, The (State Prison Melodies) 
The Amateur, Aug. 7, 1830, no. 4, p. 59. 
The Gleaner, or Selections in Prose and Poetry from the 

Periodical Press, 1830, pp. 125-126. 
Poems, 1836, where the broader title is dropped, not to appear 

again. 

* Triumph of Song, The 

Atlantic Monthly, Sept., 1867, vol. 20, pp. 264-265, in "The 

Guardian Angel." 
The Guardian Angel, 1867, pp. 302-303. 

* Trumpet Song 

Lyrics of Loyalty, 1864, pp. 150-152. 



[85] 

This poem, which is quite unlike any other of its author's 
productions, has a refrain after each stanza: — 

Ta ra! ta ta ta! 
Beat drums and blow trumpets! 
Trum, trum, tra ra ra ra! 

Hurrah, boys, hurrah! 

Two Anniversary After-Dinner Poems. I. Harvard Com- 
mencement, June 24, 1885, to J[ames] R[usseU] L[owell]. 
II. At the Dinner of the ^. B. K. Society, June 25, 1885; 
to the Poets who only Listen 
Atlantic Monthly, Aug., 1885, vol. 56, pp. 263-265. 

Two Armies, The 

Atlantic Monthly, July, 1858, vol. 2, p. 245, in the " Autocrat." 
Autocrat of the Breakfast-Table, 1858, pp. 262-264. 
Border Lines of Knowledge, etc., 1862, pp. 79-80. 
Songs in Many Keys, 1862. 

Two Poems to Harriet Beecher Stowe on her Seventieth 
Birthday (June 14, 1882) 
See "At the Summit" and "The World's Homage." 

* Two Shadows, The 

The Amateur, Aug. 7, 1830, no. 4, p. 59. 
The Gleaner, 1830, pp. 133-134. 
The Harbinger, 1833, pp. 49-51. 

Two Streams, The 

Atlantic Monthly, June, 1859, vol. 3, p. 770, in the "Pro- 
fessor." 
Professor at the Breakfast-Table, 1859, pp. 192-193. 
Songs in Many Keys, 1862. 

Ugly Reflections 

[Buckingham's] New England Magazine, July, 1832, vol. 3, 

p. 21. 
See "Daily Trials, by a Sensitive Man." 
Under the Violets 

Atlantic Monthly, Oct., 1859, vol. 2, p. 511 , in the " Professor. " 
Professor at the Breakfast-Table, 1859, pp. 319-320. 
Songs in Many Keys, 1862. 



[86] 

Little Classics, Rossiter Johnson, editor, 1875, vol. vii, pp. 
58-59. 

Under the Washington Ehn (April 27, 1861) 
Chimes of Freedom and Union, 1861, p. 5. 
Songs in Many Keys, 1862. 

Union and Liberty 

Atlantic Monthly, Dec, 1861, vol. 8, pp. 756-757. 
Songs in Many Keys, 1862. 

Printed on the programme for Commemoration Day at 
Harvard College, July 21, 1865. 

Unsatisfied 

Boston Daily Advertiser, May 10, 1876 (unsigned). 

Poems, Household Edition, 1877. 

At the Donaldson Sale, in 1899, an autograph letter of Dr. 
Holmes to the editors of the Advertiser, dated May 8, 1876, 
together with the original ms. of this poem, which he inclosed 
in the letter, requesting that it be printed anonymously, was 
sold for $16.00. 

Upham, Charles Wentworth, Jr., In Memory of 
See "In Memory of," etc. 

Urania, a Rhymed Lesson, Delivered before the Boston 
Mercantile Library Association, Oct. 14, 1846 

Poems, 1849, pp. 207-240. 

In the later collections, printed under the title, " A Rhymed 
Lesson," simply. For notes concerning the pubhcation of 
extracts from "Urania," see "Boston Church Bells" and "A 
Sabbath in Boston." 

Verses for After-Dinner (Phi Beta Kappa, 1844) 
Poems, 1849. 
See "Lines recited at the Cambridge Phi Beta Kappa Dinner." 

Vestigia Quinque Retrorsum. An Academic Poem (Read 
at the Commencement Dinner of the Alumni of Harvard 
University, June 25, 1879, by one of the Class of 1829) 

Atlantic Monthly, August, 1879, vol. 44, pp. 238-241. 

The Iron Gate, and Other Poems, 1880. 



[87] 

Additional Songs and Poems of the Class of 1829, 1881, pp. 
186-192. 

"Although not written for a class-meeting [it] cannot be 
omitted from a collection of poems of the Class of 1829." 

Vignettes 

Songs in Many Keys, 1862. 
Under this group heading are included: 
After a Lecture on Wordsworth. 
After a Lecture on Moore. 
After a Lecture on Keats. 
, After a Lecture on Shelley. 
At the Close of a Course of Lectures. 
The Hudson. After a Lecture at Albany. 
The heading is retained in the Household Edition, but does 
not appear in the Riverside, Cambridge, or Cabinet Edition. 

Vision, The 

The Poet among the Hills (J. E. A. Smith), 1895, pp. 101- 

105. 
See "After a Lecture on Wordsworth" and "A Vision of the 
Housatonic." 

* Vision of Life, A (Read at the graduating exercises of 
the Pittsfield Young Ladies' Institute in 1849) 
The Poet among the Hills (J. E. A. Smith), 1895, pp. 111- 

113. 
Dr. Holmes made a short speech (given on pp. 110 and 111), 
after which he said: 

"I will read you a few lines from a scrap of paper which, as 
you see, I have kept artfully concealed about my person." 

A VISION OF LIFE 

The well-known weakness of the rhyming race 
Is to be ready in and out of place; 
No bashful glow, no timid begging off, 
No sudden hoarseness, no discordant cough 
(Those coy excuses which your singers plead, 
When faintly uttering: "No, I can't, indeed") 
Impedes your rhymster in his prompt career. 
Give him but hint; and won't the muse appear? 



[88] 

So, without blushing, when they asked, I came — 

I whom the plough-share, not the quill, should claim 

The riu-al nymphs that on my labors smile 

May mend my fence, but cannot inend my style. 

The winged horse disdains my steady team. 

And teeming fancy must forget to dream. 

I harrow fields and not the hearts of men; 

Pigs, and not poems, claim my humble pen. 

And then to enter on so new a stage. 

With the fair critics of this captious age, 

Might lead a sceptic to the rude surmise 

That cits, turned rustics, are not overwise; 

Or the bright verdure of the pastoral scene 

Had changed my hue, and made me very green. 

A few brief words that, fading as they fall. 

Like the green garlands of a festal hall. 

May lend one glow, one breath of fragrance pour. 

Ere swept ungathered from the silent floor. 

Such is my offering for your festal day: 

These sprigs of rhyme; this metrical bouquet. 

O my sweet sisters — let me steal the name 
Nearest to love and most remote from blame — 
How brief an hour of fellowship ensures 
The heart *s best homage at a shrine like yours. 
As o*er your band our kindling glances fall. 
It seems a life-time since I Ve known you all! 
Yet on each face, where youthful graces blend, 
Our partial memory still revives a friend; 
The forms once loved, the features once adored, 
In her new picture nature has restored. 

Those golden ringlets, rippling as they flow. 
We wreathed with blossoms many years ago. 
Seasons have wasted; but, remembered yet, 
There gleams the lily through those braids of jet. 
Cheeks that have faded, worn by slow decay. 
Have caught new blushes from the morning's ray. 
That simple ribbon, crossed upon the breast, 
Wakes a poor heart that sobbed itself to rest; 
Aye, thus she wore it; tell me not she died, 
With that fair phantom floating by my side. 



[89] 

'T is as of old: why ask the vision's namg ? 
All, to the white robe's folding, is the same; 
And there, unconscious of a hundred snows. 
On that white bosom burns the self-same rose. 

Oh, dear illusion, how thy magic power 

Works with two charms — a maiden and a flower! 

Then blame me not if, lost in memory's dream, 

I cheat your hopes of some expansive theme. 

When the pale starlight fills the evening dim, 

A misty mantle folds our river's brim. 

In those white wreaths, how oft the wanderer sees 

Half real shapes, the playthings of the breeze. 

While every image in the darkening tide 

Fades from its breast, unformed and undescried. 

Thus, while I stand among your starry train, 

My gathering fancies turn to mist again. 

O'er time's dark wave aerial shadows play, 

But all the Hving landscape melts away. 

Vision of the Housatonic, A. Epilogue to a Lecture on 
Wordsworth 
Knickerbocker Gallery (1855), pp. 23-26, with portrait. 
See "After a Lecture on Wordsworth" and "The Vision." 

Vive la France! 

The Address of Mr. Everett and the Poem of Dr. Holmes at 
the Dinner given to H. H. Monseigneur the Prince 
Napoleon, Sept. 25, 1861, pp. 19-20. 

Songs in Many Keys, 1862. 

Voice of the Loyal North, A. National Fast, Jan. 4, 1861 
(Written for the Class Meeting, Jan. 3, 1861) 
Chimes of Freedom and Union, 1861, p. 44. 
Songs in Many Keys, 1862. 
Songs and Poems of the Class of 1829, 1868, pp. 59-61. 

Voiceless, The 

Atlantic Monthly, Oct., 1858, vol. 2, p. 630, in the " Autocrat." 
Autocrat of the Breakfast-Table (1858), pp. 355-356. 
Songs in Many Keys, 1862. 
Little Classics, Rossiter Johnson, editor, 1875, vol.xv, p. 229. 



[90] 

"The Voiceless" is probably the "serious poem" to which 
Longfellow refers in his Journal as having been read by Holmes 
at a dinner of the Harvard Musical Association, Jan. 18, 1858. 

Voyage of the Good Ship Union (Read at the Class Meet- 
ing, Jan., 1862) 
Atlantic Monthly, March, 1862, vol. 9, pp. 398-400. 
Poems, Blue and Gold Edition, 1862. 
Songs and Poems of the Class of 1829, 1868, pp. 64-67. 
The original ms. of this poem, 6 pp., small 4to, is in the 
Harvard College Library. 

Waite, Josiah Kendall 

See "H. C. M., H. S., J. K. W." 

Ware, John and Robert, In Memory of 

See "In Memory of J. W. R. W." 
Warren, Joseph, M. D. 

Boston Medical and Surgical Journal, June 17, 1875, vol. 92, 
p. 703. 

Proceedings of the Bunker Hill Monument Association at 
the Annual Meeting, June 23, 1875, with the Oration of 
Hon. Charles Devens, Jr., and an account of the Centen- 
nial Celebration, June 17, 1875, p. 154. 

Poems, Household Edition, 1877. 

Wasp, The, and the Hornet 

The Token and Atlantic Souvenir, 1833, p. 309. 
The Boston Book, 1836, p. 118. 
Poems, 1836. 

* " We owe, alas ! to woman's sin " 

Life and Letters of Oliver Wendell Holmes (Morse), 1896, 
vol. i, p. 202. 

"In 1870 Miss Harriet Putnam (now Mrs. H. J. Hayden, of 
New York) sent him an apple 'stolen* from a tree which over- 
hung the road in front of his old house, and he replied thus: *' 

We owe, alas! to woman's sin 

The woes with which we grapple ; — 

To think that all our plagues came in 
For one poor stolen apple! 



[91] 

And still we love the darling thief 

Whose rosy fingers stole it; — 
Her weakness brought the world to grief, 

Her smiles alone console it ! 
— I take the " stolen" fruit you leave, — 

(Forgive me, Maid and Madam,) 
It makes me dream that you are Eve, 

And wish that I were Adam ! 

Webster, Daniel, Birthday of 

See "Birthday of Daniel Webster." 
Welcome to Chicago Commercial Club (Jan. 14, 1880) 

The Iron Gate, and Other Poems, 1880. 

Welcome to Dr. Benjamin Apthorp Gould, A (On his 
Return from South America, after fifteen years devoted 
to cataloguing the stars of the Southern Hemisphere) 
Addresses at the CompHmentary Dinner to Dr. Benjamin 

Apthorp Gould, May 6, 1885, pp. 22-24. 
Before the Curfew, and Other Poems, 1888. 

Welcome to the Grand Duke Alexis. Music Hall, Dec. 9, 
1871 (Sung to the Russian National Air by the Chil- 
dren of the Public Schools) 
Programme of Exercises at the Musical Entertainment in 
Honor of his Imperial Highness the Grand Duke Alexis; 
4-page folder. 
Songs of Many Seasons, 1875. 

Mentioned, but not printed, in His Imperial Highness the 
Grand Duke Alexis in the United States, etc. (see page 8, supra). 
The date is given correctly in all collected editions of the poems 
prior to the Riverside, 1891, in which, and in the Cambridge and 
Cabinet Editions, it is printed December 6th. 

Welcome to the Nations (Philadelphia, July 4, 1876) 

The Centennial Liberty Bell, by Jos. S. Longshore, M. D., 

and Benjamin L. Knowles, Esq., 1876, p. 61. 
His Royal Highness Prince Oscar [of Sweden] at the National 
Celebration of the Centennial Anniversary of American 
Independence, 1876, pp. 65-66. 
Poems, Household Edition, 1877. 



[92] 

What I Have Come For (Written for the Class Meeting, 
Jan. 9, 1873) 
Songs of Many Seasons, 1875. 

Additional Songs and Poems of the Class of 1829, 1868, pp. 
155-156. 

What we all Think 

Atlantic Monthly, April, 1858, vol. 1, pp. 743-744, in the 

" Autocrat." 
Autocrat of the Breakfast-Table, 1858, pp. 168-170. 
Songs in Many Keys, 1862. 

Whittier, John Greenleaf 

See "In Memory of John Greenleaf Whittier" and "To John 
Greenleaf Whittier." 

* "Who that can pluck the flower will choose the weed" 

Life and Letters of Oliver Wendell Hohnes (Morse), 1896, 
vol. i, p. 232. 

"A gentleman, famous for a generation as 'Tom Apple - 
ton,' ... in a lottery at a fair drew an album, of which the 
alternate sheets bore prettily painted flowers and foliage. He 
passed it about to Longfellow, Emerson, Holmes, and the rest, 
asking each to select his page and write something upon it. . . . 
Holmes took a page bearing a cluster of wild autumnal leaves, 
and wrote: — 

" Who that can pluck the flower will choose the weed. 
Leave the sweet rose and gather blooms less fair ? 
And who my homely verse will stay to read. 
Straying enchanted through this bright parterre, 
When morning's herald lifts his purple bell 
And spring's young violet wooes the wanderer's eye ? 
Nay ! let me seek the fallen leaves that tell 
Of beggared winter's footstep drawing nigh; 
There shall my shred of song enshrouded He, 
A leaf that dropped in memory's flowery dell; 
The breath of friendship stirred it, and it fell. 
Tinged with the loving liue of Autumn's fond farewell. 

"Boston, February 22, 1874." 



[93] 

Wind-Clouds and Star-Drifts, I-VII 

Atlantic Monthly, May-Nov., 1872, vol. 29, pp. 617-618, 742; 

vol. 30, pp. 107-110, 237-239, 362-363, 436-437, 522-523, 

in the " Poet." 
The Poet at the Breakfast-Table, 1872, pp. 169-171, 201-203, 

230-236, 270-274, 302-306, 334-338, 364-367. 
Poems, Household Edition, 1877. 

Wonderful One-Hoss Shay, The 
See "The Deacon's Masterpiece." 

Woodlawn Cemetery 

Memory and Hope, Marian CD. Silsbee, editor, 1851. 
See " Poem for the Dedication of the Pittsfield Cemetery." 

Word of Promise, The (By supposition). An Hymn set 
forth to be sung by the Great Assembly at Newtown, 
Mo. 12. 1. 1636 
Services a,t the Celebration of the Two Hundred and Fiftieth 
Anniversary of the Organization of the First Church in 
Cambridge, February 7-14, 1886, p. 22; preceded by 
remarks by Dr. Holmes, pp. 20-21. 
Poems, Riverside Edition, 1891. 

World's Homage, The. To Harriet Beecher Stowe on her 
Seventieth Birthday (June 14, 1882) 
Before the Curfew, and Other Poems, 1888. 

* " Yes, home is sweet! and yet we needs must sigh" (Read 
by Prof. H. P. Bowditch at the annual dinner of the Har- 
vard Club of New York, Feb. 21, 1882) 

Boston Medical and Surgical Journal, Feb. 23, 1882, vol. 106, 
p. 187; also Dec. 13, 1894 vol. 131, p. 586. 

The sonnet was printed on slips for distribution at the din- 
ner. 

The second reference is to the account of the Holmes Memo- 
rial meeting of the Boston Medical Library Association, at 
which Dr. Bowditch again read the sonnet, having first told 
the circumstances under which it was written; he spoke of 
it as having never before been printed. It there has the title 
"Ahna Mater. " 



[94] 

Yes, home is sweet! and yet we needs must sigh, 
Restless until our longing souls have foimd 
Some realm beyond the fireside's narrow bound 

Where slippered ease and sleepy comfort lie, — 

Some fair ideal form that cannot die 

By age dismantled and by change uncrowned. 
Else life creeps circUng in the self -same round, 

And the low ceiling hides the lofty sky. 

Ah, then to thee our truant hearts return, 
Dear Mother, Alma^ Casta — spotless, kind! 
Thy sacred walls a larger home we find. 

And still for thee thy wandering children yearn, 

While with imdying fires thine altars burn 
Where all our hoHest memories rest enshrined. 

Youth (Written for the Thirty-First Anniversary of the 
Boston Young Men's Christian Union, May 31, 1882) 

Poems, Cambridge Edition, 1895. 

Not in Riverside Edition. The Boston Daily Advertiser of 
June 1, 1882, has an account of this anniversary celebration, 
with the poem in full, as well as the witty Httle speech with 
which Dr. Holmes prefaced it. 

A copy of the poem, in Dr. Holmes's autograph, brought 
$16.00 at Henkels's in 1898. 



[95] 

II 
PROSE 

* Address at the Annual Meeting of the Boston 

Microscopical Society 

Boston Medical and Surgical Journal, May 24, 1877, vol. 96, 
pp. 601-602. 

* Address at the Inauguration of Cornelius C. Felton, LL. D., 

as President of Harvard College, July 19, 1860 
Addresses at the Inauguration, etc., 1860 (pamphlet, 8vo), 
pp. 121-124, 132. 

Dr. Holmes presided at the dinner after the inauguration, the 
account of which, with his speeches introducing the different 
speakers, is printed on pp. 121-149 of the pamphlet. 

* Address before the Medical Library Association (Delivered 

at the formal presentation of Dr. Holmes's medical 
library, Jan. 29, 1889) 

Boston Medical and Surgical Journal, Feb.- 7, 1889, vol. 120, 
pp. 129-130. 

* Address at the One Hundredth Anniversary of the Founda- 

tion of the Medical School of Harvard University, Oct. 17, 
1883 

The New Century and the New Building of the Harvard 
Medical School, 1884 (pamphlet, 8vo, illus.), pp. 3-35. 

* After-Breakfast Talk, An 

Atlantic Monthly, Jan., 1883, vol. 51, pp. 65-75. 

* After Our Hundred Days 

Atlantic Monthly, Jan., 1888, vol. 61, pp. 127-130. 

* Agassiz*s Natural History [Review] 

Atlantic Monthly, Jan., 1858, vol. 1, pp. 320-333. 

* Americanized European, The 

Atlantic Monthly, Jan., 1875, vol. 35, pp. 75-86. 



[96] 

* Amory, William, Memoir of 

Proceedings of the Massachusetts Historical Society, June 13, 

1889, 2d series, vol. 4, pp. 414-417. 
See also p. 215 of the same volume. 

* Andre, Major John, Life of [RevieT\r] 

Atlantic Monthly, July, 1871, vol. 28, pp. 121-122. 

* Appleton, Thomas Gold 

Atlantic Monthly, June, 1884, vol. 53, pp. 848-850. 

* Autocrat of the Breakfast-Table, The [No. I] 

[Buckingham's] New England Magazine, Nov., 1831, and 
Feb., 1832, vol. 1, pp. 428-431, vol. 2, pp. 134-138. 

These papers have been reprinted, but not in any author- 
ized edition of Dr. Holmes's works, and are known to-day only 
as explaining the mysterious opening sentence of the real 
" Autocrat." They may be iound in the Cornhill Booklet of 
Feb., 1901. 

Autocrat of the Breakfast-Table, The 

Atlantic Monthly, Nov., 1857, to Oct., 1858, vol. l,pp. 48-57, 

175-184, 312-320, 457-469, 614-625, 734-744, 871-883; 

vol. 2, pp. 102-111, 234-245, 360-370, 496-506, 619-633. 
As the poems scattered through the *' Autocrat " have not been 
printed in any of the collected editions in the order in which they 
appear in that work, a list of them in that order is here given. 
Those which were printed in the Atlantic without titles are 
placed between brackets. 

[Album Verses.] 

Latter Day Warnings. 

[A Parting Health — to J. L. Motley.] ^ 

Spring has Come — Intra Muros. 

A Good Time Going. 

The Two Armies. 

Musa. 

The Deacon's Masterpiece. 

-Estivation. 

Contentment. 

[Prelude.] 

* This poem was fir^ printed in the " Autocrat " when it appeared in 
book form. 



[ 97 ] 

Parson Turell's Legacy. 

The Voiceless. 

[Sun and Shadow.] 

[Prologue.] 

[Ode for a Social Meeting.] 

The Old Man Dreams. 

The Chambered Nautilus. 

Mare Rubrum. 

What we All Think. 

The Last Blossom. 

The Living Temple. 

* Autocrat, The, Gives a Breakfast to the Public 

Atlantic Monthly, Dec, 1858, vol. 2, pp. 889-894. 
Contains the poem "Avis." The original ms. of the article, 
14 pp., 4to, brought $145.00 at the Williamson Sale, 1904. 

* Bartlett, The Late Dr. Elisha 

Boston Medical and Surgical Journal, Aug. 14, 1865, vol. 53, 
pp. 49-52. 

* Beecher, Henry Ward, Tribute to 

The Beecher Memorial, Edward W. Bok, editor, 1887, 
pp. 1-3. 

* BiGELow, Henry J., M. D., Memoir of 

Proceedings of American Academy of Arts and Sciences, 
May 26, 1891, vol. 26, pp. 339-351. 

* Bigelow, Dr. Jacob, Memoir of 

Proceedings of American Academy of Arts and Sciences, 
May 27, 1879, vol. 14, pp. 333-342. 

* Bigelow, Dr. Jacob, Remarks on 

Proceedings of the Massachusetts Historical Society, Feb. 13, 
1879, vol. 17, pp. 40-44. 

Border Lines of Knowledge in Some Provinces of 
Medical Science 

[Abstract in] Boston Medical and Surgical Journal, Nov. 14, 
1861, vol. 65, pp. 318-319, under the title "Dr. Holmes's 
Introductory Lecture." 

Medical Essays, 1883. 



[98] 

Bread and the Newspaper 

Atlantic Monthly, Sept., 1861, vol. 8, pp. 346-352. 
Soundings from the Atlantic, 1864, pp. 1-23. 
Pages from an Old Volume of Life, 1883. 

* Brewer, Gardner, Tribute to 

In Memoriam. Died at Newport, Sept. 30, 1874, Gardner 
Brewer, pp. 8-12. 

* Brief Expositions of Rational Medicine [Review] 

Atlantic Monthly, Nov., 1858, vol. 2, pp. 763-764. 

Cinders from the Ashes 

' Atlantic Monthly, Jan., 1869, vol. 23, pp. 115-123. 
Pages from an Old Volume of Life, 1883. 

* Claims of Dentistry, The 

Boston Medical and Surgical Journal, Feb. 29, 1872, n. s. 
vol. 9, pp. 134-141. 

* Clarke, Edward Hammond, Memorial Sketch of 

Visions: A Study of False Sight, by Edward H. Clarke, M.D., 

1878, pp. xiii-xxii. 
The same volume contains, on pp. vii-xiii, an introduction by 
Dr. Holmes. 

* Clarke, James Freeman, Remarks on 

Proceedings of the Massachusetts Historical Society, June 14, 
1888, 2d series, vol. 4, pp. f44-147. 

Contagiousness of Puerperal Fever, The 

New England Quarterly Journal of Medicine and Surgery, 

April, 1843, vol. 1, pp. 503-530. 
Medical Essays, 1883. 

See also "Puerperal Fever as a Private Pestilence." 
Crime and Automatism 

Atlantic Monthly, April, 1875, vol. 35, pp. 466-481. 
Pages from an Old Volume of Life, 1883. 

* Cry from the Study, A 

Atlantic Monthly, Jan., 1886, vol. 57, pp. 91-98. 
See "The New Portfolio," II. 



[99] 

Currents and Counter-Currents in Medical Science 

Medical Communications of the Massachusetts Medical 

Society, 1860, pp. 305-348. On pp. 345-348, under the 

heading "Notes," are certain passages omitted in delivery.^ 

Currents and Counter-Currents in Medical Science, with 

Other Addresses and Essays, 1861, pp. 1-50. 
Medical Essays, 1883, pp. 173-208. 

* Dana, Richard H., Jr., Remarks on 

Proceedings of the Massachusetts Historical Society, Jan. 12, 
1882, vol. 19, pp. 197-199. 

* Dante, Remarks on (600th Anniversary of his birth) 

Proceedings of the Massachusetts Historical Society, May 11, 
1865, vol. 8, pp. 277-278. 

* Davis, George T., Remarks on 

Proceedings of the Massachusetts Historical Society, Oct. 11, 
1877, vol. 15, pp. 310-311. 

* Debut, The 

[Buckingham's] New England Magazine, March, 1832, vol. 2, 

pp. 225-229. Signed O. W. H. 
Contains the poem, "I cannot say if truth there be.'* 

Dedicatory Address at the Opening of the New 
Building and Hall of the Boston Medical Li- 
brary Association (Read December 3, 1878) 

Boston Medical and Surgical Journal, Dec. 12, 1878, vol. 99, 

pp. 745-758. 
See "Medical Libraries." 

^ In the Boston Medical and Surgical Journal, June 7, 1860, is the fol- 
lowing note: — 

"As the Address delivered by Dr. Holmes last week has been variously 
and erroneously reported in some of the public papers, the attention of our 
readers is directed to the following note on the subject from Dr. Holmes: 

"Messrs. Editors, — I beg leave to say that I prepared an abstract of 
my address before the Massachusetts Medical Society for the Boston 
Journal, and disclaim all responsibility for opinions attributed to me in 
any other report of the Address. 

"Yours, very truly, 

"O. W. Holmes. 

"June 4th. 1860." 



[ 100 ] 

* Dental Cosmos, The. A Monthly Record of Dental Science 

[Review] 

Boston Medical and Surgical Journal, March 11, 1869, n. s. 
vol. 3, pp. 99-102. 

* Dr. Asa Gray's Botanical Series [Review] 

Atlantic Monthly, Aug., 1858, vol. 2, pp. 383-384. 

* Dr. Holmes at the Festival. " A reply to the charges which 
various evangelical papers have brought against a recent 
article of his in the Atlantic Monthly, that it is poisoning 
public opinion " 

Quarterly Journal of the American Unitarian Association, 
July, 1859, vol. 6, pp. 355-362. 

The " article " referred to is not named, but the animadver- 
sions of the evangelical press were called forth by certain pass- 
ages in the '* Professor at the Breakfast-Table," notably in the 
installment which had recently appeared in the May number 
of the Atlantic Monthly. 

* Doings of the Sunbeam 

Atlantic Monthly, July, 1863, vol. 12, pp.^-15. 
Soundings from the Atlantic, 1864, pp. 228-281. 

Edwards, Jonathan 

International Review, July, 1880, pp. 1-28. 

Sketches and Reminiscences of the Radical Club of Chestnut 

St., Boston, 1880, pp. 362-375. 
Pages from an Old Volume of Life, 1883. 

* Elliotson*s Principles and Practice of Medicine [Review] 

Boston Medical and Surgical Journal, Dec. 13, 1843, vol. 29, 
pp. 369-376. 

Elsie Venner. Episode de la Vie Americaine. Par E.-D. 
Forgues 

Revue des Deux Mondes, 15 Juin and 1 Juillet, 1861, tomes 

33, pp. 930-963, and 34, pp. 67-100. 
In this translation the story is very much abridged. It was 
published in book form in the same year. See infray p. 178. 



[ 101 ] 

* Emerson, Ralph Waldo, Tribute to 

Proceedings of the Massachusetts Historical Society, May 11, 

1882, vol. 19, pp. 303-310. 
Tributes to Longfellow and Emerson, 1882, pp. 39-50. 

* Exotics [Review] 

Atlantic Monthly, Sept., 1875, vol. 35, pp. 356-360. 

* Facts and Traditions respecting the Existence of Indige- 
nous Intermittent Fever in New England 

Boylston Prize Dissertations for the Years 1836 and 1837 
(1838), pp. 1-132. 

Farewell Address to the Medical School of Harvard 
University 

Boston Medical and Surgical Journal, Dec. 7, 1882, vol. 107, 

pp. 529-534. 
On page 546 are two letters from Dr. Holmes, dated Dec. 1 
and 2, acknowledging gifts from his pupils. 
See "Some of my Early Teachers." 

* Great Instrument, The (A History of the Music Hall 
Organ) 

Atlantic Monthly, Nov., 1863, vol. 12, pp. 637-647. 
Soundings from the Atlantic, 1864, pp. 362-400. 

Guardian Angel, The 

Atlantic Monthly, Jan. to Dec, 1867, vol. 19, pp. 1-17, 129- 
143, 257-271, 385-401, 513-527, 641-654; vol. 20, pp. 1-15, 
129-143, 257-274, 385-397, 513-527, 641-658.^ 

The poem "The Triumph of Song " occurs in the number 
for Sept., 1867, vol. 20, pp. 264-265. 

* Hawthorne 

Atlantic Monthly, July, 1864, vol. 14, pp. 98-101. 

Pansie, by Nathaniel Hawthorne. His Last Literary Effort 

(London, Hotten), 1864, pp. 3-4. 
In this very rare little volume Dr. Holmes's article is 
printed as an introduction. 

* It is worth noting that "The Guardian Angel" occupied the place of 
honor at the head of the table of contents of the Atlantic throughout its 
course as a serial. 



[102] 

* Hillard, George S., Remarks on 

Proceedings of the Massachusetts Historical Society, Feb. 13, 
1879, vol. 17, pp. 38-40. 

* Holmes, Abiel 

Duyckinck's Cyclopsedia of American Literature, 1856, 
pp. 512-513. 

* Hobnes Estate, The 

Harvard Book, 1875, vol. ii, pp. 424-426. 

* Homoeopathic Domestic Physician, The [Review] 

Atlantic Monthly, Dec, 1857, vol. 1, pp. 250-252. 
See " Some More Recent Views," etc. 

* Homoeopathy, Report of a Committee of the Massachu- 
setts Medical Society on 

See "Report of a Committee," etc. 

HOMCEOPATHY, AND ITS KiNDRED DELUSIONS: TwO LcC- 

tures delivered before the Boston Society for the Diffu- 
sion of Useful Knowledge, 1842 

Currents and Counter-Currents in Medical Science, with 
Other Addresses and Essays, pp. 51-177 (Special Preface, 
pp. 53-55). 

Medical Essays, 1883. 

* How Far are the External Means of Exploring the Condi- 
tion of the Internal Organs to be considered Useful and 
Important in Medical Practice ? [Boylston Prize Disserta- 
tion for 1836] 

Library of Practical Medicine, vol. vii, 1836, pp. 189-288.^ 
Boylston Prize Dissertations for the Years 1836 and 1837 
(1838), pp. 245-371.2 

Human Wheel, The, its Spokes and Felloes [with cuts] 

Atlantic Monthly, May, 1863, vol. 11, pp. 567-580. 
Soundings from the Atlantic, 1864, pp. 282-327. 
See "The Physiology of Walking.'* 

* This volume contains the other prize dissertations of that year, on the 
same subject, by Drs. Robert W. Haxall and Luther V. Bell. 

' Here entitled, " On the Utility and Importance of Direct Exploration 
in Medical Practice." 



[ 103 ] 

Inevitable Trial, The (Oration delivered before the 
City Authorities of Boston, July 4, 1863) 
Soundings from the Atlantic, 1864. 
Pages from an Old Volume of Life, 1883. 

Intermittent Fever in New England 
See "Facts and Traditions," etc. 

* Introduction 

Huguenots in the Nipmuck Country or Oxford [Mass.] prior 

to 1713, by George F. Daniels, 1880, pp. x-xiv. 
The Introduction is in the shape of a letter to Mr. Daniels. 

* Introduction to Horatian Echoes 

Horatian Echoes [Translation of the Odes of Horace], by 
John O. Sargent, 1893, pp. vii-ix. 

"We began our literary life together. Hand in hand, Kke the 
Babes in the Wood, we ventured into the untried realm of letters : 
he, a college senior of twenty; I, a half -trained graduate of 
about the same age. Side by side our early productions appeared 
in the same periodicals.'* 

See under " The Collegian," infra, p. 202. 

* Introduction to Typical Elms, etc. 

Typical Elms and Other Trees of Massachusetts, by Lorin 
L. Dame, 1890, pp. 7-10. 

Iris [From the " Professor at the Breakfast-Table "] 

Little Classics, Rossiter Johnson, editor, 1875, vol. vii, pp. 
8-82. 

* Irving, Washington, Remarks on the Death of 

Proceedings of the Massachusetts Historical Society, Dec. 15, 
1859, vol. 4, pp. 418-422. 

* Jackson, Dr. James. A Biographical Sketch 

Boston Medical and Surgical Journal, Sept. 5, 1867, vol. 77, 
pp. 108-109. 

The original manuscript of this sketch, 12 pp., 4to, was pre- 
sented by Dr. Holmes to the Boston Medical Library Asso- 
ciation, May 1, 1876. 



[104] 

* Jackson's (Dr. James) Letters to a Young Man (just 
entering upon practice) [Review] 

Boston Medical and Surgical Journal, Oct. 4, 1855, vol. 53, 
pp. 197-206. 

* Leyden in the Time of the Puritans, Remarks on (based 
on certain passages in Scaligerana) 

Proceedings of the Massachusetts Historical Society, June 11, 
1874, vol. 13, pp. 315-317. 

* Light of Asia, The [Review of Sir Edwin Arnold's poem] 

International Review, Oct., 1879, pp. 345-372. 

* Livermore, George, Tribute to the Memory of 

Proceedings of the Massachusetts Historical Society, Sept. 
14, 1865, vol. 8, pp. 456-458. 

Tribute of the Massachusetts Historical Society to the Mem- 
ory of G. L., 1866, pp. 17-18. 

* Long and Interesting Friendship, A 

Cambridge [Mass.] Tribune, Feb. 20, 1892. Lowell Memorial 
Number. 

* Longfellow, Henry W., Tribute to 

Proceedings of the Massachusetts Historical Society, April 

13, 1882, vol. 19, pp. 269-275. 
Tributes to Longfellow and Emerson, 1882, pp. 13-22. 

* Lotus Club, Address at Dinner of, April 15, 1883 

A Brief History of the Lotus Club, by John Elderkin [c. 1895], 
pp. 61-64. 

* Love (Review) 

Atlantic Monthly, Sept., 1859, vol. 4, pp. 391-393. 
Lowell, James Russell 

See " A Long and Interesting Friendship." 

* Lowell, Hon. John, Speech at Dinner given to. May 23, 1884 

Reception and Dinner to Hon. John Lowell (pamphlet, 8vo), 

1885, pp. 29-32. 
"In respectfully proposing the health of his great-great- 
grandmother, I am speaking of one whom few, if any, of you 



[ 105 ] 

can remember. Yet her face is as familiar to me as that of any 
member of my own household. She looks upon me as I sit at 
my writing-table; she does not smile; she does not speak; even 
the green parrot on her hand has never opened his beak; but 
there she is, calm, unchanging, in her immortal youth, as when 
the untutored artist fixed her features on the canvas. To think 
that one little word from the lips of Dorothy Quincy, your great- 
great-grandmother, my great-great-grandmother, decided the 
question whether you and I should be here to-night, in fact 
whether we should be anywhere at all, or remain two bodiless 
dreams of nature! But it was Dorothy Quincy's yes or no to 
Edward Jackson which was to settle that important matter — 
important to both of us, certainly — yts, your Honor; and I 
can say truly, as I look to you and remember your career, 
important to this and the whole American community. ..." 
Dr. H. then recited portions of "Dorothy Q.," changing "I " 
to "we," "my" to "our," and, in one place, "me" to "we." 

* May and October 

[Buckingham's] New England Magazine, June, 1832, vol. 2, 
pp. 449-451. 

Mechanism in Thought and Morals 
Pages from an Old Volume of Life, 1883. 

* Mechanism of Vital Actions (Review of Draper's Human 

Physiology, Statical and Dynamical ; Carpenter's Mutual 
Relations of the Vital and Physical Forces; Grove's 
Correlation of Physical Forces; Metcalfe's Caloric: its 
Mechanical, Chemical, and Vital Agencies in the Phe- 
nomena of Nature) 

North American Review, July, 1857, vol. 75, pp. 39-77. 

Essays from the North American Review, Allen Thorndike 
Rice, editor, 1879, pp. 433-482. 

* Medical Directions, written for Governor Winthrop 
by Ed. Stafford of London, in 1643 

Proceedings of the Massachusetts Historical Society, Feb. 13, 

1862, vol. 5, pp. 379-399. 
"Dr. Holmes communicated the following paper, comment- 
ing upon and illustrating a manuscript written by an eminent 



[ 106 ] 

physician in England, and found in the collection of Winthrop 
Papers in the possession of the President of this Society." 

* Medical Highways and By-ways 

Boston Medical and Surgical Journal, June 1, 1882, vol. 106, 

pp. 505-513. 
Medical Times and Gazette [London], Sept. 16, 1882, vol. 2 

of that year, pp. 346-352. 

Medical Libraries. Dedicatory Address at the Opening 
of the New Building and Hall of the Boston Medical 
Library Association 

Boston Medical and Surgical Journal, Dec. 12, 1878, vol. 99, 

pp. 745-758. 
Medical Essays, 1883. 
See " Dedicatory Address," etc. 

Medical Profession in Massachusetts, The 

Lectures deHvered in a Course before the Lowell Institute in 

Boston, etc., 1869, pp. 257-301. 
Medical Essays, 1883. 

* Medical School, The 

Harvard Book, 1875, vol. i, pp. 239-251. 

* Medicine in Boston. Additional Memoranda ^ 

Memorial History of Boston, etc. (1881), vol. iv, pp. 549-570. 

* Microscopic Preparations 

Boston Medical and Surgical Journal, May 25, 1853, vol. 48, 
pp. 337-340. 

* Minister Plenipotentiary, The [Henry Ward Beecher] 

Atlantic Monthly, Jan., 1864, vol. 3, pp. 106-112. 

* Morse, Isaac E., Memorial Notice of 

Boston Daily Advertiser, March 5, 1866. 

Mr. Morse was a member of the Class of '29, from the South; 
he served in the Confederate army. See a letter to l^s son in 
Morse's Life and Letters of O. W. H., vol. i, pp. 310-312. 

^ The main article on this subject was written by Dr. Samuel A. Green. 



{ 



I 



[107] 

* Mothers and Infants, Nurses and Nursing [Review] 

Atlantic Monthly, May, 1859, vol. 3, p. 645. 

* Motley, John Lothrop, Memoir of 

Proceedings of the Massachusetts Historical Society, Dec. 12, 
1878, vol. 16, pp. 404-473. 

On p. 403 is the following note: "Dr. Holmes, through Mr. 
Winthrop, announced that the Memoir of John Lothrop Motley, 
which he had been appointed to prepare, would be published 
inomediately, by Messrs. Houghton, Osgood & Co., as had been 
agreed by the committee to whom their application for this privi- 
lege, made in Jime last, was referred. As the memoir had grown 
to a size greater than was expected at first, Dr. Holmes had 
revised the original draft, and had made numerous omissions 
so as to bring it within limits suited to publication in the Pro- 
ceedings." 

* Motley, John Lothrop, Tribute to 

Proceedings of the Massachusetts Historical Society, June 

14, 1877, vol. 15, pp. 292-297. 
Tribute of the Massachusetts Historical Society to the 

Memory of Edmund Quincy and John Lothrop Motley, 

1877, pp. 16-23. 

My Hunt after " the Captain " 

Atlantic Monthly, Dec, 1862, vol. 10, pp. 738-764. 
Soundings from the Atlantic, 1864, pp. 24-123. 
Pages from an Old Volume of Life, 1883. 
Favorite Poems, and My Hunt after the Captain, 1884. 
My Hunt after the Captain, and Other Papers, 1887. 

Neuralgia, On the Nature and Treatment of 

See "On the Nature," etc. 

New Portfolio, The 

Atlantic Monthly, Jan.-Dec, 1885, vol. 55, pp. 105-111, 
248-258, 403-414, 523-534, 678-691, 721-733; vol. 56, 
pp. 1-13, 145-157, 353-364, 522-533, 694-706, 836-847. 
Published under the title, " A Mortal Antipathy — First 
Opening of the New Portfolio." 

Li the number for May, 1885, is the poem "The Old Song," 
more familiarly known as "The Lyre of Anacreon." 



[108] 

* New Portfolio, The, II 

After the completion of the publication in serial form of the 
novel printed in the Atlantic under the above title (see above), 
Dr. Hohnes contributed to the same magazine, in January, 
March, and July, 1886, three articles under the same general 
title, but having no connection with the novel or with one 
another. See "A Cry from the Study," "Two 'Occasional' 
Poems with an Introduction," and "A Prospective Visit." 

* New Stand for the Compound Microscope 

Proceedings of the Department of Microscopy of the Boston 

Society of Natural History, Aug., 1857. 
Boston Medical and Surgical Journal, Dec. 10, 1857, vol. 52, 

pp. 376-380. 

* Old Books 

[Buckingham's] New England Magazine, Jan., 1832, vol. 2, 
pp. 46-49. 

* On the Nature and Treatment of Neuralgia 

Boylston Prize Dissertations for the Years 1836 and 1837 
(1838), pp. 133-243. 

* On the Use of Direct Light in Microscopic Researches 

Proceedings of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, 
May 4, 1852, vol. 2, pp. 326-332. 

* On the Utility and Importance of Direct Exploration in 
Medical Practice 

Boylston Prize Dissertations for the Years 1836 and 1837 

(1838), pp. 245-371. 
See "How Far are the External Means of Exploring," etc. 

* Oration before the New England Society of New 
York, at their semi-centennial anniversary, 1855 

Semi-Centennial Celebration of the New England Society in 
the City of New York, 1856, pp. 3-46. 

The New England Society Orations. Addresses, Sermons 
and Poems delivered before the New England Society in 
the City of New York, 1820-1855; Cephas and Evehne 
Warner Brainerd, editors, 1901, vol. ii, pp. 271-302. 



[ 109 ] 

In this volume the oration is introduced by the following note : 
"This year the society returned to its early custom, and a 
poem formed a part of the program. . . . The verses of Dr. 
Pierpont, though he was then over seventy years of age, would 
have been quoted with enthusiasm by the youngest and wildest 
abohtionist, while Dr. Holmes, his junior by thirty years, stood 
frankly for the most conservative element of the North. One 
sentiment of the orator in regard to slavery was met with a hiss, 
to which incident Dr. Pierpont referred at the dinner the follow- 
ing evening. 'I have prepared,' he said, *some lines, should it 
ever occm* again, which would run somewhat in the following 
fashion: 

" * Our brother Holmes's gadfly was a thing 
To lo known by its tormenting sting. 
The noisome insect still is known by this. 
But geese and serpents by their harmless hiss.* 

" Dr. Holmes, rising, instantly rephed: 

'* * Well said, my trusty brother, bravely done; 

Sit down, good neighbor, now I owe you one ! ' " 

* Our Battle-Laureate (H. H. Brownell) 

Atlantic Monthly, May, 1865, vol. 15, pp. 589-591. 

Our Hundred Days in Europe 

Atlantic Monthly, March to Oct., 1887, vol. 59, pp. 343-356, 

533-545, 638-649, 832-842; vol. 60, pp. 116-126, 213-225, 

289-299, 462-474. 

A small part of the article entitled " The New PortfoKo. A 

Prospective Visit," published in the Atlantic for July, 1886, 

was used as an introductory chapter when " Our Hundred Days " 

appeared in book form. 

* Our Progressive Independence 

Atlantic Monthly, April, 1864, vol. 13, pp. 497-512. 

Over the Teacups 

Atlantic Monthly, March, 1888, Jan. to Nov., 1890, vol. 61, 
pp. 323-328; vol. 65, pp. 111-121, 232-243, 402-412, 549- 
560, 691-703, 829-841; vol. 66, pp. 92-105, 236-248, 387- 
400, 535-547, 660-671. 



[110] 

The poems occur in the Atlantic in this order: 
To the Eleven Ladies, etc. 
After the Curfew. 

The Peau de Chagrin of State Street. 
Cacoethes Scribendi. 
The Rose and the Fern. 
I Like You and I Love You. 
La Maison d'Or. 
Too Young for Love. 
The Broomstick Train. 
Tartarus. 

At the Turn of the Road. 
Livita Minerva. 

*Parthenia [Review] 

Atlantic Monthly, Feb., 1858, vol. 1, pp. 509-510. 

Physiology of Versification, The. Harmonies of Organic 
and Animal Life 
Boston Medical and Surgical Journal, Jan. 7, 1875, vol. 92, 

pp. 6-9. 
Pages from an Old Volume of Life, 1883. 

Physiology of Walking, The 

Pages from an Old Volume of Life, 1883. 

My Hunt after the Captain, and Other Papers, 1888. 

See " The Human Wheel, its Spokes and Felloes." 

* Pillow-Smoothing Authors 

Atlantic Monthly, April, 1883, vol. 51, pp. 457-464. 
Poet at the Breakfast-Table, The 

Atlantic Monthly, Jan. to Dec, 1872, vol. 29, pp. 90-104, 224- 

236, 338-349, 485-496, 606-618, 731-742; vol. 30, pp. 98- 

110, 225-239, 352-363, 426-437, 513-526, 720-734. 
The poems occur in the Atlantic in this order: 

Homesick in Heaven. 

Fantasia. 

Aunt Tabitha. 

J[oseph] A[ngier]. 

Wind Clouds and Star-Drifts, I to VII. 

Epilogue to the Breakfast-Table Series. 



[Ill] 

* Poet, to the Children, The (Letter to the School Children 
of Cincinnati, on their celebration of his 71st Birthday) 

Holmes Leaflets, 1881, p. 11. 

* Position and Prospects of the Medical Student, 

The 
Currents and Counter-Currents in Medical Science, with 
Other Addresses and Essays, 1861. 

Professor at the Breakfast-Table, The 

Atlantic Monthly, Jan. to Dec, 1859, vol. 3, pp. 85-96, 232- 

241, 350-361, 492-503, 609-620, 760-770 ; vol. 4, pp. 119- 

128, 232-243, 369-379, 500-511, 622-634, 751-766. 
The poems occur in the Atlantic in this order : 

De Sauty. 

The Boys. 

The Opening of the Piano. 

[At a Birthday Festival — To J. R. Lowell.] * 

The Crooked Footpath. 

A Mother's Secret. 

Robinson of Leyden. 

Saint Anthony the Reformer — His Temptation. 

Midsummer. 

Iris, Her Book. 

Under the Violets. 

Hjonn of Trust. 

A Sun-Day Hymn. 
The " Story of Iris," which is told piecemeal, so to speak, 
in the " Professor," has been put together and published sepa- 
rately. See p. 171, injra. 

Professor*s Story, The 

Atlantic Monthly, Jan., 1860, to April, 1861, vol. 5, pp. 88-99, 

222-235, 347-357, 470-486, 602-614. 735-746; vol. 6, 

pp. 95-105, 215-227, 362-373, 482-492, 613-631, 729-739; 

vol. 7, pp. 75-85, 214-226, 272-283, 395-415. 

Published in book form, at first in two volumes, in 1861, 

under the title of "Elsie Venner." 

^ Without title in the Atlantic and in the various editions of the 
" Professor." 



[ 112 ] 

* Prospective Visit, A 

Atlantic Monthly, July, 1886, vol. 58, pp. 1-16. 

A small portion of this article — roughly speaking, the first 
and last three pages — was afterward printed as an intro- 
ductory chapter to Our Hundred Days in Europe, 1887; 
there are some changes, however, even in those passages 
which were used in the volume. 

See "The New Portfolio," II. 

* Public Parks, Speech on the subject of 

Parks for the People (8vo pamphlet), 1876, pp. 20-25. 

Puerperal Fever as a Private Pestilence 

Currents and Counter-Currents in Medical Science, with 
Other Addresses and Essays, 1861. 

This essay was printed originally (1843) under the title "The 
Contagiousness of Puerperal Fever," and that title was restored 
when it was published in Medical Essays, 1883. 

Pulpit and the Pew, The 

North American Review, Feb., 1881, vol. 132, pp. 117-138. 
Pages from an Old Volume of Life, 1883. 

* Reflex Vision 

Proceedings of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, 
Feb. 14, 1860, vol. 4, pp. 373-375. 

* Reply of Dr. Holmes on the Presentation of the Portrait 
of Dr. J. B. S. Jackson to the Boston Medical Library 
Association [May 23, 1881] 

Boston Medical and Surgical Journal, June 16, 1881, vol. 104, 
pp. 560-561. 

* Report of a Committee of the Massachusetts Medical 
Society on Homoeopathy 

Boston Medical and Surgical Journal, March 5, 1851, vol. 44, 

pp. 97-100. 
The report is signed by George Hayward, John B. S. Jackson, 
and Dr. Holmes. 



[113] 

Report of the Committee on the Plowing-Match at the 
Cattle-Show of the Berkshire Agricultural Society, 1849 

The Poet among the Hills (J. E. A. Smith), 1895, pp. 129-133; 

closing with the poem, "The Ploughman" (here spelled 

Plowman). 
Poems, Cambridge Edition, 1895, pp. 339-340, Appendix. 

* Response of Dr. Holmes at the banquet to his honour by 
the Liverpool Philomathic Society, 1886 

Response to the Toast "The President of the United States," 
together with the response of the Guest of the Evening, 
Dr. Oliver Wendell Holmes, at the banquet to his honour 
by the Liverpool Philomathic Society, August 20th, 1886, 
pp. 11-13.1 

Scholastic and Bedside Teaching. An Introductory Lecture 
delivered before the Medical Class of Harvard University, 
Nov. 6, 1867 

Medical Essays, 1883. 

See " Teaching from the Chair and at the Bedside." 

* Seasons, The. By the " Autocrat of the Breakfast-Table " 

The Atlantic Almanac, 1868, edited by Oliver Wendell 
Holmes and Donald G. Mitchell, pp. 2-13. 

* Sex in Education [Review] 

Atlantic Monthly, Dec, 1873, vol. 32, pp. 737-740. 

* Some More Recent Views on Homoeopathy. A Notice of 
the Homoeopathic Domestic Physician 

Atlantic Monthly, Dec, 1857, vol. 1, pp. 250-252; under the 
title "The Homoeopathic Domestic Physician." 

Currents and Counter-Currents in Medical Science, with 
Other Addresses and Essays, 1861. 

^ This is a 12mo pamphlet of 16 unnumbered pages, with a decorative 
front cover; the collation is as follows: 1-2, blank; 3, dedication, signed 
H[arold] M[arsh] S[ewall], and dated Liverpool, England, Sept. 1, 1866. — 
"For Private Circulation;" 4-6, blank; 7-9, response by Harold Marsh 
Sewall to the above-named toast; 10, blank; 11-13, response of Dr. Holmes 
to the toast to himself ; 14, blank; 15, verse; 16, blank. 



[ 114 ] 

Some of my Early Teachers. Dr. Holmes's Farewell 
Address to the Medical School 
Medical Essays, 1883. 
See " Farewell Address," etc. 

* Speech at the Annual Dmner of the Massachusetts 
Medical Society, May, 1856 

Speeches of Drs. Thompson, James Jackson, John Homans, 
O. W. Holmes, S. Durkee, and H. W. Williams, in response 
to sentiments offered at the Annual Dinner, etc., 1856, 
pp. 9-11. 

* Speech at the Dinner of the Alumni of Harvard College, 

Nov., 1886 
Record of the Commemoration, November fifth to eighth, 
1886, etc. (1887), pp. 302-304. 

* Speech at the First Dinner of the Phillips Academy Alumni 
Association, March 24, 1886 

Speeches at the First Dinner, etc., 1886, pp. 21-26. "Bill and 
Joe" is introduced on pp. 23-24. 

"Brethren of the Alumni: I had a call this morning from 
that most formidable of visitors, the reporter, who asked me for 
the poem I was going to read to-night, which poem was a fiction 
of his own powerful imagination. It is sixty-one years since I 
read my first verses at Phillips Academy. It is eight years since 
I read a long poem on the celebration of the one hundredth 
anniversary of the institution. . . . 

" I am going to read you a poem, written for another occasion, 
but surely it never could be read more appropriately than it is now. 
As the gray heads come together the young ones will sympathize 
with them, but the gray heads as they meet their old companions 
feel that all their differences of situation, of history, of condition, 
are abolished, and this poem embodies that feeling. Will you 
listen to ' Bill and Joe, ' to two gray-headed old men who meet, 
one, perhaps, high in position, the other humble, struggling to 
forget all their differences, and strip off everything, and call 
each other by the old names, the old short names ? There are 
not more than half a dozen people now living, out of my own 
family, that call me by my first name. Queen Victoria said, 
* There is nobody left to call me "Vic."' It is a dreadful loss 



[ 115 ] 

when you lose your *Bill/ and become the Honorable So-and- 
So. . . . 

" I was subjected to the severest castigation known, I believe, 
in the annals of punishment in the institution, such as made a 
sensation among all the deUcate females of the vicinity, and 
caused young men to utter violent threats, and was, in fact, al- 
most the occasion of a riot. It was an unfortunate display of 
temper on the part of one of the instructors. [Laughter and 
applause.] Forty years afterward I heard a knock at my study 
door, and an old, bending man came in and looked me in the 
eyes, and I in his. I knew what he came for. [Laughter.] He 
knew, too well, what he came for. [Renewed laughter.] But we 
made the usual meteorological remarks [great laughter] and 
we sat down, I with a cold and calm hospitality; he, evidently, 
laboring under some inward embarrassment. Presently it came 
out, the confession and the pardon came out, and after that we 
were, though separated — and he is now dead or I would not 
mention it — we were good friends, so far as friendship could 
base itself upon such a foundation." [Great laughter.] 

* Speech at the Graduating Exercises of the Pittsfield Young 
Ladies' Institute, 1849 

The Poet among the Hills (J. E. A. Smith), 1895, pp. 110-111 ; 
concluding with the previously unpublished poem, "A 
Vision of Life." 

* Speech at the " Jubilee Dinner " at Pittsfield, Aug. 23, 
1844 

The Poet among the Hills (J. E. A. Smith), 1895, pp. 65-66; 
followed by the poem, "Come back to your mother, ye 
children, for shame." (" Lines recited at the Berkshire 
Festival.") 

* Stereoscope and the Stereograph, The 

Atlantic Monthly, June, 1859, vol. 3, pp. 738-748. 
Soundings from the Atlantic, 1864, pp. 124-165. 

* Storer, Dr. David Humphrey, Tribute to 

Memorial Meeting of the Boston Society of Natural His- 
tory, Dec. 16, 1891, pp. 353-354. 



[116] 

* Sun-Painting and Sun-Sculpture 

Atlantic Monthly, July, 1861, vol. 8, pp. 13-29. 
Soundings from the Atlantic, 1864, pp. 166-227. 

Talk concerning the Human Body and its Management. 
By the Professor at the Breakfast-Table 
The Atlantic Almanac, 1869, edited by Donald G. Mitchell, 

pp. 47-58. 
Pages from an Old Volume of Life, 1883. 

* Taylor, Bayard, Tribute to the Memory of 

See Appendix, p. 310, injra. 

* Two " Occasional " Poems with an Introduction 

Atlantic Monthly, March, 1886, vol. 57, pp. 369-374. 

See "The New PortfoKo," II. The poems are "The Old 
Tune. Thirty-Sixth Variation " and "To Frederick Henry 
Hedge." 

* Undergraduate, The [Review] 

Atlantic Monthly, March, 1860, vol. 5, pp. 382-383. 

Valedictory Address to the Graduating Class of 
Bellevue Hospital College, March 2, 1871 
New York Medical Journal, April, 1871, vol. 13, pp. 420-440. 
See "The Young Practitioner." 

* Valedictory Address to the Medical Graduates 
OF Harvard University, 1858 

Boston Medical and Surgical Journal, March 25, 1858, vol. 58, 

pp. 149-159. 
Currents and Counter-Currents in Medical Science, with 

Other Addresses and Essays, 1861. 

* Visit to the Asylum for Aged and Decayed Punsters, A 

Atlantic Monthly, Jan., 1861, vol. 7, pp. 113-117. 
Soundings from the Atlantic, 1864, pp. 348-361. 

* Visit to the Autocrat's Landlady, A 

Atlantic Monthly, Nov., 1858, vol. 2, pp. 738-744. 
Soundings from the Atlantic, 1864, pp. 328-347. 
Contains the poem "The Old Man of the Sea — A Night- 
mare Dream by Daylight." See p. 52, supra. 



[117] 

* Warren, Dr. John Collins, Tribute to 

The Life of John Collins Warren, M.D., by Edward Warren, 
1860, vol. ii, pp. 296-302. 

* Warren, Dr. J. Mason, Remarks on the Character of 

Boston Medical and Surgical Journal, Aug. 22, 1867, vol. 77, 
pp. 66-68. 

* Week of Frailty, A 

[Buckingham's] New England Magazine, Oct., 1831, vol. 1, 
pp. 316-320. 

Signed O. W. H. Contains two poems without title, one of 
which has had its place in all collected editions under the title 
"L'Inconnue;" the other, which has never been reprinted, 
begins: "Hast thou a look for me, love.?^" 

* Wormwood Cordial of History, The 

Atlantic Monthly, Oct., 1861, vol. 8, pp. 507-512. 

* Wyman, Professor Jeffries 

Atlantic Monthly, Nov., 1874, vol. 34, pp. 611-623. 

Proceedings of the Massachusetts Historical Society, April 15, 
1875, vol. 14, pp. 4-24. 

A copy of this last-named pamphlet (which contains also the 
poem "Grandmother's Story of Bunker Hill Battle"), with an 
autograph letter of Dr. Holmes inserted, was sold at the Arnold 
Sale, 1901, for $10.00; another at the Pyser Sale, 1906, for $3.00. 

Young Practitioner, The. A Valedictory Address delivered 
to the Graduating Class of the Bellevue Hospital College, 
March 2, 1871 
Medical Essays, 1883. 



CHRONOLOGICAL LIST OF SINGLE 
PUBLICATIONS 

I 

POETRY 

The first entry in this list is placed here, although it contains 
poems by other hands than Dr. Holmes's, because it may pro- 
perly be regarded as the first collected edition of his poems. In like 
manner the various issues of the Songs of the Class of '29 are 
included in this division ; although they contain the work of sev- 
eral other members of the Class, they are generally, and not 
unnaturally, regarded as special collections of Dr. Holmes's poems. 
The magazines in which his earliest productions were printed are 
placed, for convenience, if not most appropriately, under the 
heading Selections and Compilations. 

THE HARBINGER 

The Harbinger: | A | May-Gift. | Boston: | Car- 
ter, Hendee and Co, \ mdcccxxxiii. 
8vo, pp. vi, 96. 

Dedicated " To the Ladies who have so kindly aided the 
New England Institution for the Blind." 

A collection of poems divided into three parts, viz.: Part I, 
by Park Benjamin, pp. 1-30; Part II, by Oliver Wendell Holmes, 
pp. 31-61; Part III, by John O. Sargent, pp. 63-96. The 
authors' names do not appear. 
Part II contains: — 

The Dying Seneca. 

* The Departure. 

The Last Leaf. 

The Ballad of the Oysterman. 

From a Bachelor's Private Journal. 

Domestic Thoughts. 



[ 119 ] 

Lines by a Very Interesting Young Man. 

My Aunt. 

The Dilemma. 

" Is thy Name Mary, Maiden Fair " (L'Inconnue). 

* The Two Shadows. 

Thoughts in Dejection (The Poet's Lot). 

To an Insect. 

The Toadstool. 

Evening. 

Moonshine. 

Stanzas. 
Of these seventeen poems, all save the first — "The 
Dying Seneca " — had previously appeared in the Colle- 
gian, the Amateur, or Buckingham's New England 
Magazine. 

POEMS, 1836 

Poems. | By | Oliver Wendell Holmes. | Boston : | 
Otis, Broaders, and Company, \ m dccc xxxvi. 
8vo, pp. xvi, 164. The collation is as follows : 
i, half-title; ii, blank; iii, title; iv, copyright, 
and imprint (Cambridge: Printed by Folsom, 
Wells, and Thurston); v-xii, preface; xiii-xiv, 
contents; xv, haK-title ("Poetry: a Metrical 
Essay"); xvi, blank; 1, dedication (To Charles 
Wentworth Upham the following Metrical 
Essay is affectionately inscribed); 2, blank; 
3-39, "Poetry;" 40, blank; 41-44, notes to 
"Poetry;" 45, half-title (Lyrics); 46, blank; 
47-163, lyrics; 164, colophon (Cambridge: 
Folsom, Wells, and Thurston). 

Some copies have on the title-page, just above the date, 
the additional imprint : " New York : | George Dearborn 
and Company." 

On pp. 16-20 is printed (without separate title) "The 
Cambridge Churchyard," and on pp. 24-25 (likewise 



[ 120 ] 

without title), " Old Ironsides." In the contents, these 
familiar titles appear as sub-titles under "Poetry." 
The Preface is as follows: — 

As the poem which stands at the head of this collection was 
received kindly enough to warrant its publication, I have 
availed myself of this occasion as an apology for offering a Uttle 
book to the public. Among the poems which it contains are 
several, which the wishes of others rather than my own have 
led me to admit. Besides, having written comparatively Uttle, 
and nothing of late years, until within a few months, I could 
ill afford to be over nice in my selection, unless I were willing 
to reduce my volume to dimensions odious alike to the self-love 
of authors and the cupidity of booksellers. If the good-natured 
reader, then, should find some pages a little overduU, or over- 
extravagant, let him take it for granted, that they were reluct- 
antly admitted by the author in consideration of the exigencies 
of the publisher. 

The first poem in the collection being somewhat discursive, 
I will point out, in a few words, its scope and connexion. Its 
object is to express some general truths on the sources and the 
machinery of Poetry; to sketch some changes which may be 
supposed to have taken place in its history, constituting four 
grand eras; and to point out some less obvious manifestations 
of the poetic principle. The stages assigned to the progress 
of poetry are as follow: — 

I. The period of Pastoral and Descriptive Poetry; which 
allowed a digression upon Rome, and the introduction of a 
descriptive lyric. ^ 

II. The period of Martial Poetry. At the close of this division 
are some remarks on our want of a national song, and an attempt 
is made to enhven the poem by introducing a lyric ^ which deals 
in martial images and language, although written only for an 
occasional purpose. 

III. The Epic or Historic period of Poetry. Under this 
division of the subject, the supposed necessity of an American 
"IHad" was naturally enough touched upon. 

IV. The period of Dramatic Poetry, or that which analyzes, 
and traces from their origin, the passions excited by certain 
combinations of circumstances. As this seemed the highest 

1 "The Cambridge Churchyard." ^ «oid Ironsides." 



[ 121 ] 

reach of poetical art, so it constitutes the last of my supposed 
epochs. 

The remarks contained in the last division relate to some of 
the different forms in which poetry has manifested itself, and to 
a pseudo-poetical race of invalids, whose melanchohc notions 
are due, much oftener than is supposed, to the existence of 
pulmonary disease, frequently attributed to the morbid state 
of mind of which it is principally the cause. The allusions 
introduced at the close will carry their own explanation to all 
for whom they were intended. I have thus given a general 
analysis of a poem which, being written for public dehvery, 
required more variety than is commonly demanded in metrical 
essays. 

The shorter pieces are arranged mainly with reference to the 
dignity of their subjects. A few remarks with regard to a species 
of writing in which the author has occasionally indulged, are 
offered to the consideration of those who are disposed to criti- 
cise rigorously; without the intention, however, of justifying 
all or any of the attempts at comic poetry, if they are bad speci- 
mens of their kind. 

The extravagant is often condemned as unnatural; as if a 
tendency of the mind, shown in all ages and forms, had not its 
foundation in nature. A series of hyperbolical images is con- 
sidered beneath criticism by the same judges who would write 
treatises upon the sculptured satyrs and painted arabesques of 
antiquity, which are only hyperbole in stone and colors. As 
material objects in different lights repeat themselves in shadows 
variously elongated, contracted, or exaggerated, so our solid 
and sober thoughts caricature themselves in fantastic shapes 
inseparable from their originals, and having a unity in their 
extravagance, which proves them to have retained their propor- 
tion in certain respects, however differing in outline from their 
prototypes. To illustrate this by an example. Our idea of 
a certain great nation, an idea founded in substantial notions 
of its geography, its statistics, its history, in one aspect of the 
mind stretches into the sublime in the image of Britannia 
and in another dilates into the sub-ridiculous in the person of 
John Bull. Both these personifications partially represent 
their object; both are useful and philosophical. And I am not 
afraid to say to the declaimers upon dignity of composition, that 
a metrical arabesque of a storm or a summer, if its images. 



[ im ] 

though hyperbolical, are conceivable, and consistent with each 
other, is a perfectly healthy and natural exercise of the im- 
agination, and not, as some might think, a voluntary degradation 
of its oflfice. I argue, as I said before, for a principle, and not 
for my own attempt at its illustration. 

I had the intention of pointing out some accidental plagiarisms, 
or coincidences as they might be more mildly called, discovered 
principally by myself after the composition of the passages 
where they occur; but as they are, so far as I know, both inno- 
cent and insignificant, and as I have sometimes had Hterary 
pickpockets at my own skirts, I will leave them, hke the apples 
of Atalanta, as an encouragement to sagacious critics, should 
any such follow my footsteps. 

I have come before the pubhc like an actor who returns to 
fold his robes and make his bow to the audience. Already 
engaged in other duties, it has been with some effort, that I 
have found time to adjust my own mantle; and I now willingly 
retire to more quiet labors, which, if less exciting, are more 
certain to be acknowledged as useful and received with grati- 
tude; thankful that, not having staked all my hopes upon a 
single throw, I can sleep quietly after closing the last leaf of my 
little volume. O. W. H. 

Boston, Massachusetts, 1 November, 1836. 
Contents : — 

Poetry: a Metrical Essay. 

The Last Reader. 

Our Yankee Girls. 

La Grisette. 

An Evening Thought. 

A Souvenir. 

"Qui Vive." 

The Wasp and the Hornet. 

From a Bachelor's Private Journal. 

Stanzas. 

The Philosopher to his Love. 

L'Inconnue. 

The Star and the Water Lily. 

Illustration of a Picture. 

The Dying Seneca. 

A Portrait. 

A Roman Aqueduct. 



[ 123] 

The Last Prophecy of Cassandra. 

To a Caged Lion. 

To my Companions. 

The Last Leaf. 

To a Blank Sheet of Paper. 

To an Insect. 

The Dilemma. 

My Aunt. 

The Toadstool. 

The Meeting of the Dryads. 

The Mysterious Visiter.^ 

The Spectre Pig. 

Lines by a Clerk. 

Reflections of a Proud Pedestrian. 

The Poet's Lot. 

Daily Trials. 

Evening. By a Tailor. 

The Dorchester Giant. 

To the Portrait of "A Gentleman." 

To the Portrait of "A Lady." 

The Comet. 

A Noontide Lyric. 

The Ballad of the Oysterman. 

The Music-Grinders. 

The Treadmill Song. 

The September Gale. 

The Height of the Ridiculous. 

The Hot Season. 

POEMS, 1846 
Poems. | By | Oliver Wendell Holmes. | London: | 

0. Rich & Sons, 12, Red Lion Square. | 

MDCCCXLVI. 

12mo, pp. xxiv, 176. Collation is as follows: 

1, half-title; ii, blank; iii, title; iv, imprint 
(London : Bradbury and Evans, Printers, 
Whitef riars) ; v. Note by the English Pub- 

^ The word is so spelled in all impressions of the edition of 1849, after 
which it was changed to Visitor. 



[ lU] 

lisher; ^ vi, blank; vii-xii, preface to the first 
American edition; xiii-xv, contents; xvi, blank; 
xvii-xx, Memoir of the Author; ^ xxi, half-title 
('* Poetry: a Metrical Essay'*); xxii, blank; 
xxiii, dedication; 1-34, "Poetry;" 35-38, notes 
on ''Poetry;" 39, half-title (Miscellaneous 
Poems); 40, blank; 41-175, poems; 176, colo- 
phon (London : Bradbury and Evans, Printers, 
Whitefriars). 

The first English edition of the Poems, although the 
title-page of the Routledge edition of 1852 tells a different 
story, which Dr. Holmes's remarks regarding the present 
edition in his preface to that of 1849 {infra, p. 126) may 
partly explain. The poems contained in the edition of 
1836 are reprinted without change, except that "To my 
Companions" precedes "To a Caged Lion." The vol- 
ume contains these additional poems : — 

Lines recited at the Cambridge Phi Beta Kappa Society's 

Dinner [1844]. 
Terpsichore. 
The Parting Word. 
Lines recited at the Berkshire Festival. 
Song, written for the Annual Dinner of the New York 

Mercantile Library Association. 
Departed Days. 
The Steamboat. 
Song, written for the Dinner given to Charles Dickens, by 

the Young Men of Boston. 
The Only Daughter. 

^ " Those poems which follow 'The Hot Season,' on page 141, are here 
collected for the first time from magazines and other sources, available 
to the English Editor." 

' From Griswold's Poets and Poetry of America. 



[125] 

URANIA: A RHYMED LESSON 

[Ornament] Urania: | a Rhymed Lesson. | 
By Oliver Wendell Holmes. | Pronounced be- 
fore the Mercantile Library Association, | 
October 14, 1846. | Boston: | William D, Tick- 
nor & Company. \ mdcccxlvi. 

Pamphlet, 8vo, pp. 32, viz. : 1, title; 2, copy- 
right, and imprint (Boston: Printed by Free- 
man and BoUes, Devonshire Street); 3-31, 
poem; 32, notes. 

A second edition was published in the same year, 
identical with the above, except that the words " Second 
Edition " are added on the title-page, below the date. 

In a letter to J. R. Lowell, dated Nov. 29, 1846, 
printed in Morse's Life and Letters, vol. i, 295-303, Dr. 
Holmes answers certain strictures of Lowell, and dis- 
cusses the poem and his own views as reflected therein. 

POEMS, 1849 
Poems. | By | Oliver Wendell Holmes. | New and 
Enlarged Edition. | [Cut] Boston: | William D, 
Ticknor & Company. \ m dccc xlix. | [c. 1848.] 
8vo, pp. xii, 272; numerous vignettes and 
tail-pieces. The collation is as follows: i, half- 
title; ii, blank; iii, title; iv, copyright, and 
imprint (Boston: Thurston, Torry and Emer- 
son, 31 Devonshire Street); v-vi, From a 
Letter of the Author to the Publishers; vii-x, 
contents; xi, dedication of "Poetry;" xii, 
blank; 1-35, "Poetry;" 36, blank; 37-40, 
notes on "Poetry;" 41, half-title (Lyrics); 
42, cut; 43-160, lyrics; 161, half-title (Poems 
added since the First Edition); 162, cut; 



[ 126 ] 

163-192, poems; 193-226, "Urania, a Rhymed 
Lesson;" 227-228, notes on "Urania;" 229- 
272, poems. 

The extract "from a letter of the Author," printed as 
preface to this somewhat rare volume, reads as follows : 

As these productions are to be given to the public again at 
your particular request, I must trust that you will make all 
proper explanations. I need hardly remind you that a part of 
them appeared in a volume published about a dozen years ago ; 
that when this volume had been some time out of print, another 
edition was printed, at your suggestion, in London, but I suppose 
sold principally in this country; and that the present edition is 
pubUshed to please you rather than to gratify myself. You 
will, therefore, take the entire responsibility of the second and 
third appearances, except so far as my consent involved me in 
the transaction. 

Let me remark, also, that it was only to suit your wishes 
that several copies of verses, which sound very much like school 
exercises, were allowed to remain unexpunged. If any body 
takes the trouble to attack them, you may say that they belong 
to the department of '* Early " or "Juvenile" Poems, and should 
be so ticketed. But stand up for the new verses, especially those 
added in this edition. Say that those two names, ''Terpsichore " 
and "Urania," may perhaps sound a little fantastic, but were 
merely intended as suggestive titles, and faU back upon Herodo- 
tus. Say that many of the lesser poems were written for meetings 
more or less convivial, and must of course show something like 
the fire-work frames on the morning of July 5th. If any objection 
is made to that bacchanaKan song, say that the author entirely 
recedes from several of the sentiments contained in it, especially 
that about strong drink being a national want. But ask, if a 
few classical reminiscences at a banquet may not be quite as 
Hke to keep out something worse, as to stand in the way of 
something better. 

If any thing pleasant should be said about the "new edition," 
you may snip it out of the paper and save it for me. If contrary 
opinions are expressed, be so good as not to mark with brackets, 
carefully envelop, and send to me, as is the custom with many 
friends. 



[H7] 

I have looked over the proof-sheets pretty accurately, and 
arranged the poems in something like order. The first one hun- 
dred and fifty-eight pages contain all that were printed in the 
edition of 1837 [1836]; the next thirty-two pages were added 
in that of 1846; the remaining ones are now added. 

You can take this note of mine as the basis of some kind of 
programme or advertisement; but that "Preface" and "Biogra- 
phy" ^ made rather too heavy a portico for so sHght a structure 
as the volume they introduced, and had better be abstracted. 

The "Poems added since the First Edition" include 
all of those added in the edition of 1846 except "The 
Only Daughter," but arranged in a different order; also 
the following, which had not previously been collected : 

Urania : a Rhymed Lesson (which had aheady appeared as a 

separate pubhcation). 
The Pilgrim's Vision. 
A Modest Request. 
Nux Postccenatica. 
On Lending a Punch-BowL 
The Stethoscope Song. 
Extracts from a Medical Poem. 
A Song of Other Days. 
A Sentiment ("The Pledge of Friendship," etc.). 

The Same. Boston: | Tichnor, Reed & Fields. \ 
MDCCCXLIX. I [c. 1848.] 
8vo, pp. xii, 286. 

This second issue of the Poems of 1849 differs from 
that bearing the imprint of W. D. Ticknor & Co. in the 
following respects: — 

The imprint on p. iv (back of title) is, "Stereotyped 
by George A. Curtis; New England Type and Stereo- 
type Foundery \sic\ Boston. Printed by Thurston, Torry 
& Co., 31 Devonshire Street." The prefatory matter on 
pp. v-vi is headed "The Author to the Publisher," and 
is entirely different from the corresponding matter in the 
earlier issue. It reads as follows: — 

* [Referring to the London edition of 1846.] 



[128] 

I thank you for the pains you have taken to bring together 
the poems now added to this collection; one of them having 
been accidentally omitted, and the existence of the others for- 
gotten. So many productions which bear the plain marks of 
immaturity and inexperience have been allowed to remain, 
because they were in the earher editions, that a few occasional 
and careless stanzas may be added to their company without 
any apology. I have no doubt you are right in thinking that 
there is no harm in allowing a few crudities to keep their place 
among the rest; for, as you suggest, the readers of a book are of 
various ages and tastes, and what sounds altogether schoolboy- 
Uke to the author may be very author-like to the schoolboy. 
Some of the more questionable extravagances to be found in the 
earher portion of the volume, have, as I learn, pleased a good 
many young people; let us call these, and all the others that we 
have outgrown. Juvenile Poems, but keep them, lest some of 
the smaller sort that were, or are, or are to be, should lament 
their absence. I thought of mentioning the date at which the 
several poems were written, which would explain some of their 
differences; but the reader can judge them nearly enough, per- 
haps, without this assistance. 

To save a question that is sometimes put, it is proper to say, 
that in naming two of the poems after two of the Muses, nothing 
more was intended than a suggestion of their general character 
and aim. In a former note of mine (which you printed as a kind 
of preface to the last edition), I made certain explanations 
which I thought might be needed; but as nobody seems to have 
misinterpreted any thing, we will trust our book hereafter to 
itself, not doubting that whatever is good in it will redeem and 
justify the rest. 

Boston, January 13th, 1849. 

The poems referred to in the first sentence of the above 
are ^yg in number, to wit : " The Only Daughter " (the 
one accidentally omitted), "Lexington," "The Island 
Hunting-Song," "Questions and Answers," and "A, 
Song for the Centennial Celebration of Harvard College, 
1836." They are not added at the end of those printed 
in the earlier issue, but are inserted at pp. 182-195, 
between the "Song for a Temperance Dinner" and 



[129] 

" Terpsicbiore," so that the pagination in the two issues 
corresponds only to p. 181. "Terpsichore" begins on 
p. 196, instead of on p. 182, as in the earlier issue, and 
the fourteen additional pages are thus accounted for. 

This edition, in its final form, was reprinted many 
times, — nearly every year until 1861. In the reprint of 
1851, a frontispiece portrait of Dr. Holmes was first 
added to the other embellishments of the volume. 

ASTR.EA 
Astr^a: I THE Balance of Illusions. | A 
Poem I delivered before the | Phi Beta Kappa 
Society of Yale College, | August 14, 1850, | 
by I Oliver Wendell Holmes. | Published by 
request of the Society. | Boston: | Ticknor, 
Reed, and Fields. \ mdcccl. 

12mo, pp. 39; viz.: 1, title; 2, copyright, and 
imprint (Boston: Thurston, Torry & Company, 
Printers, Devonshire Street); 3-39, poem. 

There are copies in boards, others in cloth. 

This poem has never again been printed as written, 
except in the collection published in London (Routledge) 
in 1852. In Songs in Many Keys (1862) certain excerpts 
from it were printed in the group called Pictures from 
Occasional Poems, under these titles: "Spring," "The 
Study," "The Bells," " Non-Resistance," "The Moral 
Bully," and "The Mind's Diet," and they have con- 
tinued to be so printed in the Household and all other 
collected editions. 

In the Cambridge (1895) and Cabinet (1899) editions, 
the balance of the poem is printed in the Appendix, with 
indication of the original position of the above-named 
passages. 

The following lines from that portion of "Astrsea" 
which is now published under the title "Spring," were 
printed in Silhouettes and Songs, Illustrative of the 



[ 130 ] r\ 

Months, E. E. Hale, editor, 1876. "April" is the title 

there given to them. 

At last young April, ever fresh and fair. 

Wooed by her playmate with the golden hair. 

Chased to the margin of receding floods 

O'er the soft meadows starred with opening buds, 

In tears and blushes sighs herself away. 

And hides her cheek beneath the flowers of May. 

DEDICATION OF PITTSFIELD CEMETERY 

A Poem | by Oliver Wendell Holmes, | delivered 
at the dedication of the | Pittsfield Cemetery, | 
September 9, 1850. 

Pamphlet, 8vo, pp. 8; viz.: 1, title; 2, blank; 
3-8, poem. 

This poem was printed also in a pamphlet containing 
the Rev. Mr. Neill's address, and other matter relating 
to the dedication. For a description of various forms of 
this pamplilet, see Appendix, p. 311, infra. 

POEMS, 1852 

The I Poetical Works | of | Oliver Wendell 
Holmes. | First English Edition. | London: | 
G, Routledge & Co., Farringdon Street, j 

MDCCCLII. 

32mo, pp. xvi, 296; illustrated; engraved 
half-title. Pp. iii-iv, The Author to the (Amer- 
ican) Publisher [as in Poems, 1849, 2d issue]; 
v-viii, contents; ix-xiv, introduction; xv-xvi, 
poem, " To an English Friend ; " 1-35, " Poetry : 
a Metrical Essay;" ^ 36-46, "Terpsichore;" 
47-81, "Urania;" 82-115, "Astrsea;" 116-291, 
lyrics; 292-296, notes. 

* "The Cambridge Churchyard" and "Old Ironsides" are set apart 
in the table of contents, but not by title in the text. 



[ 131 ] 

The lyrics include all the poems printed in the 2d 
issue of the edition of 1849, in the order there adopted, 
except for "Terpsichore" and "Urania;" also "The 
Ploughman," the " Poem for the Dedication of Pittsfield 
Cemetery," and the introductory lines "To an English 
Friend." 

The notes to " Poetry " and to " Urania " are here 
printed at the end of the volume ; in other early editions 
they follow the poems to which they respectively refer. 

AMERICAN MEDICAL ASSOCIATION 

Response | of | Oliver Wendell Holmes, M. D., | 
to the following Toast, proposed at the Enter- 
tainment given to the American | Medical 
Association, by the Physicians of the City of 
New York, | at Metropolitan Hall, on the 
5th of May, 1853. | 

Toast. — "The union of Science and Litera- 
ture — a happy marriage, the fruits of which 
are nowhere seen to better advantage | than in 
our American Holmes." \ 

[Then follows the poem, printed in Songs in Many 
Keys (1862), and in subsequent collections, under the 
title, " A Poem for the meeting of the American Medical 
Association, May 5, 1853."] 

Published by the Committee of Arrangements 
and Reception of the American Medical Asso- 
ciation. I Baker, Goodwin & Co., Printers, 1 
Spruce St., N. Y. 

Broadside; all of the above, including poem, 
printed on one large page. 



[ 132 ] 

POEMS OF THE CLASS OF 1829 

Songs | of the | Class of mdcccxxix. | Printed 
for the use of the Class only. | [Scroll] | Boston : 
— Prentiss and Sawyer, Printers, 1854. 
8vo, pp. 12, paper. 
Dr. Holmes's contributions are: — 
A Song of '29. Written for the Annual Meeting, 1851 , pp. 3-6. 
For the Class Meeting, Nov. 29, 1853. An Impromptu — Not 

Premeditated, p. 8. 
Questions and Answers. From Holmes's Poems, pp. 10-11. 
This little volume was printed during the winter of 
1853-54, in accordance with a vote of the Class, passed 
at the meeting of Nov. 29, 1853. 

Songs and Poems | of the | Class of | Eight- 
een Hundred and Twenty-Nine. | Second 
Edition. | Printed for the use of the Class only. | 
[Scroll] I Boston: | Prentiss, Sawyer, & Com- 
pany, Printers, | 19 Water Street. | 1859. 
8vo, pp. 46. Portrait of Dr. Holmes. 
Dr. Holmes's contributions are: — 
A Song of "Twenty-Nine." Written for the Annual Meeting, 

1851, pp. 3-6. 
An Impromptu — Not Premeditated. Written for the Class 

Meeting, Nov. 29, 1853, p. 10. 
The Dream [" The Old Man Dreams "]. Written for the 

Class Meeting, Nov., 1854, pp. 14-16. 
Song [" Remember — Forget "]. Written for the Class Meet- 
ing, Jan. 10, 1856, pp. 17-19. 
A Poem ["Our Indian Summer"]. Written for the Class 

Meeting, Nov., 1856, pp. 20-21. 
Mare Rubrum. Written for the Annual Meeting of the Class, 

1858, pp. 22-24. 
The Boys. Written for the Class Meeting, Jan. 6, 1859, pp. 

29-31. 
Questions and Answers. "From Holmes's Poems," pp. 45-46 
(Appendix). 



[ 133 ] 

Songs and Poems | of the | Class of | Eight- 
een Hundred and Twenty-Nine. | Third 
Edition. | Printed for the use of the Class only. | 
Boston: | Prentiss & Deland, Book and Job 
Printers, | No. 40, Congress Street. | 1868. 

8vo, pp. 117. Collation of front matter is 
as follows: p. 1, title; 2, blank, with border; 
3-5, list of members of the Class; 6, Class-Day 
officers; 7, present officers; 8, motto. 

The poems begin on p. 9, and include the following 
by Dr. Holmes: — 
A Song of **Twenty-Nme," pp. 9-12. 

Questions and Answers ("For the Class, 1852"), pp. 12-13. 
An Impromptu, pp. 16-17. 
The Dream,^ pp. 19-21. 
Song,^ pp. 21-23. 
Poem,^ pp. 24-25. 
Mare Rubrum, pp. 25-27. 
The Boys, pp. 31-33. 
Lines ["I'm ashamed — that's the fact," etc.]. Written for 

the Class Meeting, 1860, pp. 41-42. 
A Voice of the Loyal North. Written for the Class Meeting, 

Jan. 3, 1861, pp. 59-61. 
In Memory of J. D. R. Read at the Class Meeting, Jan. 23, 

1862, p. 63. 
Voyage of the Good Ship Union. Read at the Class Meeting, 

Jan., 1862, pp. 64-67. 
"Choose You this Day whom Ye will Serve." Read at the 

Class Meeting, Jan. 8, 1863, pp. 69-71. 
Our Classmate, F. W. C. Written for the Class Meeting, 

Jan. 7, 1864, pp. 73-75. 
The Last Charge. Read at the Class Meeting, Jan. 7, 1864, 

pp. 77-78. 
Our Oldest Friend. Read to "The Boys of '29," Jan. 5, 

1865, pp. 80-82. 
Sherman 's in Savannah! Written for the Class Meeting, 
Jan., 1865, p. 83. 

^ For the titles afterward given to these poems see Songs and Poems of 
the Class of 1829, edition of 1859, p. 132, sujyra. 



[134] 

My Annual. For the "Boys of '29." — At Annual Meeting, 

Jan. 4, 1866, pp. 84-86. 
All Here, 1829-1867. Written for the Class Meeting, Jan. 

10, 1867, pp. 90-92. 
Once More. Condiscipulis, Cooetaneis, Harvardianis, Amicis. 

Written for the Class Meeting, Jan., 1868, pp. 96-99. 
The Appendix, pp. 113-117, contains two extracts 
from the "Autocrat." 

The Class records state that this volume was printed 
** on tinted paper and entirely new type." 

Additional | Songs and Poems | of the | Class 
OF 1829. I 1868-1881. 

8vo, pp. 119-197. ''The paging of these 
' Additional Songs and Poems ' has been ar- 
ranged with a view to their being bound with 
the original volume " (p. 120). 
The following are Dr. Holmes's contributions: — 

Bill and Joe, pp. 121-123. 

Hymn, written for the Class, and sung at their meeting, Jan. 

6, 1869,^ p. 124. 
Lines, written for the Class Meeting, Jan. 6, 1869,^ pp. 125- 

128. 
Ad Sodales. Written for the Class Meeting, Jan. 6, 1870,^ pp. 

130-135. 
Lines written for the Class Meeting, Jan. 5, 1871,* pp. 137- 

140. 
Our Sweet Singer J. A. Written for the Class Meeting, 

Jan. 4, 1872, pp. 142-144. 
Lines written for the Class Meeting, Jan. 9, 1873. H. C. M. 

H. S. J. K. W., pp. 153-155. 
What I have come for. Written for the Class Meeting, Jan. 

9, 1873, pp. 155-156. 
Lines written for the Class, Jan. 8, 1874,^ pp. 155-156. 
Lines written for the Class Meeting, Jan. 7, 1875,^ pp. 160- 

161. 
1 "Hymn for the Class Meeting." ^ «xhe Old Cruiser." 

' "Even-Song." * "The Smiling Listener." 

5 "Our Banker." ^ "For Class Meeting." 



[135] 

"Ad Amicos," 1829-1876. For the Class Meeting, Jan. 6, 

1876, pp. 165-168. 
How not to Settle It. Read to the Class, Jan. 4, 1877, pp. 

168-173. 
The Last Survivor. Read at the Meeting of Jan. 10, 1878, 

pp. 176-180. 
A Dialogue, Senex — Juvenis.^ Read at the Class Meeting, 

Jan. 9, 1879, pp. 180-183. 
Vestigia Quinque Retrorsum. An Academic Poem. Read at 

the Commencement Dinner of the Alumni of Harvard 

University, June 25, 1879, by OHver Wendell Holmes; 

it being also the fiftieth anniversary of our class, pp. 186- 

192. 
The Shadovrs. Written for the Class Meeting, Jan. 8, 1880, 

pp. 192-194. 
Benjamin Peirce. Astronomer, Mathematician. Read at the 

Class Meeting, Jan. 6, 1881, pp. 196-197. 

It appears from the Class records that this volume 
was published in June, 1881. 

The Latest Poems | of the | Class of 1829. | 
1882-1889. 

Svo, pp. 199-232. The pagination continues 
that of the edition of 1881. 
Contains the following poems by Dr. Holmes : — 

Before the Curfew. Read at the Class Meeting, Jan. 5, 

1882, pp. 204-208. 

A Loving-Cup Song. Read at the Class Meeting, Jan. 4, 

1883, pp. 211-212. 

The Girdle of Friendship. Read at the Class Meeting, Jan. 

10, 1884, pp. 213-214. 
The Lyre of Anacreon. Read at the Class Meeting, Jan. 8, 

1885, pp. 217-219. 
The Old Tune. Thirty-Sixth Variation. Read at the Class 

Meeting, Jan. 7, 1886, pp. 219-220. 
The Broken Circle. Read at the Class Meeting, Jan. 6, 

1887, pp. 223-225. 

* Printed " with some changes" in the Atlantic Monthly for August, 1880, 
under the title "The Archbishop and Gil Bias." 



[136] 

The Angel-Thief. Read at the Class Meeting, Jan. 5, 

1888, pp. 2^5-2^6. 

After the Curfew. Read at the Class Meeting, Jan. 10, 

1889, pp. 227-229. 

Also an extract from Dr. Holmes's article in the Atlantic 
Monthly for Jan., 1890 (the first installment of "Over the 
Teacups"), pp. 229-232. 

The Class records do not disclose the date of publi- 
cation of this concluding volume of the poems written by 
its members for their annual meetings, but it was un- 
doubtedly published during the year 1890, as it contains 
an extract from the Atlantic for January of that year, 
and as the Rev. Mr. May's letter to the librarian of 
Harvard College, accompanying a copy, is dated January 
9, 1891. 

THE NEW EDEN 

The New Eden. | Read before the Berkshire 
Horticultural Society, at | Stockbridge, Sept. 
13, 1854. I By Oliver Wendell Holmes. 

Broadside, small 8vo, pp. 4; viz. : 1, title; 2-4, 
poem. 

Mr. J. E. A. Smith, in The Poet among the Hills, 
states that, after reading the poem. Dr. Holmes acceded 
to the request of a local editor who wished to print it, on 
condition that he should have as many proofs and make 
as many alterations as he chose, and should have a hun- 
dred copies of the poem printed by itself. He had sixteen 
proofs and doubled the length of the poem, besides giving 
it a more serious tone. 

THE PROMISE 

The Promise. A Poem written for Harriet 
Ryan's Fair, for a Home for Destitute and 
Incurable Women. March 20, 1859. Boston, 
1859. 



[ 13^ ] 

Leaflet, 8vo, pp. 4. Poem on p. 1, signed 
O. W. Holmes, March 20th, 1859; other pages 
blank. 

VIVE LA FRANCE 

The I Address of Mr. [Edward] Everett | and 
the I Poem of Dr. O. W. Holmes, | at the 
Dinner given to | H. I. H. Monseigneur | The 
Prince Napoleon, | September 25th, 1861. | 
Cambridge: | Privately Printed. | 1861. 

8vo, pp. i-iv, 5-20; viz.: i, title; ii, imprint 
(Riverside, Cambridge: Printed by H. O. 
Houghton); iii-iv, introductory note; 5-16, 
Mr. Everett's address; 17, half-title (Poem 
by O. W. Holmes); 18, blank; 19-£0, poem 
("Vive la France!"). 

SONGS IN MANY KEYS 

Songs in Many Keys. | By | Oliver Wendell 
Holmes. | Boston : Ticknor and Fields. \ 1862. | 
[c. 1861.] 

8vo, pp. X, 308. Page i, title; ii, copyright, and 
imprint (University Press, Cambridge : Stereo- 
typed and Printed by Welch, Bigelow & Co.) ; 
iii, dedication, "To the most indulgent of 
readers, the kindest of critics, my beloved mo- 
ther, all that is least unworthy of her in this 
volume is dedicated by her affectionate son;" 
iv, blank; v, verse, ^ beginning "The piping 

* In all collected editions of Dr. Holmes's poems the title "Songs in 
Many Keys" has been given to a group corresponding in the main to the 
contents of this volume, but varying slightly from time to time, and these 
lines are printed at the head of that group in every case. In the various 
issues of the Household Edition they have no separate title, but in the 
Riverside, Cambridge, and Cabinet Editions, they are entitled "Prologue." 



[138] 

of our slender, peaceful reeds;" vi, blank; 
vii-x, contents; 1-305, poems; 306, blank; 
307-308, note to "Agnes." 

A list of the poems follows; none of them had pre- 
viously appeared in any collection, with these exceptions r 
"The Ploughman," the "Poem for the Dedication of the 
Pittsfield Cemetery," and the lines "To an English 
Friend" were included in the London edition of 1852; 
and "Spring," "The Study," "The Bells," "Non-Re- 
sistance," "The Moral Bully," and "The Mind's Diet" 
are excerpts from "Astrsea," which was printed entire 
in that edition. 

Agnes. ^ 

The Ploughman. 

A Poem for the Dedication of the Pittsfield Cemetery. 

Pictures from Occasional Poems, 1850-1856. 

Spring. 

The Study. 

The Bells. 

Non-Resistance. 

The Moral Bully. 

The Mind's Diet. 

Our Limitations. 

The Old Player.2 

The Island Ruin. 

The Banker's Dinner. 

The Mysterious Illness. 

A Mother's Secret. 

The Disappointed Statesman. 

The Secret of the Stars. 
To Governor Swain. ^ 

To an English Friend. 
Vignettes. 

After a Lecture on Wordsworth. 

* In the poem as here printed (part ii, stanza 28), and in all subsequent 
reprintings except the Riverside, Cambridge, and Cabinet Editions, Agnes's 
surname is spelled Surraige; in those editions it is changed to Surriage, 
the form adopted by Mr. E. L. Bynner, in his romance. 

^ For the history of this and the six following poems, see supra, p. 20. 



[139] 

After a Lecture on Moore. 

After a Lecture on Keats. 

After a Lecture on Shelley. 

After a Course of Lectures. 

The Hudson. 
A Poem for the Meeting of the American Medical Association. 
The New Eden. 

A Sentiment ("A triple health to Friendship, Science, Art"). 
Semicentennial Celebration of the New England Society 

(Dec. 22, 1855). 
Ode for Washington's Birthday. 
Class of '29 (Nov. 6, 1856). 
For the Meeting of the Burns Club (1856). 
For the Burns Centennial Celebration (Jan. 25, 1859). 
Birthday of Daniel Webster (Jan. 18, 1856). 
Meeting of the Alumni of Harvard College (1857). 
The Parting Song (1857). 

Boston Common — Three Pictures, 1630, 1774, 186- (1859). 
Latter-Day Warnings. 
Prologue [from the "Autocrat"]. 
The Old Man of the Sea. 

Ode for a Social Meeting, with Slight Alterations by a Teeto- 
taler. 
The Deacon's Masterpiece: or the Wonderful "One-Hoss 

Shay." 
^Estivation. 
Contentment. 
Parson Turell's Legacy. 
De Sauty. 

The Old Man Dreams. 
Mare Rubrum. 
What we all Think. 
Spring has Come. 
A Good Time Going. 
The Last Blossom. 
"The Boys." 

The Opening of the Piano. 
Midsummer. 

A Parting Health. To J. L. Motley (1857). 
A Good-by. To J. R. Lowell (1855). 
At a Birthday Festival. To J. R. Lowell (Feb. 22, 1858). 



[ 140] 

A Birthday Tribute. To J. F. Clarke (April 4, 1860) . 

The Gray Chief (1859). 

The Last Look. W. W. Swain (Sept. 22, 1858). 

In Memory of Charles Wentworth Upham, Junior (1860). 

Martha (Died Jan. 7, 1861). 

Sun and Shadow. 

The Chambered Nautilus. 

The Two Armies. 

For the Meeting of the National Sanitary Association (1860). 

Musa. 

The Voiceless. 

The Crooked Footpath. 

The Two Streams. 

Robinson of Leyden. 

Saint Anthony the Reformer. 

Avis. 

L*is, her Book. 

Under the Violets. 

The Promise. 

The Living Temple. 

Hymn of Truth. 

A Sun-Day Hymn. 

A Voice of the Loyal North. National Fast, Jan. 4, 1861. 

Brother Jonathan's Lament for Sister Carohne. 

Under the Washington Elm, Cambridge (April 27, 1861). 

International Ode. Our Father's Land. Sung in unison by 

1200 children of the public schools, at the visit of the Prince 

of Wales to Boston, October 18, 1860. 
Freedom, our Queen. 
Army Hymn. 
Parting Hymn. 
The Flower of Liberty. 
The Sweet Little Man. 
Vive la France! Dinner to Prince Napoleon, Revere House, 

Sept. 25, 1861. 
Union and Liberty. 

It will be noticed that, while the poems scattered 
through the "Autocrat" and "Professor" are given a 
place in this volume, they are curiously intermingled 
and are not arranged according to any system which 



[ 141 ] 

one can readily grasp. At this time (1862) Dr. Holmes 
had long since acquired the habit of reading an annual 
poem to the Class of '29, but his contributions of 1851, 
1853, and 1855 are omitted from this collection. They 
had already been printed in the Songs of the Class, but 
so had "The Old Man Dreams" (1854), "Our Indian 
Summer" (1856), "Mare Rubrum" (1858), and "The 
Boys " (1859), which are included in this volume. 
Apparently reprinted several times. 

POEMS: BLUE AND GOLD EDITION 

The Poems | of | Oliver Wendell Holmes. | 
[Ornament] \ [Device] \ Boston: | Ticknor and 
Fields. I 1862. 

Blue and Gold Edition ; 32mo, pp. xii, 
410, followed by blank leaf, list of Blue and 
Gold books, another blank leaf, and a list 
of books published by Ticknor & Fields (16 
pages). Collation is as follows: Portrait (front- 
ispiece, facing title); i, title; ii, copyright, and 
imprint (University Press: Welch, Bigelow, 
and Company, Cambridge); iii-v, verse, "To 
my Readers," dated April 8, 1862; ^ vi, blank; 
vii-xi, contents; xii, blank; 1, half-title ("Po- 
etry: a Metrical Essay"); 2, blank; 3, dedica- 
tion of "Poetry;" 4, blank; 5-32, "Poetry;" 
33, half-title (Miscellaneous Poems); 34, blank; 
35-190, poems; 191, half-title (Songs in Many 
Keys); 192, blank; 193, dedication (to his 
mother); 194, blank; 195-402, poems; 403, 
half-title (Notes); 404, blank; 405-410, notes. 
Floriated initial letters throughout, and orna- 
ments on half-titles and dedication pages. 

' Printed in all subsequent collected editions as the opening poem. 



[142] 

This edition contains, in addition to all the poems in- 
cluded in the 2d issue of 1849, and in Songs in Many 
Keys, 1862, the "Voyage of the Good Ship Union," on 
pp. 398-401, before "Union and Liberty," which closes 
the volume. **The Cambridge Churchyard" and "Old 
Ironsides " were first printed as separate poems in this 
edition, which was reprinted many times. 

SONGS OF MANY SEASONS 
Songs of Many Seasons. | 1862-1874. | By | 
Oliver Wendell Holmes. | [Device] \ Boston: j 
James R. Osgood and Company, \ late Ticknor 
& Fields, and Fields, Osgood, & Co. | 1875. 
[c. 1874.] 

12mo, pp. xii, 216. Collation is as follows: 
i, title; ii, copyright, and imprint (University 
Press: Welch, Bigelow, & Co., Cambridge); 
iii-iv, verse, "Opening the Window;" iv-vii, 
verse, "Programme," dated Oct. 7, 1874; viii, 
blank; ix-xii, contents; 1-216, poems, divided 
into groups, as follows : — 

In the Quiet Days, pp. 1-40: 

An Old-Year Song, 1874. 

Bill and Joe, 1868. 

Dorothy Q. 1871. 
• The Organ-Blower, 1872. 

Homesick in Heaven,^ 1872. 

Fantasia. The Young Girl's Poem,^ 1872. 

Aunt Tabitha. The Young Girl's Poem,^ 1872. 

At the Pantomime, 18 — , rewritten 1874. 

After the Fire, 1872. 

A Ballad of the Boston Tea-Party, 1874. 

Epilogue to the Breakfast-Table Series, 1872.* 

Nearing the Snow-Line. 
In War Tdue, pp. 41-62: 

To Canaan. A Puritan War-Song, 1862. 

1 From " The Poet at the Breakfast-Table." 



[143]. 

Thus Saith the Lord, 1862. 
Choose You this Day, etc., 1863. 
Never or Now! An Appeal, 1862. 
The Last Charge, 1864. 
Our Country, 1865. 

Sherman's in Savannah! A Half -Rhymed Lnpromptu, 1865. 
God Save the Flag, 1865. 

Hymn — After the Emancipation Proclamation, 1865. 
Hymn for the Fair at Chicago, 1865. 
Songs of Welcome and Farewell, pp. 63-97: 

America to Russia. Read by Hon. G. V. Fox at a dinner 

given to the Mission from the United States, St. Petersburg, 

Aug. 5, 1866. 
Welcome to the Grand Duke Alexis, Music Hall, Dec. 9, 1871. 
At the Banquet to the Grand Duke Alexis, Dec. 9 [11], 1871. 
At the Banquet to the Chinese Embassy, Aug. 21, 1868. 
At the Banquet to the Japanese Embassy, Aug. 2, 1872. 
Bryant's Seventieth Birthday, Nov. 3, 1864. 
At a Dinner to General Grant, July 31, 1865. 
At a Dinner to Admiral Farragut, July 6, 1865. 
A Toast to Wilkie ColHns, Feb. 16, 1874. 
To H. W. Longfellow. Before his Departure for Europe, 

May 27, 1868. 
To Christian Gottfried Ehrenberg. For his Jubilseum at 

Berlin, Nov. 5, 1868. 
Memorial Verses, pp. 98-128: 

For the Services in Memory of Abraham Lincoln, June 1, 

1865. 
For the Commemoration Services, Cambridge, July 21, 1865. 
Edward Everett, Our First Citizen, Jan. 30, 1865. 
Shakespeare Tercentennial Celebration, April 23, 1864. 
In Memory of John and Robert Ware, May 25, 1864. 
Humboldt's Birthday. Centennial Celebration, Sept. 14, 1869. 
Poem at the Dedication of the Halleck Monument, July 8, 

1869. 
Hymn for the Celebration at the Laying of the Corner-Stone 

of Harvard Memorial Hall, Oct. 6, 1870. 
Hymn for the Dedication of Memorial Hall at Cambridge, 

June 23, 1874. 
Hymn at the Funeral Services of Charles Sumner, April 29, 

1874. 



[ 144] 

Rhymes of an Hour, pp. 129-166: 

Address for the Opening of the Fifth Avenue Theatre, New 

York, Dec. 3, 1873. 
Rip Van Winkle, M. D. An After-Diniier Prescription taken 

by the Massachusetts Medical Society, at their meeting 

held May 25, 1870. 
Chanson without Music. By the Professor Emeritus of Dead 

and Live Languages, 1867. 
For the Centennial Dinner of the Proprietors of Boston Pier, 

or the Long Wharf, April 16, 1873. 
A Poem Served to Order. Phi Beta Kappa, June 26, 1873. 
The Fountain of Youth. Read at the Meeting of the Harvard 

Alumni Association, June 25, 1873. 
A Hymn of Peace. Sung at the " Jubilee," June 15, 1869. 
For Meetings of the Class of 1829, pp. 167-216: 
Our Classmate F. W. C, 1864. 
Our Oldest Friend, 1865. 
My Annual, 1866. 
All Here, 1867. 
Once More, 1868. 
The Old Cruiser, 1869. 
Hymn for the Class-Meeting, 1869. 
Even-Song, 1870. 
The Smiling Listener, 1871. 
Our Sweet Singer, J. A., 1872. 
H. C. M., H. S., J. K W., 1873. 
What I have Come For, 1873. 
Our Banker, 1874. 

GRANDMOTHER'S STORY OF BUNKER HILL 
BATTLE 

[Private Copy.]^ Grandmother's Story of 
Bunker-Hill Battle | as she saw it from 
the Belfry. | By OHver Wendell Holmes. [1875.] 
Pamphlet, folio, pp. 10. Printed in veiy large 
type, on right-hand page only. Six copies 
printed. 

^ These brackets are in the original. 



[145] 

On the title-page of the copy in the Boston Public 
Library Dr. Holmes wrote, "for old eyes." 

Geandmother's Story of Bunker-Hill Bat- 
tle, by Oliver Wendell Holmes. Illustrated by 
H. W. McVickar. Imprinted at New York by 
Dodd^ Mead & Company by arrangement with 
Houghton, Mifflin & Co. [c. 1883.] 

Square 8vo, pp. 32. Illustrated in color; 
full-page cuts, and cut on each page of text. 

The Same. With Biography and Notes by Mar- 
garet Hill McCarter. Topeka, Kansas, Crane 
& Co., 1904, 

12mo, pp. 69. Contains a "guide to the 
study of Oliver Wendell Holmes." 

The earliest publication of this poem was in the copy- 
righted volume, Memorial — Bimker Hill, issued by James 
R. Osgood & Co., which contained also 12 pages of 
historical matter, written by James M. Bugbee, Esq. See 
p. 31, supra, note. 

A FAMILY RECORD 

A Family Record. Woodstock, Connecticut, 
July 4th, 1877. 

Pamphlet, 4to, pp. 11. Poem begins on page 
1, under above heading. Only very few copies 
printed. 

In the correspondence accompanpng the copy now 
in the Library of Harvard College, Dr. Holmes states 
that the pamphlet was printed for him at " Mr. Clapp's 
Printing Office." 

This poem was read at Roseland Park, Conn., during 
the annual celebration of Independence Day under the 
auspices of Dr. Bowen of the Independent. " The Ship 
of State " was read on the same occasion. 



[ 146 ] 

POEMS, HOUSEHOLD EDITION 

The I Poetical Works | of | Oliver Wendell 
Holmes. | Household Edition. | [Device] \ 
Boston: | Houghton, Osgood and Company, j 
The Riverside Press, Cambridge. | 1877. 

8vo, pp. xii, 322. The collation is as fol- 
lows: i, haK-title; ii, blank; iii, title; iv, copy- 
right; v-x, contents; xi, "To my Readers" 
[verse]; xii, blank; 1-320, poems; 321-322, 
notes. 

The Household was the first collected edition of Dr. 
Holmes's poems after the Blue and Gold Edition of 1862. 
It included all of those contained in the edition of 1836, 
except " A Souvenir," " The Dying Seneca," " The Last 
Prophecy of Cassandra," and "To my Companions;" 
all of the edition of 1849 ; all of the Songs in Many Keys ; 
" The Voyage of the Good Ship Union " (which was the 
only "uncollected " poem in the Blue and Gold Edition); 
all of the Songs of Many Seasons; and some additional 
poems, a Hst of which will be given a httle later. The 
contents of the volume were arranged thus : — 

Earlier Poems (1830-1836). 

This group contained eighteen of the Poems of 1836, "Poetry: 
a Metrical Essay," coming last. " Old Ironsides " and " The 
Cambridge Churchyard " are again printed separately. 

Additional Poems (1837-1848). 

This group contained twenty-one of the poems added in the 
edition of 1849, 2d issue. 

Miscellaneous Poems (1830, etc.). 

This group contained all the rest of the poems printed in 1836 
and 1849, except the four named above, and except also 
" Questions and Answers," which was here placed among the 
Poems of the Class of '29. 

* Written as an introduction to the Blue and Gold Edition. 



[147] 

Songs in Many Keys (1849-1861). 

This group was divided into 1, 1849-1856, and II, 1857-1861. 
The two divisions embraced the poems contained in the volume 
of this title, with the exception of most of those originally pub- 
lished in the " Autocrat " and "Professor," and those written 
for the Class of '29, which were printed in separate groups. 

Poems from the Autocrat of the Breakfast-Table 
(1857-1858). 

"The Living Temple" and "The Voiceless" were omitted 
from this group, for some unfathomable reason, and left in the 
second division of Songs in Many Keys; while "The Old Man 
Dreams" and "Mare Rubrum," which were originally written 
for meetings of .the Class of '29, were placed in that group. 
"Album Verses had not previously been collected. 

Poems from the Professor at the Breakfast-Table 
(1858-1859). 

"A Mother's Secret" was printed among the Pictures from 
Occasional Poems in the first division of Songs in Many Keys; 
"The Two Streams" and "At a Birthday Festival,"* in the 
second division of the same group; and "The Boys," among 
the Class poems. 

Poems from the Poet at the Breakfast-Table (1871- 
1872). 

" J[oseph] A[ngier] " was printed in the next following group 
under the title "Our Sweet Singer — J. A." "Wind-Clouds and 
Star-Drifts" here first collected. 

Poems of the Class of '29 (1851-1877). 

This group includes all the songs and poems found in the 
third edition of the Class pubHcation (1868), together with "Bill 
and Joe" (placed at the head of the group), and the following 
additional pieces: — 

The Old Cruiser (1869). 

Hymn for the Class-Meeting (1869). 

Even-Song (1870). 

The Smiling Listener (1871). 

Our Sweet Singer — J. A. (1872). 

H. C. M. H. S. J. K. W. (1873). 

What I have Come For (1873). 

Our Banker (1874). 



[ 148 ] 

For Class Meeting (1875). 

Ad Amicos (1876). 

How Not to Settle It (1877). 

Of these Class poems the following had not previously ap- 
peared in any collection of Dr. Holmes's works, except the 
privately printed Class publications: "A Song of '29," "An 
Impromptu — Not Premeditated , " " Remember — Forget , ' ' 
"For Class Meeting" (1875), "Ad Amicos" (1876), and "How 
Not to Settle It" (1877). 

Songs of Many Seasons (1862-1874). 

The poems contained in the volume of this title are here 
reprinted under the same subdivisions and in the same order, 
with these omissions: "Homesick in Heaven," "Fantasia," 
"Aunt Tabitha," and the "Epilogue to the Breakfast-Table 
Series," which are printed under the separate heading of " Poems 
from the Poet at the Breakfast-Table;" "Bill and Joe," " Choose 
You this Day," "The Last Charge," "Sherman's in Savannah," 
and the whole subdivision "For Meetings of the Class of '29," 
all of which appear in the preceding group. 

Additional Poems (to 1877). 

At a Meeting of Friends, August 29, 1859. 

A Farewell to Agassiz. 

A Sea Dialogue. 

At the "Atlantic Dinner," December 15, 1874. 

"Lucy." For her Golden Wedding, October 18, 1875. 

Hymn for the Inauguration of the Statue of Governor 

Andrew, at Hingham, October 7, 1875. 
A Memorial Tribute. 
Joseph Warren, M. D. 
Grandmother's Story of Bunker-Hill Battle. 
Old Cambridge, July 3, 1875. 
Welcome to the Nations, Philadelphia, July 4, 1876. 
A Familiar Letter. 
Unsatisfied. 

How the Old Horse Won the Bet. 
An Appeal for "the Old South.'* 
The First Fan. 
To R. B. H. 
"The Ship of State." 
A Family Record. 



[ 149] 

"A Farewell to Agassiz" and *'A Sea Dialogue" had pre- 
viously appeared in the Humorous Poems, 1865; none of the 
others had been printed in any collection. 

First Verses. PhilHps Academy, Andover, Mass., 1824 or 
1825. 

These verses (a translation from the ^Eneid Bk. I) fill the 
last page of the text (320). 

Reprinted without change in 1880. 

The Same. Household Edition. With Illustra- 
tions. Boston, 1878. 

The Same. Boston and New York, Houghton, 
Mifflin and Company, 1887. 

8vo, pp. xiv, 357; with frontispiece portrait, 
and 8 full-page cuts. The collation is as follows : 
i, blank; ii, panel advertisement of other books 
"by the same author;" iii, title; iv, copyright 
and imprint; v-x, contents; xi, list of illustra- 
tions; xii, blank; xiii, "To my Readers;" 
xiv, "From the first gleai^s of morning to the 
gray" (Prelude to Poems, Handy Volume 
Edition, 1881, since called "Rhymes of a Life- 
time"); 1-351, poems; 352, blank; 353-354, 
notes; 355-357, index of titles. 

Pages 1 to 320 are printed from the same plates as the 
earlier impressions of the Household; on pages 321 to 
351, under the group heading The Iron Gate, and Other 
Poems, are printed the contents of the volume of that 
title which was published in 1880, the order being un- 
changed. 

The Same. Boston and New York, Houghton, 
Mifflin & Co, [1895.] 

8vo, pp. xviii, 426. Collation of front matter 
is as follows: i, title; ii, copyright; iii. Pub- 



[ 150 ] 

Ushers' Note;* iv, blank; v-vi, Biographical 
Sketch; vii-xiv, contents; xv, list of illustra- 
tions; xvi, blank; xvii, "To my Readers;" 
xviii, "From the iSrst gleams of morning," etc. 

This edition is printed from the old plates to p. 351; 
pp. 352-409 contain, under the general heading Before 
the Curfew, and Other Poems, the poems printed in the 
volume of that title (1888), in the same order there 
adopted, together with others of later date; and pp. 410- 
416, a group of Poems from Over the Teacups. The 
notes are on pp. 417-418, and there are indexes of first 
lines (419-422), and titles (423-426). 

As the plates of the earlier impressions of the House- 
hold were used, it was impossible to adopt the more logi- 
cal arrangement followed in the Riverside Edition, and 
still further improved in the Cambridge Edition. 

Poems, Boston, James R, Osgood & Co.^ 1877. 
Library Edition. 

Substantially uniform with Household Edition. The 
compiler's knowledge of this edition is limited to a bare 
mention of it in an old catalogue. 

THE SCHOOL-BOY 

The School-Boy. | By | Oliver Wendell Holmes. | 
With Illustrations. | [Device] \ Boston: | Hough- 
ton, Osgood and Company. \ The Riverside Press, 
Cambridge. | 1879. 

8vo, pp. 79 (i-x, 11-79), with 28 full-page 

^ "When the Riverside Edition of Dr. Hohnes's complete works was 
issued about three years before his death, he took advantage of the oppor- 
tunity to decide finally what poems, printed up to that time, he wished to 
preserve. Later, the publishers added the few poems written after the 
author's selection was made, and a few other fugitive pieces which had 
then escaped his notice. The contents of the present Household Edition 
are substantially the same as those of the three volumes in the Riverside 
Edition devoted to poems, though the order of arrangement varies sUghtly." 



[ 151 ] 

and text cuts. Collation: i, blank; ii, frontis- 
piece; iii, title; iv, copyright [1878]; v, dedi- 
cation: "To the Students of Phillips Academy, 
Andover, Massachusetts. Read at the Centen- 
nial Celebration, June 6, 1878;" vi, blank; 
vii, ix, list of illustrations; viii, x, blank; 11, 
half-title; 12, blank; 13-79, poem, printed on 
right-hand pages only. 

Issued in England with imprint of G. Routledge & 
Sons. 

THE IRON GATE, AND OTHER POEMS 

The Iron Gate, | and Other Poems. | By | 
Oliver Wendell Holmes. [[Device] \ Boston: 
Houghton, Mifflin and Company, \ The River- 
side Press, Cambridge. | 1880. 

8vo, portrait, pp. 82. Collation: 1, title; 2, 
copyright, and imprint (Riverside, Cambridge: 
Stereotyped and Printed by H. O. Houghton 
and Company); 3, contents; 4, blank; 5-82, 
poems. 

Contents: — 
The Iron Gate. 

Vestigia Quinque Retrorsum. An Academic Poem, 1829-1879. 
My Aviary. 
On the Threshold. 
To George Peabody. 
At the Papyrus Club. 
For Whittier's Seventieth Birthday. 
Two Sonnets: Harvard. 
The Last Survivor. 
The Archbishop and Gil Bias. 
The Shadows. 
The Coming Era. 
In Response. 
For the Moore Centennial. 



[152] 

To James Freeman Clarke. 

Welcome to Chicago Commercial Club. 

American Academy Centennial Celebration. 

The School-Boy. 

The Silent Melody. 



POEMS, HANDY VOLUME EDITION 

The I Poetical Works | of | Oliver Wendell 
Holmes | Volume I [II] | [Device] \ Boston | 
Houghtoriy Mifflin and Company \ The River- 
side Press, Cambridge | 1881. 

32mo; vol. i, pp. xiv, 444; vol. ii, pp. viii, 
427. Collation of vol. i: i, title; ii, copyright 
and imprint; iii, "From the first gleam of 
morning to the gray" (sonnet, now called 
"Rhymes of a Lifetime"); iv, blank; v-vii, 
" To my Readers ; " viii, blank; ix-xiv, contents ; 
1-444, poems. Collation of vol. ii: i, title; ii, 
copyright and, imprint; iii-vii, contents; viii, 
blank; 1-413, poems; 414, blank; 415-418, 
notes; 419-427, index of first lines. Vol. ii has 
a frontispiece portrait. 

The contents are divided into the same groups as in 
the Household Edition, each group having a separate 
half-title, and the order of the poems is unchanged from 
that edition, except that "Vestigia Quinque Retrorsum," 
"The Last Survivor," "The Archbishop and Gil Bias," 
and " The Shadows " are taken from The Iron Gate col- 
lection and placed at the end of the Poems of the Class 
of '29. Under the heading The Iron Gate, and Other 
Poems," at the end of vol. ii, are printed the contents 
of the volume of that title, less the four poems named 
above, and plus these four, now first collected, viz.: 
"Boston to Florence," "Post-Prandial," "Our Home — 



[153] 

Our Country," and " Poem for the Centennial Anniver- 
sary Dinner of the Massachusetts Medical Society." 

Issued in England with imprint of Sampson Low & 
Co. 

The catalogue of the British Museum contains an 
entry of a "revised edition" of Dr. Holmes's "Poems," 
published by Routledge& Sons (pp. xii, 324), in 1881; 
and of liis " Poetical Works," published by the same firm 
in its "Excelsior Series," in 1883. 



THE LAST LEAF 

The Last Leaf | Poem | by | Oliver Wendell 
Holmes | Illustrated by | George Wharton Ed- 
wards & F. Hopkinson Smith | [Device] \ 
Houghton, Mifflin & Co. \ The Riverside 
Press, Cambridge, | m dccclxxxv. 

4to, decorated cloth, pp. 54, with decorative 
borders and many full-page plates. Rubricated 
title. Pp. 3-9 and 52-54 are right-hand pages; 
pp. 10-51 are printed on one side only, text on 
left-hand page, cut on right-hand. Pp. 3-5, 
list of illustrations. On pp. 6-8 is a facsimile 
of a manuscript copy of the poem; on pp. 52- 
54^, "The History of this Poem," by Dr. 
Holmes, dated Beverly Farms, July 9, 1885. 

In the " history " Dr. Holmes says : " Just when it was 
written I cannot exactly say, nor in what paper or peri- 
odical it was first published. It must have been written 
before April, 1833; probably in 1831 or 1832. It was 
republished in the first edition of my poems, in the 
year 1836." The fact is that the poem was first published 
in the Amateur for March 26, 1831, no. 17. See p. 205, 
infra. 



[154] 

The " history " is given almost in full in the Cambridge 
Edition, 1895, pp. 4-5. The false rhyme in the 3d stanza, 
there referred to, was corrected in 1836, " sad and wan " 
being substituted for "so forlorn," in the 3d Kne. 

The Same. Boston; Houghton, Mifflin & Co,, 
1894. 

8vo, pp. 55, with the decorative borders and 
illustrations of the quarto edition reproduced 
in smaller format. 

Issued in England, with imprint of Sampson Low & 
Co. 

The two editions correspond exactly, page for page, 
except in these respects : between the title-page and list 
of illustrations is a two-page letter from Dr. Holmes to 
the publishers, in facsimile, dated Beverly Farms, July 12, 
1894 ; ^ on pp. 6-8, the poem is printed in ordinary type ; 
the text and illustrations are printed on alternate right- 
hand pages; and the "history of the poem," at the end, 
fills four pages, 52-55. 

Dr. Holmes's letter is printed in the Cambridge Edition, p. 5. 
It reads thus: "I have read the proof you sent me and find 
nothing in it which I feel called upon to alter or explain. 

*'I have lasted long enough to serve as an illustration of my 
own poem. I am one of the very last of the leaves which still 
cling to the hough of life that budded in the spring of the nine- 
teenth century. The days of my years are threescore and 
twenty, and I am almost halfway up the steep incline which 
leads me toward the base of the new century so near to which 
I have already climbed. 

"I am pleased to find that this poem, carrying with it the 
marks of having been written in the jocund morning of life, is 
still read and cared for. It was with a smile on my lips that I 
wrote it; I cannot read it without a sigh of tender remem- 
brance. I hope it will not sadden my older readers, while it may 
amuse some of the younger ones to whom its experiences are as 
yet only floating fancies.'* 

1 Dr. Holmes died in October, 1894. 



[155] 

TRANSLATION 

La Derniere Feuille. Traduit du texte amer- 
icain par B. H. Gausseron. Paris, Quantin, 
1889. 

4to. Illustrated by F. H. Smith and G. W. 
Edwards. 

This French version of " The Last Leaf " is printed by 
Mr. Morse in the Life and Letters, vol. ii, pp. 98-100. 

POEMS, FAMILY EDITION 

Poems, Family Edition. Boston, Houghton, Mif- 
flin & Co., 1887. 

BEFORE THE CURFEW, AND OTHER POEMS 

Before the Curfew | and Other Poems | 
Chiefly | Occasional | by | Oliver Wendell 
Holmes | [Device] \ Boston and New York | 
Houghton, Mifflin and Company | The River- 
side Press, Cambridge | 1888. 

16mo, pp. vi, 110. Collation: i, title; ii, 
copyright and imprint; iii, "At my Fireside" 
(verse), dated March 1, 1888; iv, blank; v-vi, 
contents; 1-110, poems. 

Contents : — 

Before the Curfew, 1829-1882. 

A Loving-Cup Song, 1829-1883. 

The Girdle of Friendship, 1829-1884. 

The Lyre of Anacreon, 1829-1885. 

The Old Tune, Thirty-sixth Variation, 1829-1886. 

The Broken Circle, 1829-1887. 

The Angel-Thief, 1829-1888. 

At the Saturday Club. 

Benjamin Peirce: Astronomer, Mathematician, 1829-1880. 

Our Dead Singer. H. W. L. 



[156] 

To James Freeman Clarke, April 4, 1880. 
Two Poems to Harriet Beecher Stowe on her Seventieth 
Birthday, June 14, 1882. 

I. At the Summit. 

II. The World's Homage. 

A Welcome to Dr. Benjamin Apthorp Gould. 

To Frederick Henry Hedge. 

To James Russell Lowell. 

To John Greenleaf Whittier, on his Eightieth Birthday, 1887. 

Prelude to a Volume printed in Raised Letters for the Blind. 

Boston to Florence. 

At the Unitarian Festival, March 8, 1882. 

Poem for the 250th Anniversary of Harvard College. 

Of these poems, two — "To James Freeman Clarke'* and 
"Boston to Florence " — had already appeared in collected edi- 
tions, — the former in The Iron Gate, and Other Poems, and 
in the revised Household Edition of 1887, — and both in the 
Handy Volume Edition, 1881. 

Issued in England with imprint of Sampson Low & Co. 

POEMS, RIVERSIDE EDITION 

The Poetical Works | of | Oliver Wendell 
Holmes. | In Three Volumes | Volume I [II] 
[III] I [Device] \ Boston and New York | 
Houghton, Mifflin and Company \ The River- 
side Press, Cambridge | mdcccxcl 

Crown 8vo; pp. x, 287; x, 307; viii, 294. 
Portrait in vol. i. Pp. ix-x of vol. i: "To my 
Readers." 

The rearrangement of the poems which was made, 
under Dr. Holmes's supervision, for this edition, was 
sadly needed; there had been no collected edition ap- 
proaching completeness except the Household and the 
Handy Volume, and the successive reissues of the House- 
hold had been made by simply adding new plates for 
such poems as had been published since the last pre- 
ceding issue. Thus, for instance, some of the Poems of 



[157] 

the Class of '29 were printed under that heading, some 
under Songs of Many Seasons, some under Before the 
Curfew, and Other Poems, some under The Iron Gate, 
and Other Poems ; while some other unclassified poems 
were unaccountably omitted altogether. 

In the Riverside the following new categories were 
made up, viz. : Medical Poems, and Readings over the 
Teacups; while the Miscellaneous Poems (1830, etc.) of 
the Household, including those of his earlier productions 
to which Dr. Holmes was least partial, were placed at the 
end of the third volume, under the heading. Verses from 
the Oldest Portfolio. 

In making up this edition some poems were accident- 
ally omitted, and the omission is noted in each case in 
the first part of this bibliography. 

POEMS, EDINBURGH, 1892 

Poetical Works of Oliver Wendell Holmes. 
Edinburgh, David Douglas, 1892. 
4 vols., 12mo. 

' THE ONE-HOSS SHAY, etc. 

The One-Hoss Shay | With its Companion 
Poems I How the Old Horse Won the Bet | & | 
The Broomstick Train | by Oliver Wendell 
Holmes | with Illustrations by | Howard Pyle | 
[Device] \ Boston and New^ York | Houghton, 
Mifflin and Company \ The Riverside Press, 
Cambridge | m dccc xcii. 

8vo, pp. 80; rubricated title-page, frontis- 
piece, head- and tail-pieces, and about sixty 
full-page and text cuts. Preface by the author, 
dated July, 1891. 
Printed on right-hand page only. 



[158] 

The Same. Christmas Edition. 
With colored illustrations. 

The Same. Boston and New York, Houghton, 
Mifflin & Co., 1905. 
Reprinted from new plates, with illustrations in colors. 

DOROTHY Q 

Dorothy Q [red ] | Together with | A Ballad of 
the Boston Tea Party | & | Grandmother's 
Story of Bunker Hill Battle | By Oliver Wendell 
Holmes [red] \ with Illustrations by | Howard 
Pyle I [Device] \ Boston and New York | Hough- 
ton, Mifflin and Company \ The Riverside Press, 
Cambridge | m dccc xcii. 

12mo, pp. 131. Half-titles for each of the 
three poems; many full-page cuts, borders, 
vignettes, etc. 

250 copies printed on large paper. Issued in England 
T\4tli imprint of Gay and Bird. 

POEMS, CAMBRIDGE EDITION 

The Complete | Poetical Works of | Oliver 
Wendell Holmes | Cambridge Edition | [Cut 
of the " Gamhr el-Roofed House,"" Cambridge] \ 
Boston and New York | Houghton, Mifflin 
and Company \ The Riverside Press, Cam- 
bridge. [1895.] 

8vo, pp. xxii, 352; engraved title-page; 
portrait. Collation: i, title; ii, copyright; iii, 
Publishers' Note; iv, blank; v-ix, contents; 
X, blank; xi-xxi, Biographical Sketch, by 
H. E. S[cudder]; xxii, blank; 1-2, "To my 



[159] 

Readers ; " 3-320, poems; 321-344, appendix; 
345-348, index of first lines; 349-352, index 
of titles. 

Issued in England with imprint of Sampson Low & Co. 

The arrangement of the poems follows in the main 
that adopted in the Riverside Edition; but the poems 
printed at the end of the third volume of that edition are 
here relegated to the Appendix, and printed in smaller 
type, together with four poems, which had been omitted 
altogether in both Riverside and Household Editions, 
namely: "A Souvenir," "The Dying Seneca," "The 
Last Prophecy of Cassandra," and "To my Compan- 
ions." The Appendix also contains (pp. 333-337) the 
long poem, "Astrsea," except those portions which have 
always been printed under separate titles (see p. 129). 
Also (pp. 337-341) Notes and Addenda, the latter cate- 
gory including the Report of the Committee on the 
Ploughing Match (at the Anniversary of the Berkshire 
Agricultural Society, 1849), and a list of the Members 
of the Class of '29. Also a Chronological List of Dr. 
Holmes's poems, in which, "whenever the first appear- 
ance of a poem has been not precisely determined, the 
title is printed in italic under the year when the volume 
first including it was published." 

In this edition are collected for the first time : (1) a num- 
ber of poems which, for some reason not explained, were 
omitted from all previous issues of the Household as well 
as from the Riverside Edition, — " An Impromptu at 
the Walcker Dinner," etc. (1863), "Hymn for the Great 
Central Fair in Philadelphia" (1864), "Harvard" (1880), 
*' Youth" (1882), "Poem read at the Dinner given to the 
Author by the Medical Profession of New York City" 
(1883),^ and "But One Talent" (1890); (2) those poems 
which were written after the publication of the Riverside 
Edition, — " In Memory of John Grccnleaf Whittier," 
* Added to the group of Medical Poems. 



[160] 

" To the Teachers of America," *' Hymn for the 25th 
Anniversary of the Reorganization of the Boston Y. M. 
C. U.," and "Francis Parkman;" and (3) a hitherto 
neglected bit from the" Autocrat," namely, the "Prelude " 
to "Parson Turell's Legacy," which, it will be remem- 
bered, was the only part of that poem which the Pro- 
fessor was allowed to read. 

POEMS, CABINET EDITION 

Complete Poetical Works. Cabinet Edition. 
Boston and New York, Houghton, Mifflin & 
Co,, 1899. 

16mo, pp. xii, 453; portrait. 

This edition contains everything that is included in 
the Cambridge Edition, except the head-notes and the 
last two divisions of the Appendix, namely, the Notes 
and Addenda, and the Chronological List. 

POEMS, LIBRARY EDITION 

The Complete | Poetical Works | of | Oliver 
Wendell Holmes | Library Edition | Illus- 
trated with Photogravures | [Device] \ Boston 
and New York | Houghton, Mifflin & Com- 
pany I The Riverside Press, Cambridge | 

MDCCCC. 

Printed from plates of the Household Edition, with 
additional half-titles (disregarded in pagination) before 
most of the groups of poems, and before the Notes and 
the Index. On the verso of each of the half-titles, with 
two exceptions, is a small cut. On page 88 (blank in the 
Household Edition) is the dedication of Songs in Many 
Keys, originally printed in the volume of that name. 



[161] 

II 
PROSE 

BOYLSTON PRIZE DISSERTATIONS 

BoYLSTON I Prize Dissertations | for the 
Years 1836 and 1837. | By Oliver Wendell 
Holmes, M. D., | Fellow of the Massachu- 
setts Medical Society, and Member of the | 
Societe Medicale d'Observation of Paris. | Bos- 
ton: I Charles (7. Little and James Brown, \ 

M. DCCC. XXXVIII. 

8vo, pp. xvi, 371; map. On p. v is the dedi- 
cation: "To P. Cha. A. Louis, Doctor in Medi- 
cine of the Faculties of Paris and St. Petersburg, 
President of the Societe Medicale d' Observa- 
tion, etc., in the Recollection of his invaluable 
instruction and unvarying kindness. These 
Essays are respectfully inscribed." Pp. vii-ix, 
preface; xi-xiv [analytical] table of contents; 
1-132, Facts and Traditions respecting the 
Existence of Indigenous Intermittent Fever in 
New England. Perseverando, 133-243, On the 
Nature and Treatment of Neuralgia. "Read 
not to contradict and confute, nor to believe 
and take for granted, nor to find talk and dis- 
course, but to weigh and consider." 245-371, 
On the Utility and Importance of Direct Ex- 
ploration in Medical Practice. Inter lahores et 
taedia. 

Each dissertation has its own half-title. 



1. 16^ ] 
IIOM(EOPATHY,AND ITS KINDRED DELUSIONS 

Homoeopathy, | and its Kindred Delusions: | 
Two Lectures | delivered before the Boston 
Society for the | Diffusion of Useful Know- 
ledge. I By Oliver Wendell Holmes, M. D. | 
KOLTTvov (TKLois ovap. \ Bostou : I William D. Tick- 
nor, I 1842. 

Pamphlet, 12mo, pp. viii, 72. Preface on 
pp. iii-v, with 3 lines of errata at foot of p. v. 
First Lecture, pp. 1-27; Second Lecture, pp. 
28-72. No headlines. 

THE CONTAGIOUSNESS OF PUERPERAL FEVER 

The I Contagiousness | of Puerperal Fever | 
by Oliver W. Holmes, M. D. | Read before 
the Society for Medical Improvement, and pub- 
lished at the Request of the Society. [1843.] 
Pamphlet, 8vo, pp. 28. 

Reprinted from the New England Quarterly Journal 
of Medicine and Surgery, April, 1843, vol. 1, pp. 503-530. 

Puerperal Fever, | as a | Private Pesti- 
lence. I By I Oliver Wendell Holmes, M. D. | 
Parkman Professor of Anatomy and Physio- 
logy at Harvard University. | Boston : | Ticknor 
and Fields, \ m dccc lv. 

Pamphlet, 8vo, pp. 60. On p. 3 is the dedi- 
cation: "To the Medical Students and Gradu- 
ates of Harvard University;" p. 4, *'The Point 
at Issue;" pp. 5-24, introduction; pp. 25-60, 
"The Contagiousness of Puerperal Fever" 
(April, 1843). 



k 



[ 163] 

THE POSITION AND PROSPECTS OF THE 
MEDICAL STUDENT 

The I Position and Prospects | of | the 
Medical Student. | An Address | delivered 
before the | Boylston Medical Society of 
Harvard University, | January 12, 1844, | by 
Oliver W. Holmes, M. D. | Published at the 
request of the Society. | Boston : | John Putnam, 
Printer | 1844. 

Pamphlet, 8vo, pp. 28, including title. 

REPORT OF THE COMMITTEE ON MEDICAL 
LITERATURE 

Report of the Committee on Medical Lit- 
erature. (Extracted from the Transactions of 
the American Medical Association, vol. i.) 
[1847.] 

Pamphlet, 8vo, pp. 40; slip attached with list 
of errata. 

The report is signed (p. 40) by Dr. Holmes, Enoch 
Hale, G. C. Shattuck, Jr., D. Drake, John Bell, Austin 
Flint, and W. Selden. 

INTRODUCTORY LECTURE, 1847 

An I Introductory Lecture, | delivered at the | 
Massachusetts Medical College, | November 3, 
1847. I By Oliver Wendell Holmes, M. D. | 
Parkman Professor of Anatomy and Physio- 
logy. I {Device] \ Boston: | William D. Ticknor 
& Company, \ corner of Washington and School 
Streets. | m dccc xlvii. 

Pamphlet, 8vo, pp. 38, with 1 blank leaf at 



[ 164 ] 

end. Collation: 1, title; 2, copyright, and im- 
print (Printed by I. R. Butts, 2 School Street, 
Boston) ; 3, correspondence relative to printing 
the lecture; 4, blank; 5-38, lecture. 

On the outside of the back cover is an advertisement 
of "medical books published by William D. Ticknor & 
Co., Medical Booksellers." 

THE BENEFACTORS OF THE MEDICAL SCHOOL 

The I Benefactors | of the | Medical School 
OF Harvard University; | with a Biographical 
Sketch I of the | Late Dr. George Parkman. | 
An I Introductory Lecture, | delivered at the | 
Massachusetts Medical College, | November 7, 
1850, I by I Oliver Wendell Holmes, M. D. | 
Parkman Professor of Anatomy and Physio- 
logy. I Boston: | Ticknor, Reed, and Fields. I 

MDCCCL. 

Pamphlet, 8vo, pp. 38, viz.: 1, title; 2, copy- 
right and imprint; 3, correspondence with 
regard to printing the lecture; 4, blank; 5-37, 
lecture; 38, blank. 

ORATION BEFORE THE NEW ENGLAND 
SOCIETY 

Oration | delivered before the New Eng- 
land Society, | in the City of New York, | 
by Oliver Wendell Holmes, M. D., | at their 
Semi-centennial Anniversary, | December 22, 
1855. [1856.] 

Pamphlet, 8vo, pp. 48, including cover. 



[ 165 ] 

VALEDICTORY ADDRESS, 1858 

Valedictory Address, | delivered to the | Medi- 
cal Graduates of Harvard University, | at the | 
Annual Commencement, | Wednesday, March 
10, 1858. I By Oliver Wendell Holmes, M. D. | 
Parkman Professor of Anatomy and Physio- 
logy. I Re-printed from "The Boston Medical 
and Surgical Journal." | Boston: | David Clapp 
. . . 184 Washington Street. ] Medical and 
Surgical Journal Office. | 1858. 

Pamphlet, 8vo, pp. 15, including title. 

THE AUTOCRAT OF THE BREAKFAST- 
TABLE 

[For other editions see Appendix, pp. 312, 313, infra.] 

The Autocrat [red] \ of the | Breakfast- 
Table, [red] I Every man his own Boswell. 
I Boston: | Phillips, Sampson and Company, 
[red] I M Dccc lviii. 

Crown 8vo, pp. viii, 373, 4 of advertisements 
(1 each at front and back and on inside of each 
cover), 4 blank pages in front and 5 at back. 
Plates; engraved title (not included in pagina- 
tion) between the half-title and the title tran- 
scribed above. Collation: i, half-title; ii, blank; 
iii, title; iv, copyright, and imprint (Riverside, 
Cambridge: Stereotyped and Printed by H. O. 
Houghton and Company); v-viii, "The Auto- 
crat's Autobiography," dated Nov. 1, 1858; 
1-364, text; 365-373, index. 

Motto on title printed in small type. Other copies of 
the same date have no engraved title, and are probably 



[ 166 ] 

of a later issue. Another impression from the same plates 
was made in 1859. Of this issue some copies were 
printed on large paper, but none of the first issue are 
known to have been so printed. In later impressions the 
imprint was omitted from the copyright page, and the 
motto on the title-page printed in small capitals. 

The original manuscript of the " Autocrat " is in the 
collection of J. P. Morgan, Esq. 

The Same. By Oliver Wendell Holmes, Author 
of "Astrsea" and other Poems. [Motto ^] Edin- 
burgh, Alexander Strahan & Co,; London, 
Hamilton, Adams & Co., 1859. 
8vo, pp. 302. 

The Same. London, Alexander Strahan, 148 
Strand; Sampson Low, Son, & Marston, Lud- 
gate Hill, 1865. 
8vo, pp. 200. 

The Same. Boston, Ticknor and Fields, 1865. 
32mo, pp. vi, 395; portrait. Pp. iii-vi, "The 
Autocrat's Autobiography;" pp. 381-395, in- 
dex, with separate half-title. 
Blue and Gold Edition. 

The Same. With illustrations by J. G. Thomson. 
London, Alexander Strahan, 56 Ludgate Hill, 
1865. 

8vo, pp. xii, 329. 

The Same. With an Introduction by George 
A. Sala. London, Chatto and Windus, 1875. 

^ " Aqui esta encarrada el alma del licenciado Pedro Garcias." 

Gil Bias. 



[ 167 ] 

24mo, pp. iii-vi, 9-235, and 32 of advertise- 
ments at end. Introduction on pp. v-vi. 

Dr. Holmes's preface and "The Autocrat's Autobio- 
graphy" are omitted. 

The Same. New and Revised Edition, with il- 
lustrative notes. Boston, Houghton^ Mifflin 
& Co., 1883. 

8vo, pp. X, 321; portrait, opposite title; 
copyright, 1858 and 1882. On pp. iii-v is a 
new preface: "To the Readers of the Auto- 
crat of the Breakfast-Table," dated Beverly 
Farms, Aug. 29, 1882; pp. vii-ix, "The Auto- 
crat's Autobiography;" x, blank. 
The "illustrative notes" are foot-notes. * 

The Same. Author's Edition, Edinburgh, David 
Douglas, 1883. 

2 vols., 12mo; vol. i, pp. 212; vol. ii, pp. 256. 

This edition contains, besides the " new preface " of 

this year (" To the Readers of the Autocrat") and " The 

Autocrat's Autobiography," " An After-Breakfast Talk," 

printed in the Atlantic Monthly for January, 1883. 

The Same. Stereotyped and printed, with the 
permission of the author, by the American 
Printing House for the Blind [Louisville, Ky.], 
1885. 

2 vols., 4to; printed in raised letters on one 
side of the leaf. Vol. i, pp. 1-144; vol. ii, pp. 
145-261; including title in each case. 

The Same. By Oliver Wendell Holmes, Author 
of ** The Professor at the Breakfast-Table,^ and 
"The Poet at the Breakfast-Table." London, 

* Quotation marks omitted here. 



[168] 

Walter Scott, 24, Warwick Lane. Toronto, 
W. J. Gage & Co. [1889.] 

12mo, pp. viii, 271, and 8 of advertisements. 
"The Autocrat's Autobiography" on pp. v-vii. 
Camelot Series, vol. 44. 

The Same. Boston, Houghton, Mifflin & Co. 
[c. 1889.] 

2 vols., 16mo; vol. i, pp. x, 1-203 (half-title 
omitted in pagination) ; vol. ii, pp. iv, 205-442. 
Title-pages set in Old English type, within 
decorative borders. In vol. i, the preface of 
1882, "To the Readers," etc., occupies pp. 
iii-vi, and the "Autobiography," pp. vii-x. In 
vol. ii, the index occupies pp. 433-442. 

Birthday Edition. Printed from new plates. The " Pro- 
fessor," the "Poet," and "Over the Teacups" were 
published in the same style, the whole under the title of 
" The Breakfast-Table Series." About 300 copies were 
bound uncut, with paper labels. 

The Same. Boston, Houghton, Mifflin & Co., 
1891. 

Crown 8vo, pp. x, 321; portrait; preface to 
the new edition, dated Beverly Farms, July 28, 
1891, pp. viii-ix. 

Riverside Edition, vol. i, printed from plates of the 
edition of 1883. 

The Same. Boston and New York, Houghton, 
Mifflin & Co., 1892. 

8vo, pp. xiv, 321; portrait and many illus- 
trations; list of illustrations, p. xiii. 

Vol. i of the Standard Library Edition; printed from 
the same plates as the Riverside Edition. 



[169] 

The Same. The Autocrat [red] \ of the Break- 
fast-Table I by Oliver Wendell Holmes [red] \ 
with Illustrations by | Howard Pyle | I [n][red] | 
[Device] \ Boston and New York | Houghton, 
Mifflin and Company \ The Riverside Press, 
Cambridge | m dccc xciii. 

2 vols., 8vo; pp. xvi, 218; vi, 219-474; the 
pagination is continued through the two vol- 
umes. Illustrated with photogravures, head- 
and tail-pieces and numerous cuts. Collation of 
vol. i: v-vi, list of illustrations; vii-x, preface 
of 1882; x-xii, preface of 1891; xiii-xvi, "The 
Autocrat's Autobiography." 

Holiday Edition; printed from new plates. Issued in 
England with imprint of Gay and Bird. 

The Same. Boston, Houghton, Mifflin & Co,, 
1895. 

Riverside Literature Series, no. 81. Printed from the 
same plates as the Riverside Edition. 

The Same. Boston, New York, and Chicago, 
Houghton, Mifflin & Co., 1896. 

12mo; portrait. Printed from the plates of 
the Riverside Edition, with new title-pages and 
notes. Panel advertisement of Dr. Holmes's 
works preceding frontispiece, and 32 pp. of 
advertisements at end. 
Riverside School Library. 

The Same. Boston and New York, Houghton, 
Mifflin & Co,, 1898. 
Crown 8vo; portrait. 

Cambridge Classics. Printed from the same plates as 
the Riverside Edition. 



[170] 

The Same. "Reprinted from the original edition." 
Chicago, W, B. Conhey Co,, 1900. 
16mo, pp. 341. 

The Same. With an Introduction by Richard 
Burton. New York, Thomas F. Crowell & Co., 
1900. 

16mo, pp. 329. Rubricated half-title, with 
device. 

The Same. Boston, Houghton, Mifflin & Co., 
1902. 
16mo. 
Handy Volume Edition. Printed from the plates of the 
Birthday Edition. The "new preface" written for the 
Riverside Edition is omitted. 

The Same. With illustrations by H. M. Brock. 
London, J. M. Dent & Co., 1902. 

12mo, pp. xxii, 318; frontispiece and many 
full-page and text cuts. Title-page in blue and 
brown, inclosed in an ornamental design in 
brown; device in centre is a tea-set in blue. 

An American edition of 500 copies was made from 
the same plates, bearing the imprint of Houghton, 
Mifflin & Co., in addition to that of Dent. It also has a 
copyright page (vi), which is not in the English copies. 

Reissued in London and Boston in 1906; in this issue 
the title is printed on the title-page, "Autocrat at the 
Breakfast-Table." 

The Same. With an Introduction by Gilbert 
K. Chesterton. London, Blackie & Son, U. 
[1904.] 

16mo, pp. X, 390; portrait; title set in orna- 
mental border; running heads printed in red 



[171] 

throughout. Introduction, pp. iii-x; "The 
Autocrat's Autobiography/' pp. 1-4; Notes; 
prepared by E. H. Blakeney, M. A., Trinity 
College, Cambridge, pp. 349-390. 

TRANSLATION 

Der Tisch-Despot. Von Oliver Wendell Holmes. 
Deutsch von L. Abenheim. Stuttgart, Verlag 
von Aug, Berth, Auerhach. 
12mo, pp. 431. 

The translation is preceded by an unsigned poem. 
There is no indication of the date of publication. 

THE PROFESSOR AT THE BREAKFAST- 
TABLE 

The Professor | at the | Breakfast-Table; | 
with the I Story of Iris. | By Oliver Wendell 
Holmes, | Author of "The Autocrat of the 
Breakfast-Table." | Boston: | Ticknor and 
Fields. I M Dccc lx. [c. 1859.] 

12mo, pp. iv, 410; index, pp. 405-410. 
Some copies were printed on large paper, but such 
copies are very rare. 

The Same. London, Sampson Low, Son, & Co., 
1860. 

8vo, pp. 286. 

The Same. London, John Camden Hotten. 
12mo, pp. 252. 

The only indication of the date is an advertisement of 
new books for 1872 at the back of the volume. 

The Story of Iris. | By | Oliver Wendell 
Holmes. | Boston : | James R. Osgood and Com- 



[ 172] 

pan?/, I late Ticknor & Fields, and Fields, Os- 
good & Co. I 1877. 

32mo, pp. 108, and 4 of advertisements ; also 
advertisements on inside of both covers and on 
leaves facing them. 

The I Professor | at | the Breakfast-Table ; | 
with I The Storj^ of Iris. | [Device] \ Boston: | 
Houghton, Osgood and Covipany. \ The River- 
side Press, Cambridge. | 1880. 

8vo, pp. ii, 410. Panel advertisement oppo- 
site title; index, pp. 405-410. 

Printed from plates of the first edition. 

The Professor at the Breakfast-Table. 
Boston, Houghton, Mifflin & Co., 1888. 

12mo, pp. viii, 332. Preface to new edition, 
dated Nov., 1882, pp. v-vii; index, pp. 321- 
332. 

The Same. Author's Edition. Edinhurgh, David 
Douglas, 1883. 

2 vols., 12mo, pp. 260 and 227. 
Uniform with the "Autocrat" and "Poet." 
The same publisher also issued in this year an edition 
in one volume, 8vo, pp. vi, 410. 

The Professor at the Breakfast-Table 
with the Story of Iris. Authorized Edition. 
Bemhard Tauchnitz, 1883. 
Leipzig, 12mo, pp. 336. 

Selections from | The Professor | at the | Break- 
fast-Table. I By I Oliver Wendell Holmes, | 
Author of "The Autocrat of the Breakfast- 
table." I Stereotyped and Printed | by the | 



[173] 

American Printing House | fol* the Blind. | 
^ Louisville, Kentucky. | 1884. 

Quarto of 156 leaves, printed in raised letters 
on one side only; pp. 1-78 are printed on alter- 
nate right-hand pages; pp. 79-156 are printed 
on the intervening pages turned the other way. 

The Professor at the Breakfast-Table. 
London, Walter Scott, 1889. 
12mo. 

Camelot Series. Uniform with ''Autocrat " and " Poet." 

The Same. Boston, Houghton, Mifflin & Co., 
1890. 

2 vols., crown 8vo; pagination continued 
through the two volumes. Title-pages set in 
Old English type, within decorative borders. 

Birthday Edition; uniform with the "Autocrat" and 
the other volumes of the "Breakfast-Table Series." 
About 300 copies were bound uncut with paper labels. 

The Professor | at | the Breakfast-Table | 
with The Story of Iris | by | Oliver Wendell 
Holmes | [Device] \ Boston and New York | 
Houghton, Mifflin and Company \ The River- 
side Press, Cambridge | m dcccc xci. 

8vo, pp. X, 332. Collation is as follows: i, 
half-title; ii, blank; iii, title; iv, copyright; v-vii, 
preface to revised edition (Nov., 1882); viii-x, 
preface to new edition, dated Beverly Farms, 
Mass., June 18, 1891. Index on pp. 321-332. 
Riverside Edition, vol. ii. 

The Same. With illustrations. Boston, Houghton, 
Mifflin & Co,, 1892. 
Standard Library Edition, vol. ii. 



[174] 

The Same. Boston and New York, Houghton, 
Mifflin & Co., 1898. 
Crown 8vo. 

Cambridge Classics. Printed from the plates of the 
Riverside Edition, 

The Same. With illustrations by H. M. Brock. 
London, J. M. Dent & Co., 1902. 
12mo, pp. xvi, 320. 
Uniform with the same publishers' " Autocrat." Re- 
issued, in London and Boston, in 1906. See p. 170, 



The Same. With an Introduction by Richard 
Burton. New York, Thomas Y. Crowell & Co., 
1902. 

The Same. Boston, Houghton, Mifflin & Co., 
1902. 
16mo. 
Handy Volume Edition; printed from the plates of the 
Birthday Edition. 

CURRENTS AND COUNTER-CURRENTS 
IN MEDICAL SCIENCE 

Currents and Counter-Currents | in Medi- 
cal Science. | An | Address | delivered before 
the I Massachusetts Medical Society, | at the 
Annual Meeting, | May 30, 1860. | By Oliver 
Wendell Holmes, M. D. | [Motto'] \ Boston: | 
Published by Ticknor and Fields. \ D. Clapp, 
Printer . . . Med. and Surg. Journal Office. | 

MDCCCLX. 

* "NeWj/ (piffles IriTpoiy " Facilitate magis quam violentia." — Hippo- 
crates. 



[ 175 ] 

8vo, pamphlet, pp. 56, viz.: 1, blank; 2, 
" Extract from the Records ; " ^ 3, titM; 4, copy- 
right; 5-43, address; 44, blank; 45-48, notes; 
49-55, list of deceased members and obituaries;^ 
56, blank. 

There are copies of the pamphlet containing only 48 
pages, the list of deceased members and the obituaries 
being omitted. 

Currents and Counter-Currents in Medi- 
cal Science. | With | Other Addresses and 
Essays. | By | Oliver Wendell Holmes, | Park- 
man Professor of Anatomy and Physiology 
in Harvard University, late | Physician in the 
Massachusetts General Hospital, Member of 
the I Society for Medical Observation at Paris, 
Fellow of the | Massachusetts Medical Soci- 
ety, Fellow of the | American Academy of Arts 
and Sciences. | Boston: | Ticknor and Fields. \ 

MDCCCLXI. 

8vo, pp. [ii], xii, 406, and 18 of advertise- 
ments. Collation: [i], title; [ii], copyright; i, 
dedication: "To James Jackson, M. D., my 
earliest medical teacher, whose friendship and 
counsel have been among the chief pleasures 

^ At an adjourned meeting of the Fellows of the Massachusetts Medical 
Society, held on Thursday, May 31, 1860 — 

"Some discussion ensued in regard to the Annual Address, when the 
following resolution, offered by Dr. H. H. Childs, of Pittsfield, was adopted 
by a vote of nine in the aflBrmative and seven in the negative: — 

" Resolved, ' That the Society disclaim all responsibility for the senti- 
ments contained in this Annual Address.' 

" A true copy, 

"Attest: John B. Alley 
" Recording Secretary." 
^ "The notices of Drs. Perry and Roby were written by the author of 
the foregoing Address. The sources of the others are indicated." 



[ 176 ] 

and privileges of my life, these Essays are affec- 
tionately and respectfully dedicated;" ii, blank; 
iii-ix, preface; x, blank; xi, contents; xii, blank. 
Contents: — 

Currents and Counter-Currents in Medical Science, pp. 1-50. 

Homoeopathy and its Kindred Delusions, pp. 51-177. 

Some more Recent Views on Homoeopathy. A Notice of the 
" Homoeopathic Domestic Physician," pp. 179-188. First 
appeared in the Atlantic Monthly, Dec, 1857, vol. 1, pp. 
250-252. 

Puerperal Fever as a Private Pestilence. An Essay printed 
in 1843, reprinted with additions, 1855, pp. 189-278. First 
appeared in the New England Quarterly Journal of Medi- 
cine and Surgery, April, 1843, under the title " The Con- 
tagiousness of Puerperal Fever." ,^ 

The Position and Prospects of the Medical Student, pp. 279- 
321. 

The Mechanism of Vital Actions, pp. 323-382. First ap- 
peared in the North American Review, July, 1857, vol. 75, 
pp. 39-77. 

Valedictory Address, dehvered to the Medical Graduates of 
Harvard University, at the Annual Commencement, 
Monday, March 10, 1858, pp. 383-406. First appeared in 
the Boston Medical and Surgical Journal, March 25, 1858, 
vol. 58, pp. 149-159. 

There is a separate half-title to each essay. 

See Medical Essays, infray p. 189. , 

ELSIE VENNER 

Elsie Venner: | A Romance of Destiny. | By 
Oliver Wendell Holmes, | Author of "The Auto- 
crat of the Breakfast-Table," etc. | In Two Vol- 
umes. I Volume I. [II.] I Boston: Ticknor and 
Fields I MDCCCLXi. 

8vo; vol. i, pp. i-xii, 13-288; vol. ii, pp. i-iv, 
5-312. Collation of vol. i : i, blank; ii, list of Dr. 
Holmes's works ; iii, half-title; iv, blank; v, title; 



[ 177 ] 

vi, copyright and imprint; vii, dedication, "To 
the Schoolmistress who has furnished some out- 
hnes made use of in these pages and elsewhere, 
this story is dedicated by her Oldest Scholar;" 
viii, blank; ix-x, preface, dated January, 1861; 
xi-xii, contents. Vol. ii has no half-title. 

Originally appeared, under the title " The Professor's 
Story," in the Atlantic Monthly, January, 1860, to April, 
1861. 

The Same. Authorized Edition. Leipzig, Al- 
phons Durr, 1862. 
8vo, pp. 380. 

Elsie Venner. Boston, Houghton, Mifflin & Co., 
1883. 

12mo, pp. 487. On pp. vii-ix is "A Second 
Preface," dated Jan. 23, 1883. 

The Same. Boston, Houghton, Mifflin & Co., 
1891. 

Crown 8vo, pp. xvi, 487; new preface, dated 
Beverly Farms, Aug. 3, 1891, pp. xii-xiii. 
Riverside Edition, vol. v. 

The Same. Boston, Houghton, Mifflin & Co. 
[1892.] 

Illustrated with photogravures, etc. Standard Library 
Edition, vol. v. 

The Same. London, Walter Scott, Limited, Pa- 
ternoster Row. [1895?] 

8vo, pp. 362 and 14 of advertisements; plate. 
Original preface on p. 5, and "Second Preface," 
dated Jan. 23, 1883, on pp. 7-8. Text begins 
on p. 11. 



[178] 

The Same. Boston, Houghton, Mifflin & Co,, 
1898. 
Crown 8vo, pp. 487. 

Cambridge Classics. Printed from plates of Riverside 
Edition. 

TRANSLATION 

E.-D. Forgues | Elsie Venner | La Sorciere a 
L'Ambre | Imitations de I'Anglais | [Device] \ 
Paris I Collection Hetzel | — J. Hetzel — Librai- 
rie Claye — 1 18 Rue Jacob. 
12mo, pp. 320. 
The translation of Elsie Venner is on pp. 1-150. 

A dramatization of Elsie Venner was attempted, against 
Dr. Holmes's wish, and a play founded on the novel was 
brought out in 1865, at the Boston Theatre. " The result 
was absolute failure." ^ 

BORDER LINES OF KNOWLEDGE 

Border Lines of Knowledge | in some Pro- 
vinces of I Medical Science. | An Introductory 
Lecture, | delivered before the Medical Class 
of Harvard University, | November 6th, 1861. | 
By Oliver Wendell Holmes, M. D. | Parkman 
Professor of Anatomy and Physiology. | Boston : 
Ticknor and Fields, \ 1862. 

8vo, pp. ii, 80. Facing the title is an adver- 
tisement of Currents and Counter-Currents 
in Medical Science. Collation: i, title; ii, copy- 
right; 1, correspondence; 2, blank; 3, "To the 
Reader;" 4, blank; 5-78, lecture; 79-80, "The 
Two Armies" [poem]. 

» Morse's Life and Letters of O. W. H., vol. i, p. 257. 



[ 179 ] 

THE INEVITABLE TRIAL 

Oration | delivered before | the City Au- 
thorities OF Boston, | on the | Fourth of 
July, 1863, I by | OKver Wendell Holmes. | 
Boston, Ticknor and Fields. \ 1863. 

Pamphlet, 8vo, pp. 60; viz.: 1, title; 2, im- 
print (Printed by J. E, Farwell and Company, 
37 Congress Street); 3, vote of thanks of the 
City Council; 4, blank; 5-60, oration. 

Some copies bear on the title-page the imprint of J. E. 
Farwell and Co. Reprinted, under the title " The Inevit- 
able Trial," in Pages from an Old Volume of Life, 1883. 

The Same. Private Copy. Boston, J, E, Far- 
well and Company, Printers, 37 Congress Street, 
1863. 

4to, pp. viii, 71; viz.: i, title; ii, blank; iii, 
introductory note; iv, blank; v, half-title, 
"Oration;" vi, blank; vii, "principal altera- 
tions in the Address as delivered and printed;" 
viii, blank; 1-71, oration. 

The introductory note is as follows : — 

"The reader has before him the first draft of the 
Author's Address, turned into large, legible type, for the 
sole purpose of rendering easier its public delivery. 

" It represents, therefore, a rough manuscript, without 
those additions, omissions and emendations, by which 
the text is commonly more or less changed between the 
earliest copy and the last revised proof. 

" By the liberality of the City Authorities, twelve copies, 
of which this is one, were printed, and placed at the 
author's disposal. No others were struck off, with the 
exception of those which the printers were allowed to 
preserve as typographical specimens." 



[180] 

It is impossible to say how many copies were struck off 
for preservation by the printers. There are copies in 
existence which omit all reference to the number printed, 
and which show some variations in the text of the oration, 
although the same large type is used. In these copies 
there is a half-title, "Printed by order of the Common 
Council," the introductory note is omitted, and the oration 
is printed on pp. 5-75. 

The Same. Philadelphia: Printed for Gratuitous 
Distribution, 1863. 

Pamphlet, 8vo, pp. 30. 

LECTURE, 1863 
Lecture, 1863. 

See Appendix, p. .311, infra. 

NEW ENGLAND'S MASTER-KEY 

New England's Master-Key, 1864. 
See Appendix, p. 312, infra, 

POETRY OF THE WAR 

Lecture — 1865. 

4to, pp. 54, unnumbered; signatures 1-14. 
No title-page. 

The words " Lecture — 1865 " appear at the head of the 
first page. The covers are of blank paper and no au- 
thor's name is given. But the Liberator for Dec. 15, 1865, 
pubHshed an abstract of the lecture as having been 
delivered at Music Hall, "in the course of Fraternity 
Lectures," by Dr. Holmes, "on Tuesday evening last." 
The pamphlet, which is printed in very large type (great 
primer), is exceedingly rare, only 2 copies being known. 
One of these, in perfect condition, with Dr. Holmes's 
autograph on the cover, is in the collection of Mr. S. H. 
Wakeman. 



[ 181 ] 

THE GUARDIAN ANGEL 

The I Guardian Angel. | By Oliver Wendell 
Holmes, | Author of "The Autocrat of the 
Breakfast-Table," | "Elsie Venner," etc. | [De- 
vice] I Boston: | Ticknor and Fields, \ 1867. 

8vo, pp. xii, 420. Collation : i, title ; ii, copy- 
right and imprint; iii, dedication: "To James 
T. Fields, a token of kind regard from one of 
many writers who have found him a wise, 
faithful, and generous friend;" iv, blank; v-x, 
" To my Readers ; " xi-xii, contents. 

The Same. London, Sampson Low, Son, & 
Marston, Milton House, Ludgate Hill, 1867. 

2 vols., 12mo; vol. i, pp. xvi, 294, and 2 
of advertisements; vol. ii, pp. viii, 302, and 26 
of advertisements, the first 2 unnumbered. 

Reissued in 1869, in Low's Copyright Series of Ameri- 
can Authors ; the words " New Edition " being added to 
the title-page. 

The Same. Boston, Houghton, Mifflin & Co,, 
1883. 

Crown 8vo, pp. xvi, 431. New preface, dated 
1883. Printed from new plates. 

The Same. Boston, Houghton, Mifflin & Co., 
1891. 

Crown 8vo, pp. xvi, 431. New preface, dated 
Beverly Farms, Aug. 7, 1891. 
Riverside Edition, vol. vi. 

The Same. Boston, Houghton, Mifflin & Co. 
[1892.] 

Illustrated with photogravures, etc. Standard Library 
Edition, vol. vi. 



[182] 

TEACHING FROM THE CHAIR AND AT THE 
BEDSIDE 

Teaching from the Chair and at the 
Bedside. | An | Introductory Lecture | deliv- 
ered before the | Medical Class of Harvard 
University, | November 6, 1867. | By Oliver 
Wendell Holmes, | Parkman Professor of Ana- 
tomy and Physiology. | Printed at the request 
of the Class. | Boston: | David Clapp & Son 
— 334 Washington Street. | 1867. 
Pamphlet, 8vo, pp. 46. 

Reprinted in Medical Essays, 1883, under the title 
"Scholastic and Bedside Teaching." 

MEDICAL PROFESSION IN MASSACHUSETTS 

The I Medical Profession in Massachu- 
setts. | A Lecture | of a | Course by Members 
of the Massachusetts | Historical Society, | 
delivered before the Lowell Institute, | Jan. 
£9, 1869. I By | Oliver Wendell Holmes. | Bos- 
ton : I Press of John Wilson and Son, \ 1869. 
Pamphlet, 8vo, pp. 45. 

HISTORY OF THE AMERICAN STEREOSCOPE 

History of the American Stereoscope. | 
Joseph L. Bates, Boston. | Patented, Aug. 13, 
1867. I From the Philadelphia Photographer, | 
January, 1869. 

Pamphlet, 16mo, pp. 16, including title and 
2 pp. of advertisements. 

MECHANISM IN THOUGHT AND MORALS 

Mechanism | in | Thought and Morals. | An 



[ 183] 

Address | delivered before the Phi Beta Kappa 
Society of | Harvard University, June 29, 1870. | 
With Notes and Afterthoughts | by | OHver 
Wendell Holmes. | [Quotation from Pascal^] 
Boston I James R, Osgood & Co. | Late Tiek- 
nor & Fields, and Fields, Osgood, & Co. | 1871. 
8vo, pp. 101. 
Reprinted in Pages from an Old Volume of Life, 1883. 

VALEDICTORY ADDRESS AT BELLEVUE 
HOSPITAL 

Valedictory Address delivered to the Gradu- 
ating Class of the Bellevue Hospital College, 
March 2, 1871. New York, 1871. 
Pamphlet, 8vo, pp. 23. 

Reprinted from the New York Medical Journal, April, 
1871, vol. 13, pp. 420-440. Included in Medical Essays, 
1883, under the title " The Young Practitioner." 

THE CLAIMS OF DENTISTRY 

The Claims of Dentistry. | An Address | de- 
livered at the I Commencement Exercises | of 
the I Dental Department | in Harvard Univer- 
sity, I February 14, 1872, | by Oliver Wendell 
Holmes, M. D., | Parkman Professor of Ana- 
tomy. I Boston: | Printed by Rand, Avery & 
Co. I 1872. 

Pamphlet, 8vo, pp. 36. 

THE POET AT THE BREAKFAST-TABLE 

The I Poet | at | the Breakfast-Table. | He 
Talks with his Fellow-Boarders | and the 
Reader. | [Device] \ Boston: | James R. Osgood 

^ Car il ne faut pas se meconnaitre, nous somraes automates autant 
qu' esprit. 



[184] 

and Company, j late Ticknor & Fields, and 
Fields, Osgood, & Co. | 1872. . 

12mo, pp. ii, 418; frontispiece (the "Old 
Gambrel-Roofed House"); index on pp. 413- 
418. 

The Same. Boston, Houghton, Mifflin & Co., 
1883. 

12mo, pp. iv, 360; preface dated Dec, 1882. 

The Same. Author's Edition. Edinburgh, David 
Douglas, Castle Street, 1884. 
2 vols., 12mo, pp. ^5Q, 267. 

The Same. Boston, Houghton, Mifflin & Co,, 
1890. 

2 vols., 16mo; titles set in Old English type, 
within decorative borders ; pagination continued 
through the two volumes. 

Birthday Edition. About 300 copies were bound un- 
cut, with paper labels. 

The Same. Boston, Houghton, Mifflin & Co., 
1891. . 

8vo, pp. viii, 360; new preface, dated Beverly 
Farms, Aug. 1, 1891. 
Riverside Edition, vol. iii. 

The Same. Illustrated with photogravures, etc. 
Standard Library Edition, vol. iii. 

The Same. Boston, Houghton, Mifflin & Co., 
1902. 
16mo. 
Handy Volume Edition; printed from plates of Birth- 
day Edition. 



[ 185 ] 

The Same. With illustrations by H. M. Brock. 
London, /. M. Dent & Co., 1902. 
12mo, pp. xii, 351. 
Uniform with the same publishers' "Autocrat." Reis- 
sued in London and Boston, in 1906. See p. 170, supra. 

PROFESSOR JEFFRIES WYMAN 

Professor Jeffries Wyman. | A Memorial Out- 
line. I By Oliver Wendell Holmes. | Reprinted 
from the Atlantic Monthly for November, 
1874. 
Pamphlet, 8vo, pp. 16, including covers. 

CRIME AND AUTOMATISM 

Crime and Automatism. By Oliver Wendell 
Holmes. 

Pamphlet, Svo, pp. 16; n. p., n. d. 

Reprinted from the Atlantic Monthly, April, 1875. 

ADDRESS BEFORE THE BOSTON MICRO- 
SCOPICAL SOCIETY 

An Address | delivered at the | Annual 
Meeting of the Boston Microscopical | 
Society. | By | Oliver Wendell Holmes, M. D. | 
[Reprinted from the Boston Medical and Sur- 
gical Journal, May M, 1877.] | Cambridge: | 
Printed at the Riverside Press. | 1877. 
Pamphlet, 8vo. 

JOHN LOTHROP MOTLEY 

John Lothrop Motley. | A Memoir. | By Oliver 
Wendell Holmes. | [Device] \ Boston: | Hough- 
ton, Osgood and Company, \ The Riverside 
Press, Cambridge. | 1879. [c. 1878.] 



[186] 

Crown 8vo, pp. viii, 278; portrait. Collation: 
i, title ; ii, copyright, and imprint [Electrotyped 
and printed at the University Press, Cambridge] ; 
iii, introductory note; iv, blank; v-vii, con- 
tents; viii, blank; 1-224, text; 225-278, ap- 
pendices. 

Issued also on large paper. The introductory note is 
as follows: — 

"The Memoir here given to the public is based on a 
biographical sketch prepared by the writer at the request 
of the Massachusetts Historical Society, for its Proceed- 
ings. The questions involving controversies into which 
the Society could not feel called to enter are treated at 
considerable length in the following pages. Many details 
are also given which would have carried the paper written 
for the Society beyond the customary limits of such 
tributes to the memory of its deceased members. It is 
still but an outline which may serve a present need, and 
perhaps be of some assistance to a future biographer." 

The appendices include : (a) An account of the Satur- 
day Club, with Dr. Holmes's poem, " A Parting Health " 
(pp. 226-228); and {e) Proceedings of the Mass. Hist. 
Soc, June 14, 1877, including Dr. Holmes's remarks 
(pp. 257-269). 

LETTER TO RABELAIS CLUB 

Letter to the Honorary Secretaries of the 
Rabelais Club. 

Broadside, pp. 4, on tinted paper; pp. 1 and 
4, blank. 
" For Private Circulation only." 

Boston, March 21st, 1880. 
Gentlemen: 

It gives me great pleasure to accept the honour you have con- 
ferred upon me in choosing me as a member of the Rabelais 
Club. 



[ 187 ] 

I assure you it is very pleasant to receive such a kindly token 
of recognition from a Society of gentlemen whose names are so 
distinguished in the Hsts of artists and men of letters. When we 
get the Sub-Atlantic Telephone I hope to exchange a few words 
with you all. I ought to say to the Club that I have a special 
professional interest in its patron-Saint. 

In the year 1835, coming from Marseilles to Paris, I was de- 
layed a short time in Lyons, and strayed into a Httle mouse-hole 
of an old book shop. There I picked up two or three bouquins, 
one of which was a pudgy little volume just exactly as tall as 
the breadth of this paper. 

The title was 

APHORISMO. 

The bookbinder, probably a teetotaller, left out the RUM in 
lettering the back. The title page runs thus: 

Aphorismo 

Rum Hippocrates 

Sectiones 

Septem. 

* 

Ex Franc. Rabel^esi 

Recognitione 

* * * * 

Apud See. Gry- 

PHIUM Lu- 

GDINI 

1545. 

I will borrow from the dedicatory epistle prefixed by my 
learned professional brother, Dr. Francis Rabelais, to this edition 
of the Aphorisms of the Father of Medicine, a few words ex- 
pressing my good wishes for the Club. 

TJtinam ita floreat haec Societas ut in ea nostrates episcopi et 
omnes alii absolutissimum probitatis, modestise, humanitatis 
exemplar, veramque ilium virtutis ideam habeant, in quam 
contuentes aut ad propositum sibi speculum se moresque suos 
componant aut (quod ait Persius) virtutem videant, intabes- 
cantque relicta. 

I am. Gentlemen, 

Faithfully yours, 

Oliver Wendell Holmes. 



[188] 

JONATHAN EDWARDS 

Jonathan Edwards. | An Essay. | (From the 
International Review.) \ A. S. Barnes & Com- 
pany, I New York and Chicago. [1880.] 
Pamphlet, sq. 8vo, pp. 28. 
Reprinted in Pages from an Old Volume of Life, 1883. 

DEDICATORY ADDRESS — BOSTON MEDICAL 
LIBRARY ASSOCIATION 

Dedicatory Address at the Dedication of the 
New Building and Hall of the Boston Medical 
Library Association, 19 Boylston St., Dec. 3, 
1878. Cambridge, 1881. 
Pamphlet, 4to, pp. 21. 

Reprinted, under the title " Medical Libraries," in 
Medical Essays, 1883. 

MEDICAL HIGHWAYS AND BY-WAYS 
Medical Highways and | By- Ways. | A Lec- 
ture I delivered before the Students of the 
Medical | Department of Harvard University, | 
May 10, 1882. | By | Oliver Wendell Holmes, 
M. D., LL.D., I Parkman Professor of Ana- 
tomy. I [Reprinted from the Boston Medical 
and Surgical Journal.] | Cambridge: | Printed 
at the Riverside Press. | 1882. 
Pamphlet, 12mo, pp. 32. 

The Boston Medical Library Association owns the 
original ms. of this lecture, consisting of 36 quarto pages, 
with the title "Some Stepping-Stones and Stumbling- 
Blocks in the History of Medicine." The opening para- 
graph is different, and there are other trifling variations 
from the text as printed. 



-[189] 

FAREWELL ADDRESS 

Farewell Address | of | Dr. Oliver Wendell 
Holmes | to the | Medical School of Harvard 
University, | Tuesday, November 28, 1882. | 
[Reprinted from the Boston Medical and Sur- 
gical Journal of | December 7, 1882.] | Cam- 
bridge: I Printed at the Riverside Press. | 1882. 
Pamphlet, 12mo, pp. 24. 

Reprinted, under the title " Some of my Early Teachers," 
in Medical Essays, 1883. 

MEDICAL ESSAYS 

Medical Essays | 1842-1882. | By | Oliver Wen- 
dell Holmes. | Boston, Houghton^ Mifflin & 
Co,, 1883. 

8vo, pp. xii, 445. Collation: i, title; ii, copy- 
right; iii, contents; iv, blank; v-x, preface 
to Currents and Counter-Currents in Medi- 
cal Science, with Other Addresses and Essays, 
1861, except the last paragraph; xi-xii, a 
"Second Preface," dated March 21, 1883. 

Contents: — 

Homoeopatliy and its Kindred Delusions, pp. 1-102. 
The Contagiousness of Puerperal Fever, pp. 103-172. 
Currents and Counter-Currents in Medical Science, pp. 173- 

208. 
Border Lines of Ejiowledge in Some Provinces of Medical 

Science, pp. 209-272. 
Scholastic and Bedside Teaching, pp. 273-311. 
The Medical Profession in Massachusetts, pp. 312-369. 
The Young Practitioner, pp. 370-395. 
Medical Libraries, pp. 396-419. 
Some of my Early Teachers, pp. 420-440. 
Appendix [Notes to Currents and Counter-Currents], pp. 441- 

445. 



[190] 

The Same. Boston, Houghton, Mifflin & Co., 
1891. 

Crown 8vo, pp. xviii, 445; new preface, 
dated Beverly Farms, Aug. 3, 1891, pp. xiii- 
xvii. 

Riverside Edition, vol. ix; printed from plates of first 
edition. 

The Same. Boston, Houghton, Mifflin & Co. 
[1892.] 

Illustrated with photogravures, etc. Standard Library 
Edition, vol. ix. 

PAGES FROM AN OLD VOLUME OF LIFE 

Pages from an Old Volume | of Life | A 
Collection of Essays | 1857-1881 | by | Oliver 
Wendell Holmes | [Device] \ Boston | Hough- 
ton, Mifflin and Company \ New York: 11 
East Seventeenth Street | The Riverside Press, 
Cambridge | 1883. 

8vo, pp. iv, 433, and 16 of advertisements. 

Contents: — 
Bread and the Newspaper. Originally appeared in the 

Atlantic Monthly, Sept., 1861, vol. 8, pp. 346-352. 
My Hunt after "the Captain.'* Originally appeared in the 

Atlantic Monthly, Dec, 1862, vol. 10, pp. 738-764. 
The Inevitable Trial. Oration delivered before the City 

Authorities of Boston, July 4, 1863. 
The Physiology of Walking. Originally appeared, under the 

title "The Human Wheel, its Spokes and Felloes," in 

the Atlantic Monthly, May, 1863, vol. 11, pp. 567-580. 
The Seasons. Originally appeared in the Atlantic Almanac, 

1868, pp. 2-13. 
Talk concerning the Human Body and its Management. 

Originally appeared in the Atlantic Almanac, 1869, pp. 47- 

58. 



[ 191 ] 

Cinders from the Ashes. Originally appeared in the Atlantic 

Monthly, Jan., 1869, vol. 23, pp. 115-123. 
Mechanism in Thought and Morals. Phi Beta Kappa, 

Harvard, 1870. 
The Physiology of Versification. Originally appeared in 

the Boston Medical and Surgical Journal, Jan. 7, 1875, vol. 

92, pp. 6-9. 
Crime and Automatism. Originally appeared in the Atlantic 

Monthly, April, 1875, vol. 35, pp. 466-481. 
Jonathan Edwards. Originally appeared in the International 

Review, July, 1880, pp. 1-28. 
The Pulpit and the Pew. Originally appeared in the North 

American Review, Feb., 1881, vol. 132, pp. 117-138. 

The Same. Boston, Houghton, Mifflin & Co,, 
1891. 

Crown 8vo, pp. [ii], vi, 433; preface, dated 
Beverly Farms, Aug. 3, 1891. 

Riverside Edition, vol. viii; printed from plates of first 
edition. 

The Same. Boston, Houghton, Mifflin & Co, 
[1892.] 

Illustrated vrith photogravures, etc. Standard Library 
Edition, vol. viii. 

RALPH WALDO EMERSON 

American Men of Letters. | Ralph Waldo 
Emerson. | By | Oliver Wendell Holmes. | [De- 
vice] I Boston: | Houghton, Mifflin and Com- 
pany. I New York: 11 East Seventeenth Street. | 
The Riverside Press, Cambridge. | 1885. 
[c. 1884.] 

12mo, pp. [ii], xii, 441; portrait. Collation: 
[i], title; [ii], copyright and imprint; i, note; ii, 
blank; iii-viii, contents; ix-x, blank; xi, half- 
title; xii, motto; 1-421, text; 422, blank; 423- 
441, index. 



[ 192 ] 

On p. 350, first line, "eightieth" is erroneously printed 
for "seventy-ninth." ^ 

The Same. English Copyright Edition. London, 
Keg an Paul & Co,, 1885. 

8vo, pp. viii, 441. f 

A MORTAL ANTIPATHY 

A Mortal Antipathy | First Opening of | The 
New Portfolio | by | Oliver Wendell Holmes | 
[Device] \ Boston and New York | Houghton, 
Mifflin and Company \ The Riverside Press, 
Cambridge | 1885. 

8vo, pp. iv, 307, and 13 of advertisements. 
Originally appeared, under the title " The New Port- 
folio," in the Atlantic Monthly, Jan. to Dec., 1885. 
See Appendix, p. 312, infra. 

The Same. Boston, Houghton, Mifflin & Co., 
1891. 

Crown 8vo, pp. vi, 307; new preface, dated 
Beverly Farms, Aug., 1891. 

Riverside Edition, vol. vii. Printed from plates of 
first edition. 

The Same. Boston, Houghton, Mifflin & Co. 
[1892.] 

Illustrated with photogravures, etc. Standard Library 
Edition, vol. vii. 

OUR HUNDRED DAYS IN EUROPE 

Our Hundred Days | in Europe | by | Oliver 
Wendell Holmes | [Device] \ Boston and New 

* In his Memoir of Emerson read before the Massachusetts Historical 
Society, Jmie 11, 1885 (Proceedings, 2d series, vol. 2, p. 107), Rev. J. F. 
Clarke says of this work of Dr. Holmes: "It will, I think, be always re- 
garded as one of the best biographies in the language." 



[193] 

York I Houghton, Mifflin and Company \ The 
Riverside Press, Cambridge | 1887. 

Svo, pp. vi, 329, and 14 of advertisements. 
On p. iii is this dedication : " To my Daughter 
Amelia (Mrs. Turner Sargent), my Faithful 
and Devoted Companion, this Outline of our 
Summer Excursion is affectionately dedicated." 
Index, pp. 321-329. 

The index is preceded by tbe following note : " There 
are various ways of reading a book. A few diligent 
persons read, mark, learn, and inwardly digest every 
page, sentence, word, syllable. Quick-witted students 
glance through a volume, and find in a few moments 
what it has which is likely to be of interest for them. 
Some run their eyes rapidly over the Index, when there 
is one, which is no more than every book worth print- 
ing is entitled to. Some are satisfied with the Table 
of Contents. Others find the Title-page as much as they 
want, and there are many books, the wall-flowers of 
book-shops and libraries, which we are content to read 
by the lettering on their backs, without calling them out 
from their places. 

" The following Index, made for me under the direction 
of my publishers, frightened me, when I first looked at 
it, by its exhaustiveness and its extent. I struck out a 
few headings, altered a few others, and concluded to 
let it stand as a monument of industry and fidelity. But 
I must say that so long a tail to so small a kite is almost 
without a precedent in my literary experience." 

Originally appeared in the Atlantic Monthly, July, 
1886, March to Oct., 1887. The first, detached,^ install- 
ment, printed under the title " The New Portfolio — A 
Prospective Visit," fills 16 pages of the magazine, — 
only a small fraction being used for the introductory 
chapter — "A Prospective Visit" — of the volume. 



[ 194] 

The early issues of the first edition may reatdily be iden- 
tified, as they contain an extraordinary error. In one of 
the paragraphs of " A Prospective Visit " reprinted in the 
published book, Dr. Holmes says (p. 14 of vol. 58 of 
the Atlantic) : " Among the monuments [in Westminster 
Abbey], one to my namesake Rear Admiral C. H., a 
handsome young man standing by a cannon. He ac- 
companied Wolfe in his expedition which resulted in the 
capture of Quebec. Dryden has immortalized him, in 
the Annus Mirabilis, as 

"'the Achates of the General's fight.'" 

In a paper entitled "After Our Hundred Days," 
printed in the Atlantic for January, 1888 (vol. 6^1, pp. 127- 
130), we find the following : — 

" After the ' Hundred Days,' the story of which has 
been published in this magazine during the past year, 
the natural sequel would seem to be — Waterloo. I 
thought I had experienced that catastrophe when my 
attention was called to an anachronism of unusual 
dimensions in one of the early numbers. It is made all 
right in the more recent copies of the collected papers, 
but stands uncorrected in many of those first printed. . . . 

"How was it possible for a writer with some half 
dozen academic gowns on his back, a member of the 
Historical Society and contributor to its annals, to have 
spoken of the companion of Wolfe in his victory at Quebec, 
in 1759, as having been commemorated in Dryden's 
Annus Mirabilis, which was published in 1667, nearly a 
century earlier ? It could hardly be ignorance, — the 
pons asinorum is not long enough to stretch over such 
an interval." 

As revised, the passage reads (p. 4): "Among the 
monuments, one to Rear Admiral Charles Holmes, a 
descendant, perhaps, of another namesake, immortal- 
ized by Dryden in the * Annus Mirabilis ' as 
"*the Achates of the general's fight.' 



[195] 

"He accompanied Wolfe in his expedition which re- 
sulted in the capture of Quebec." 

Thus is afforded a certain means of identifying the first 
issue of **Our Hundred Days." The same article ex- 
plains one or two other matters in this volume, but the 
explanations do not involve changes in the text. 

The Same. London, Sampson Low, Marston, 
Searle, & Rivington, Limited, St. Dunstan's 
House, Fetter Lane, Fleet Street, E. C, 1888. 
Royal 8vo, pp. vi, 316; portrait. Collation: 
i, notice of limit of edition; ii, blank; iii, title; 
iv, "works by the same author;" v, dedication; 
vi, blank; 1-307, text; 308-316, index. 
Large paper edition, limited to 100 copies. 

The Same. Boston, Houghton, Mifflin & Co., 
1891. 

8vo, pp. viii, 301 ; pp. 209-301, General Index. 

Riverside Edition, vol. x; from new plates. The Gen- 
eral Index covers this and the preceding nine volumes, — 
that is, all the collected prose works except the Emerson 
and the Motley, which were subsequently printed together 
as vol. xi of this edition. 

The Same. Boston, Houghton, Mifflin & Co, 
[1892.] 

Illustrated with photogravures, etc. Standard liibrary 
Edition, vol. x. 

HENRY J. BIGELOW, M. D. 

Tribute to the Memory of Henry J. Btge- 
Low, M. D., read at the meeting of the Society 
for Medical Improvement, Nov. 4, 1890. 
Printed at the University Press, 1891. 
Pamphlet, 8vo, pp. 15, including title. 



[196] 

Reprinted from the Proceedings of the American 
Academy of Arts and Sciences, May 26, 1891, vol. 26, 
pp. 339-351. 

The original ms. of this address is now among the 
treasures of the Boston Medical library Association, pre- 
sented by Dr. Albert N. Blodgett in 1903. 

OVER THE TEACUPS 

Over the Teacups | by | Oliver Wendell Holmes 
I Author of "The Autocrat of the Breakfast- 
Table" I [Vignette] \ Boston and New York | 
Houghton, Mifflin and Company \ The River- 
side Press, Cambridge | 1891. [c. 1890.] 
8vo, pp. 319. 

On p. 3 is a prefatory note, giving the history of the 
Henry Flynt teapot, of which there is a representation 
on that page. 

The text begins on p. 5, with some introductory matter 
explaining the fact that, while the first installment was 
published in the Atlantic Monthly in March, 1888, the 
second did not appear until Jan., 1890. The paragraph 
on p. 6, which begins, ''The readers who take up this 
volume," is the true beginning of the book, but there are 
some changes in the text as it appeared in the magazine. 
The first words in the latter are: "The readers of this 
magazine may recollect," etc., and several lines at the 
end of the first paragraph are omitted in the published 
volume. Passing over some slight changes in the way 
of revision of the text, the passage on pp. 18-20 of the 
volume, beginning, " I referred, when first reporting," 
etc., and ending with the italicized phrase, ^'but it did,'' 
does not occur in the magazine, where its place is 
taken by this brief paragraph only : — 

"I have had a whole chapter of curious coincidences, 
some of which, strange as they were, it was impossible 



[ 197 ] 

to believe were in any causal relation. The Grenville- 
Tudor case was the most picturesque among them; the 
Mary Salter case the most unlikely to happen. But I am 
afraid I have told them already, somewhere or other, and 
I will say nothing about them at this time." 

The first lines of the next paragraph read in the 
Atlantic: "I could not keep my own personality out 
of this paper;" and the concluding paragraph of the 
chapter does not appear there. 

At the beginning of the second chapter the Atlantic 
(Jan., 1890) reads: "I know that it is a hazardous ex- 
periment to return to these pages where in days long past 
I have found a generous welcome." 

This first edition of Over the Teacups was issued in 
London in the same year, with the imprint of Sampson 
Low & Co. 

The Same. Boston, Houghton, Mifflin & Co., 
1891. 

Crown 8vo, pp. [vi], ii, 5-319. 

Riverside Edition, vol. iv; printed from the plates of 
the first edition. 

The Same. Boston, Houghton, Mifflin & Co. 

[1892.] 

Illustrated with photogravures, etc. Standard Library 
Edition, vol. iv. 

The Same. Boston, Houghton, Mifflin & Co., 
1895. 

2 vols., 16mo; title-pages set in Old English 
type, within decorative border; pagination con- 
tinued through the two volumes. 

Birthday Edition. Uniform with other volumes of 
" The Breakfast-Table Series." About 300 copies were 
bound uncut, with paper labels. 



[ 198 ] 

The Same. Boston, Houghton, Mifflin & Co., 
1902. 
16mo. 

Handy Volume Edition. Printed from plates of Birth- 
day Edition. 

EMERSON — MOTLEY 

Ralph Waldo Emerson | John Lothrop 
Motley | Two Memoirs | by | Oliver Wen- 
dell Holmes | {Device] | Boston and New 
York I Houghton, Mifflin and Company \ The 
Riverside Press, Cambridge. [1892.] 

8vo, pp. xiv, 542. Collation: i, half-title; ii, 
blank; iii, title; iv, copyright; v-xi, contents; 
xii, blank; xiii, half-title [R. W. E,»]; xiv, note; 
1-325, Ralph Waldo Emerson; 326, blank; 
327, half-title [J. L. M.]; 328, note; 329-526, 
John Lothrop Motley; 527-542, index. 

Riverside Edition, vol. xi. 300 copies printed on large 
paper. This volume was added in 1892. 

The Same. Illustrated. Houghton, Mifflin & 
Co., 1892. 

Standard Library Edition, vol. xi. The collation 
corresponds with the last, except that a list of illustra- 
tions, with verso blank (xiii-xiv), follows the contents, and 
the R. W. E. half-title and the note are on pp. xv and xvi. 

whittier commemoration 

Letter to William H. Baldwin, Esq., read at 
the Whittier Commemoration at the Boston 
Young Men's Christian Union, Sunday, Oct. 16, 
1892. 
Broadside, pp. 4; pp. 1 and 4 blank. 



[ 199 ] 

The following works, believed to be the only 
ones as to which Dr. Holmes performed the 
functions of editor, are placed here for con- 
venience. 

Principles of the Theory and Practice of Medi- 
cine. By Marshall Hall, M. D., F. R. S. L[ondon] and 
E[dinburgh]. First American Edition. Revised and much 
enlarged by Jacob Bigelow, M. D., and Oliver Wendell 
Holmes, M. D. Boston, Charles C. Little and James 
Brown, 1839. 

8vo, pp. iv, 724. 

Medical Directions written for Governor Winthrop 
by Ed: Stafford, of London, In 1643. With Notes, by 
O. W. Holmes, M. D. Reprinted from the Proceedings 
of the Massachusetts Historical Society. Boston : Printed 
by John Wilson and Son, 22, School Street. 186^, 

Pamphlet, Svo, pp. 2S, 



COLLECTED WORKS 

Riverside Edition. 

13 vols., crown 8vo. With portraits, notes by 
Dr. Holmes, etc. Boston, Houghton, Mifflin & 
Co., 1891. 

Vol. I. The Autocrat of the Breakfast-Table. 

Vol. II. The Professor at the Breakfast-Table. 

Vol. III. The Poet at the Breakfast-Table. 

Vol. IV. Over the Teacups. 

Vol. V. Elsie Venner. 

Vol. VI. The Guardian Angel. 

Vol. VII. A Mortal Antipathy. 

Vol. VIII. Pages from an Old Volume of Life. 

Vol. IX. Medical Essays. 

Vol. X. Our Hundred Days in Europe. 

Vol. XI-XIII. Poems. 

In 1892 the Memoir of Motley and the Emerson were 
printed together, and the volume was added to the River- 
side Edition as vol. xi, the numbers of the three volumes 
of poems being changed to xii, xiii, and xiv. 

Three hundred copies of this edition were printed on 
large paper, and numbered. 

Issued in England with imprint of Sampson Low & Co. 

Standard Library Edition. 

13 vols., 8vo. More than 100 photogravures 
and engravings on steel. Boston, Houghton, 
Mifflin & Co., 1892. 

Printed from the plates of the Riverside Edition. The 
contents of the different volumes are the same, except 
that the poems occupy only two volumes, xii and xiii. 
Vol. xii contains the poems included in vol. xi and the 



[201] 

first 158 pages of vol. xii of the Riverside Edition. After 
the publication of Mr. Morse's Life and Letters of 
O. W. H., those two volumes were added to the Standard 
Library Edition as vols, xiv and xv. 

Artists' Edition. 

13 vols., 8vo. Illustrated. Boston, Houghton^ 

Mifflin & Co, [1892-1896.] 
Limited to 750 copies. Plates of the Standard Library 

Edition printed on India paper and mounted. 
Popular Edition. 

8 vols., crown 8vo. Boston and New York, 

Houghton, Mifflin & Co. [1900.] 

Vol. I. The Autocrat of the Breakfast-Table. 

Vol. II. The Professor at the Breakfast-Table. 

Vol. III. The Poet at the Breakfast-Table. 

Vol. IV. Over the Teacups. 

Vol. V. Elsie Venner. 

Vol. VI. The Guardian Angel. 

Vol. VII. A Mortal Antipathy. 

Vol. VIII. Poems. 

Printed from the plates of the Riverside Edition, except 

the last volume (Poems), which is identical with the 

latest issue of the Household Edition. The volumes are 

not numbered except in the publishers' catalogues. 

Autocrat Edition. The Complete Writings of 
Oliver Wendell Holmes, with Introductory and 
Explanatory Notes. Boston and New York, 
Houghton, Mifflin & Co., 1904. 

13 vols., crown 8vo; uniform in contents with 
the Standard Library Edition. Illustrated with 
78 full-page photogravures, a complete series of 
portraits of Dr. Holmes, etc. 

The illustrations are in great measure new. The edi- 
tion is one of a " New Library Series." 



SELECTIONS AND COMPILATIONS 

The Collegian | in Six Numbers | Cambridge : | 
Published by Hilliard and Brown. | m dccc xxx. 

The poems which Dr. Holmes contributed to this 
publication are given in the list printed below. Those 
preceded by an asterisk have never been printed in any 
of the collections of his poems; those preceded by a 
dagger were printed in the collections of 1836 and 1849, 
in the Blue and Gold Edition of 1862, and in the Handy 
Volume Edition, 1881, but were omitted from the House- 
hold Edition, and from all subsequent collections prior 
to the Cambridge Edition of 1895. 

The Collegian is almost invariably found in the shape 
of a bound volume; the compiler has been unable to 
place a set of the original numbers, although he is in- 
formed that such sets are in existence. 

No. 1. February, 1830. 

* Runaway Ballads, I and H, pp. 11-12. 
The Toad-Stool, pp. 23-24. 

* An Enigma, p. 43. 
No. 2. March, 1830. 

f The Last Prophecy of Cassandra, pp. 55-56. 

* Romance, p. 60. 

* Scene from an Unpublished Play, pp. 61-62. 
No. 3. April, 1830. 

To a Caged Lion, p. 103. 

The Cannibal, pp. 103-106. 

f To my Companions, pp. 122-123. 

The Dorchester Giant, pp. 123-125. 

* Scene from an Unpublished Play, pp. 138-140. 
No. 4. May, 1830. 

The Spectre Pig, pp. 180-182. 
Reflections of a Proud Pedestrian, p. 199. 

* An Invocation, pp. 199-200. 



[ 203 ] 

No. 5. June, 1830. 

The Mysterious Visiter, pp. 212-214. 

The Meeting of the Dryads, pp. 221-223. 
No. 6. July, 1830. 

Evening, by a Tailor, pp. 255-256. 

* Octosyllabics, pp. 261-263. 

* Scene from an Unpublished Play, pp. 265-268. 
Stanzas, p. 268. 

* Moonshine, p. 277. 

* The Old Gentleman's Story, pp. 277-279. 

* The Graduate's Song, p. 282. 

The Height of the Ridiculous, pp. 285-286. 

* The Tail-Piece, pp. 289-290. 

In a note to the Proceedings of the Harvard Club of New 
York City at the dinner of February 21, 1878, to which Dr. 
Holmes contributed the two sonnets, "Christo et Ecclesise" and 
"Veritas," we find the following: "After the reading of Dr. 
Holmes's explanatory letter, the printed copies of the sonnets 
were distributed among the guests. The magazine referred to in 
the letter was the Collegian, a journal published by the under- 
graduates of the Classes of 1830 and 1831. It was edited by a 
Club consisting of William H. Simmons (*Luke Lockfast'), 
Robert Habersham (' Frank Airy '), Frederick W.Brune ('Arthur 
Templeton'), of the Class of 1831; and of Theodore W. Snow 
('Geoffrey La Touche') and John O. Sargent ('Charles Sherry' 
and ' Francis Hock ') of the Classof 1830. Oliver Wendell Hohnes, 
of the Class of 1829, an honorary member of the Club, was then 
a law-student at Cambridge, and contributed one or more poems 
to every number of the magazine; beginning with his 'Runaway 
Ballads,' and concluding with a 'L'Envoi' [sic] that is among 
the most charming productions of his pen, though it has never, 
we think, appeared among his collected poems.^ We should not 
omit to mention that in the Collegian is to be found the first 
printed composition of John Lothrop Motley, of the Class of 
1832. " 

None of Dr. Holmes's poems are signed, but a note to the 
table of contents says that' all the titles marked with an asterisk 
are by the same contributor, so that the identification is not 
difficult. Dr. Holmes tells of his connection with this "little 

' It will be found in full, under its proper title, "The Tail-Piece," supra, 
pp. 75-77. 



[ 204 ] 

monthly concern" in a letter to Phinieas Barnes, printed in 
Mr. Morse's Life and Letters, on pp. 67-69 of vol. i. 

In the Harvard Magazine for Jan., 1858 (vol. 4, pp. 6-8), 
there is an interesting history of the Collegian, in an article on 
"College Magazines." 

The I Amateur | A Journal of Literature and 
the Fine Arts | Edited by Frederick S. Hill | 
Vol. 1. I Boston. I Published at the Office of 
the New England Galaxy. | 1830. 
Engraved title-page. 

Contains the following poems by Dr. Holmes, an 
asterisk marking those which have not found a place 
in any of the collected editions of his poems. 

No. 1. June 15, 1830. 

Annual Exhibition of Paintings. 

* The Fish-Pieces, pp. 12-13. 

* The Idle Boys, p. 13. 

* The Gipsy, p. 13. 
The Athenceum Gallery. 

* The Departure, p. 16. 

* Portrait of a Lady, p. 16. 

* Lady Drinking, p. 16. 
No. 2. July 3, 1830. 

From a Bachelor's Private Journal, p. 22. 
The AthenoBum Gallery. 

* Sunset Scene, p. 24. 
Poultry,^ p. 24. 

No. 3. July 17, 1830. 

The Ballad of the Oysterman, pp. 37-38. 

To a Blank Sheet of Paper, pp. 39-40. 
No. 4. Aug. 7, 1830. 

* The Two Shadows, p. 59. 

State Prison Melodies: ^ The Treadmill Song, p. 59. 
No. 6. Sept. 4, 1830. 

* Poetry of Real Life: The Fhes, p. 90. 

^ Printed in Poems, 1836, and subsequent collections, under the title 
" A Noontide Lyric." 

' This portion of the title was never used again. 



[205] 

* Domestic Thoughts, p. 92. 

* InfeUx Senectus, p. 95. 

No. 7. Oct. 1, 1830. 

The Star and the Lily,* p. 105. 

* Song of the Henpecked, p. 116. 
No. 16. March 12, 1831. 

* To the Lady Opposite, p. 244. 
No. 17. March 26, 1831. 

The Last Leaf, p. 261. 
No. 18. April 9, 1831. 

Lines by a Very Interesting Young Man,^ p. 273. 

* City Madrigals: by the Author of State Prison Melodies, 
p. 275. 

No. 19. April 23, 1831. 

* To my Neighbour Who Sings and Plays on the Flute, 
pp. 291-292. 

^ Scene from an Unpublished Comedy, p. 294. 
This hst includes eight poems which are found in all col- 
lected editions. As some of these eight are signed H., and 
others O. W. H., the compiler has attributed to Dr. Holmes 
all of those in the magazine which are signed in either way. 

The Gleaner, or Selections in Prose and Poetry 
from the Periodical Press. Boston, Office of 
the New England Galaxy, 1830. 

Contains the following poems by Dr. Holmes. This is, 
so far as is positively known, the first appearance of any 
work of his elsewhere than in periodicals. "Banditti," 
now known as " The Music-Grinders," had appeared in 
the New England Galaxy, " Evening " in the Collegian, 
and the others in the Amateur. 
Banditti. 

* The Two Shadows. 

* Infelix Senectus. 
Evening: by a Tailor. 
The Treadmill Song. 

^ Printed in Poems, 1836, and subsequent collections, under the title 
"The Star and the Water-Lily." 

^ Printed in Poems, 1836, and subsequent collections, under the title 
"Lines by a Clerk." 



[ 206 ] 

The I Laurel: | A Gift for all Seasons. | Being 
a I Collection of Poems | [Ornament] | by Amer- 
ican Authors. I Boston: | Edward R, Broaders. \ 
1836. [c. 1835.] 

Contains the following poems by Dr. Holmes, all of 
which had been published elsewhere. As, however, those 
preceded by an asterisk had previously appeared only in 
periodicals, they were first "collected" in this volume. 
The others had been printed in the Harbinger. 

* To a Blank Sheet of Paper, pp. 23-25. 

* Old Ironsides, pp. 41-42. 

* The Last Prophecy of Cassandra, pp. 53-55. 
From a Bachelor's Private Journal, pp. 65-66. 

* To my Companions, pp. 95-97. 
Stanzas, p. 99. 

The Dilemma,^ pp. 102-104. 

* The Star and the Lily, pp. 139-141. 
The Dying Seneca, pp. 184-185. 
The Last Leaf, pp. 202-203. 

Poets and Poetry of America. By R-ufus 
Wilmot Griswold. 1850. 
Selections from Holmes's poems on pp. 360-368. 

Chimes of Freedom and Union. Boston: Pub- 
lished by Benjamin B, Russell, 1861. 
Contains the following poems of Dr. Holmes: — 
Under the Washington Elm, p. 5. 
Army Hymn, pp. 14-15. 

Brother Jonathan's Lament for Sister Caroline, pp. 27-28. 
A Voice of the Loyal North, p. 44. 
This was the first publication elsewhere than in periodicals of 
all except the "Army Hymn." 

Lyrics of Loyalty. Arranged and edited by 
Frank Moore. New York, George P. Putnam, 
1864. [c. 1863.] 

* Spelled "Dillema" in contents. 



[207] 

Contains the following poems of Dr. Holmes: — 

The Flower of Liberty, pp. 116-117. 

Trumpet Song, pp. 150-152. 

Voyage of the Good Ship Union, pp. 184-188. 

An Appeal ["Never or Now"], pp. 241-242. 
The first and only appearance of the "Trumpet Song," and 
the first known appearance of "Never or Now." 

Soundings from the Atlantic. | By | Oliver 
Wendell Holmes. | [Device] \ Boston : | Ticknor 
and Fields. \ 1864. [c. 1863.] 

8vo, pp. viii, 468, and 22 of advertisements. 

Dedicated to Dr. Jacob Bigelow. 
Contents: — 

Bread and the Newspaper, pp. 1-23. 

My Hunt after "The Captain," pp. 24-123. 

The Stereoscope and the Stereograph, pp. 124-165. 

Sun-Painting and Sun-Sculpture, pp. 166-227. 

Doings of the Sunbeam, pp. 228-281. 

The Human Wheel, its Spokes and Felloes, pp. 282-327. 

A Visit to the Autocrat's Landlady, pp. 328-347. 

A Visit to the Asylum for Aged and Decayed Punsters, 
pp. 348-361. 

The Great Instrument, pp. 362-400. 

The Inevitable Trial,^ pp. 401-468. 

For the original appearance of each of these articles in the 
Atlantic, see their respective titles in the alphabetical Hst (prose). 

Verses from the Island Book. Cambridge: 
Printed at the Riverside Press, 1865. 
Contains the following poems by Dr. Holmes: — 
Prelude, p. iii. 

Song ["Island Hunting-Song"]. 
Answer to an Invitation ["To Governor Swain"]. 
The Last I^ok. 
The "Song" had previously been printed, under its longer 
title, in Poems, 1849, 2d issue, and " To Governor Swain " 

* Oration delivered before the City Authorities of Boston, July 4, 
1863. 



[ 208 ] 

and "The Last Look," in Songs in Many Keys, 1862. The 
"Prelude " was written for this very rare volume, which contains 
many other poems written on or concerning Naushon Island; 
it has never been reprinted and is given in full herewith. 

For Dr. Holmes's sentiments touching Naushon and its 
owners, see the Autocrat of the Breakfast-Table, Riverside 
Edition, pp. 39-41. 

O Thou who lovest best the song 

Of bird that never sang in cage. 
Such are the wood-notes that belong 

To this, our Island song-book's page! 

O'er its fair field the fancy flits 
That never bounden book confined, 

And on its perch the warbler sits 

Whom leaden chains could never bind. 

As when the birds in copse and glen, 

From oaken bough and birchen spray, — 

Thrush, robin, sparrow, bobolink, wren, 
Blackbird and bluebird, finch and jay, — 

With joyous clamor wake the morn 

And startle all the leafy woods. 
To thrill these poet-voices, born 

In Nature's seagirt solitudes! 

Ah, happy seasons, lapsing sweet 

Amid those bowers of peace and rest. 

When all the songsters loved to meet 
And carol roimd the King-bird's nest, 

Your flowers are dust, your suns have set, 
Yet here they still shall bloom and shine, 

Till Love and Friendship both forget 
They knelt before the Island shrine! 
November, 1864. 

Humorous Poems. By Oliver Wendell Holmes. 
With Illustrations by Sol Eytinge, Jr. [Device] 
Boston: Ticknor and Fields, 1865. 
24mo, paper, pp. 100 (i-iv, 5-100). 



1 



[ 209 ] 

Contents: — 

The Ballad of the Oysterman. 

To an Insect. 

The Dilemma. 

Daily Trials. 

To the Portrait of "A Lady." 

Reflections of a Proud Pedestrian. 

The Dorchester Giant. 

The Music-Grinders. 

The September Gale. 

The Toadstool. 

The Spectre Pig. 

The Treadmill Song. 

My Aunt. 

Lines recited at the Berkshire Festival. 

Verses for After-Dinner. 

Poem for the Centennial Celebration of Harvard College. 

Evening: by a Tailor. 

Nux Postcoenatica. 

The Stethoscope Song. 

On Lending a Punch-Bowl. 

The Height of the Ridiculous. 

Latter-Day Warnings. 

Prologue [from the "Autocrat"]. 

The Deacon's Masterpiece. 

The Old Man of the Sea. 

Ode for a Social Gathering. 

Parson Tur ell's Legacy. 

Contentment. 

De Sauty. 

Estivation. 

The Old Man Dreams. 

What we all Think. 

The Comet. 

The Last Blossom. 

"The Boys." 

A Sea Dialogue. 

The Jubilee. 

The Sweet Little Man. 

Our Oldest Friend. 

Farewell to Agassi z. 



[210] 

"The Jubilee," "A Sea Dialogue," and "A Farewell to 
Agassiz " had not previously appeared in any collection of 
Dr. Holmes's poems, and while the last two have never since 
been omitted, "The Jubilee," which, hke "A Sea Dialogue," 
was originally written for The Boatswain's Whistle, published 
by the National Sailors' Fair during the war, has never ap- 
peared again. 

Wit AND Humour. Poems by the Autocrat of 
the Breakfast-Table. London, John Camden 
Hotten, Piccadilly, W., 1867. 
8vo, pp. 192. 

Contains an introduction by Mr. Hotten and the fol- 
lowing poems : — 
The Ballad of the Oysterman. 
To an Insect. 
The Dilemma. 
Daily Trials. 

To the Portrait of "A Lady." 
Reflections of a Proud Pedestrian. 
The Dorchester Giant. 
The Music-Grinders. 
The September Gale. 
The Toadstool. 
The Spectre Pig. 
The Treadmill Song. 
My Aunt. 

Lines recited at the Berkshire Festival. 
Verses for After Dinner. 

A Song for the Centennial Celebration of Harvard College. 
Evening. 

Nux Postcoenatica. 
The Stethoscope Song. 
On Lending a Punch-Bowl. 
The Height of the Ridiculous. 
Latter-Day Warnings. 
Prologue. 

The Deacon's Masterpiece 
The Old Man of the Sea. 
Ode for a Social Meeting. 



[211] 

Parson Turell's Legacy. 

Contentment. 

De Sauty. 

Estivation. 

The Old Man Dreams. 

What we all Think. 

The Comet. 

The Last Blossom. 

"The Boys." 

A Sea Dialogue. 

The Jubilee. 

The Sweet Little Man. 

Our Oldest Friend. 

A Farewell to Agassiz. 

The Last Leaf. 

The Mysterious Visitor. 

Lines by a Clerk. 

To the Portrait of "A Gentleman." 

The Hot Season. 

A Modest Request. 

Parnassus, edited by Ralph Waldo Emerson, 
1874. 

Contains the following poems of Dr. Holmes, under the 
categories indicated: — 
Heroic. 

Old L*onsides. 

Never or Now. 
Personal. 

To George Peabody. 
Humorous. 

The Deacon's Masterpiece. 

Dorothy Q. 

Contentment. 

Rudolph the Headsman. 

Favorite Poems. By Oliver Wendell Holmes. 
Illustrated. [Ornament] Boston: James R. 
Osgood and Company, late Ticknor & Fields, 
and Fields, Osgood & Co., 1877. 



[212] 

32mo, pp. 105; plates; advertisements on 
inside of both covers, and on pages facing 
them. 

Contents: — 
Old Ironsides. 
Our Yankee Girls. 
The Last Leaf. 
My Aunt. 

Reflections of a Proud Pedestrian. 
The Dorchester Giant. 
The Comet. 

The Ballad of the Oysterman. 
The Music-Grinders. 
The September Gale. 
The Height of the Ridiculous. 
The Hot Season. 
The Steamboat. 

Lines recited at the Berkshire Festival. 
On Lending a Punch-Bowl. 
The Stethoscope Song. 
The Wonderful One-Hoss Shay. 
Contentment. 
The Old Man Dreams. 
The Chambered Nautilus. 
The Two Armies. 
Musa. 

The Two Streams. 
Avis. 

Dorothy Q. 
Army Hynm. 
Liternational Ode. 
Parting Hymn. 

Holmes Leaflets. Poems and Prose Passages 
from the works of Oliver Wendell Holmes. 
For Reading and Recitations. Compiled by 
Josephine E. Hodgdon. Illustrated. Boston, 
Houghton, Mifflin & Co. [1881.] 

8vo, pp. 107; with portrait and many other 
cuts. 



I 



[213] 

This volume is made up of poems and prose selections, 
each beginning on a right-hand page. On p. 11 "The 
Poet to the Children," Dr. Holmes's letter to the School 
Children of Cincinnati, Ohio, on their celebration of his 
seventy-first year. The prose selections are all taken from 
the Breakfast-Table Series. 

Reissued in 1891 as extra number H of the Riverside 
Literature Series. The recent impressions, since Dr. 
Holmes's death, have contained a Biographical Sketch. 

Grandmother's Story, and Other Poems, with 
Notes and a Biographical Sketch. Boston, 
Houghton, Mifflin & Co., 1883. 

12mo, pp. 96; portrait, and cut of Holmes's 
Birthplace. 

Riverside Literature Series, no. 6. 
Contents : — 

Biographical Sketch [as in Poems, Household Edition]. 

Grandmother's Story. 

How the Old Horse Won the Bet. 

An Appeal for "The Old South." 

A Ballad of the Boston Tea-Party. 

The Ballad of the Oysterman. 

Reflections of a Proud Pedestrian. 

Evening: By a Tailor. 

The Ploughman. 

The Old Man of the Sea. 

Dorothy Q: a Family Portrait. 

Bill and Joe. 

The Last Leaf. 

Brother Jonathan's Lament for Sister Caroline. 

For the Services in Memory of Abraham Lincoln. 

Ode for Washington's Birthday. 

Lexington. 

Old Ironsides. 

Robinson of Leyden. 

The Pilgrim's Vision. 

The Living Temple. 



[ 214 ] 

I The Chambered Nautilus. 
Contentment. 
The Two Armies. 
Spring. 

Centennial Celebration of Harvard College, 1836. 
The Steamboat. 
The Deacon's Masterpiece. 
The Broomstick Train. 
Under the Washington Elm, Cambridge. 
Freedom, Our Queen. 
The Flower of Liberty. 
Union and Liberty. 
God Save the Flag! 
A Sun-Day Hymn. 

Favorite Poems, and My Hunt after " the 
Captain." By Oliver Wendell Holmes. Boston, 
Houghton, Mifflin and Company. New York : 
11 East Seventeenth Street. The Riverside 
Press, Cambridge, 1884. 

32mo, pp. 307; with illustrations; adver- 
tisements of Modern Classics on inside covers 
and pages facing them. 

Modern Classics, no. 30. The volume contains the fol- 
lowing poems in addition to those printed in the Favorite 
Poems of 1877. 

Lexington. 

After a Lecture on Moore. 

The Hudson. 

Semi-centennial Celebration of the New England Society. 

For the Meeting of the Burns Club. 

Birthday of Daniel Webster. 

Brother Jonathan's Lament for Sister Caroline. 

Union and Liberty. 

Robinson of Leyden. 

Aunt Tabitha. 

Bill and Joe. 

The Boys. 



[215] 

The Last Charge. 
A Ballad of the Boston Tea-Party. 
Never or Now. 
Bryant's Seventieth Birthday. 
At a Dinner to General Grant. 
At a Dinner to Admiral Farragut. 
To H. W. Longfellow. 
For the Commemoration Services [Lincoln]. 
Edward Everett. 
At the Atlantic Dinner. 
Grandmother's Story of Bunker-Hill Battle. 
How the Old Horse Won the Bet. 

The poems fill 205 pages; "My Hunt after *the Captain'" 
begins on p. 207, with a separate half-title. 

Selections from the Breakfast-Table Series 

AND Pages from an Old Volume of Life. 

By Oliver Wendell Holmes. Boston and New 

York, Houghton, Mifflin & Co, [1884.] 

32mo, pp. 332; advertisements of Modern 

Classics on inside covers and pages facing 

them; index, pp. 331-332. 

Modem Classics, no. 33. 

Contents: — 

Selections from the Autocrat. 
Selections from the Professor. 
Selections from the Poet. 
The Physiology of Walldng. 
Cinders from the Ashes. 

Illustrated Poems of Oliver Wendell 
Holmes, with Illustrations by George Ran- 
dolph Barse [and 19 others] [Device]. Boston, 
Houghton, Mifflin and Company. New York: 
11 East Seventeenth Street ; The Riverside 
Press, Cambridge, 1885. 

4to, pp. X, 89; portrait and numerous cuts. 



[ 216 ] 

Collation: i, title; ii, copyright and imprint; iii, 
contents; iv, blank; v-viii, list of illustrations; 
ix-x, "Ave" [verse], dated Beverly Farms, 
July 24, 1884; 1-89, poems. 

Contains 28 poems, all of which had appeared in some 
previous collection. 

Issued in England with imprint of Macmillan & Co. 

Selections from the Poetical Works of 
Dr. Oliver Wendell Holmes. With a 
"Dedication," written by the Author expressly 
for this edition. Electrotyped. The Howe 
Memorial Press. Perkins Institution and Mas- 
sachusetts School for the Blind. Boston. 1885. 
4to, pp. V, 168. Printed in raised letters for 
the use of the blind. 
On page v is the "Dedication" in verse, beginning: — 
** Dear friends, left darkling in the long eclipse," 
to which no other title has ever been given than " Prelude 
to a Volume printed in Raised Letters for the Blind." The 
poems number 91. 

The Same. The Howe Memorial Press. 1885. 
4to. The same selections printed in raised 
symbols, not letters. 

Poems. By Oliver Wendell Holmes. London, 
George Routledge & Sons, Broadway, Ludgate 
Hill; New York, 9 Lafayette Place, 1886. 
12mo, pp. 384. 
Selected poems. 

Selections from the Writings of Oliver 
Wendell Holmes, arranged under the Days 
of the Year, and accompanied by Memoranda 
of Anniversaries of Noted Events, and of the 



[217] 

Birth or Death of Famous Men and Women. 
Boston and New York: Houghton, Mifflin 
& Co. The Riverside Press, Cambridge, 1887. 

24mo, pages unnumbered. 

"The Chambered Nautilus" on leaf next title; selec- 
tions begin on following leaf. 

Half-Hours with the Best American Au- 
thors. Selected and Arranged by Charles 
Morris. Philadelphia, J. B, Lippincott & Co,, 
1887. 

4 vols., 8vo. 

Vol. i, pp. 487-493, Excerpts from the "Autocrat." 

Vol. ii, pp. 434-435, "The Voiceless." 

Vol. iii, pp. 130-132, "The Chambered Nautilus." 

My Hunt after the Captain and Other 
Papers. With Notes and an Introductory 
Essay. Boston, Houghton, Mifflin & Co., 
1887. 

12mo, pp. 93. 
Riverside Literature Series, no. 31. 

Contents : — 
Dr. Holmes's Prose Writings. 
My Hunt after the Captain. 
The Physiology of Walking. 
Great Trees (from the "Autocrat")' 

The Holmes Birthday Book [Ornament] [Quo- 
tation ^] [Device]. Boston and New York, 
Houghton, Mifflin and Company. The River- 
side Press, Cambridge, [c. 1889.] 

32mo, pp. [iv], 407; portrait and plates. 
On p. [iii] is a passage from the " Poet," and the famil- 
iar portrait of Dorothy Q is reproduced opposite p. 1 of 
» Four lines from " The Iron Gate." 



[218] 

text. The selections for each month are prieceded and 
followed by a poetical quotation. On the left-hand pages 
selections from Dr. Holmes's works are assigned to the 
dajs of the month, two to each page, and on the right- 
hand pages the corresponding dates are repeated, with 
the names of famous persons who were bom on those days, 
with the year of birth. Index of persons whose births 
are so recorded, on pp. 399-407. 

Holmes Gems. Illustrated by Louis K. Harlow. 
Boston, Samuel E. Cassino, 196 Summer Street, 
1891. 

8vo. Rubricated title. 

Warner's Library of the World's Best 
Literature. Vol. xiii, pp. 7457^-7495. 

Old Ironsides. 

The Last Leaf. 

On Lending a Punch-Bowl. 

The Chambered Nautilus. 

The Deacon's Masterpiece. 

A Sun-Day Hymn. 

The Voiceless. 

Bill and Joe. 

Dorothy Q. 

The Three Professions (from the "Poet"). 

Elsie at the Sprowle Party (from Elsie Venner). 

On Rattlesnake Ledge (from Elsie Venner). 

My Last Walk with the School Mistress (from the " Auto- 
crat"). 

The Lark on Salisbury Plain (from Our Hundred Days in 
Europe). 

Holmes Year Book. London, Gay & Bird, 1895. 

The "Autocrat" Birthday Book. Being 
Selections from the Works of Oliver Wendell 
Holmes, arranged by A. L. McDonald. Lon- 
don, Sunday School Union. [1895.] 
16mo, pp. 268. 



[219] 

Selections from the Writings of Eleven 
American Authors, with Portraits and Bio- 
graphical Sketches. Boston, Houghton, Mifflin 
and Co., 1896. 
Riverside Literature Series, N. Holmes, pp. 30-36. 

Contents: — 

Biographical Sketch. 
The Chambered Nautilus. 
Robinson of Ley den. 
Departed Days. 

Grandmother's Story of Bunker Hill Battle 
and other Verse and Prose. Boston, Houghton, 
Mifflin & Co., 1896. 

12mo, pp. 1-96, and 1-93, with panel adver- 
tisement preceding frontispiece and 32 pp. 
of advertisements at end; portrait and cut. 

Published in Riverside School Library, and consists 
of Riverside Literature Series, nos. 6 and 31 (see pages 
213 and 217), bound together; each part has a half-title, 
the second bearing these vrords : " My Hunt after the 
Captain and Other Papers, with an Introductory Essay 
on Dr. Holmes's Prose Writings." 

The Wonderful " One-Hoss-Shay " (Re- 
printed from the Atlantic Monthly of Septem- 
ber, 1858) and Other Poems. With numerous 
original illustrations by C. Moore Smith. New 
York, Frederick A, Stokes Company, 1897. 
24mo, pp. 126. 

Selected Poems by Oliver Wendell Holmes. 
With Introduction and Notes by E. H. Turpin. 
New York, Maynard, Merrill & Co., 1898. 
16mo. 
Maynard's English Classic, Series, no. 205. Contains 



a biographical sketch of six pages, a ** Chronology of 
Holmes's Chief Works," and "Critical Opinions," 
together with the following poems : — 

Cambridge Churchyard. 

Old Ironsides. 

Our Yankee Girls. 

Illustration of a Picture. 

The Last Leaf. 

To an Insect. 

The Meeting of the Dryads. 

The Comet. 

The Ballad of the Oysterman. 

Lexington. 

The Music-Grinders. 

The Height of the Ridiculous. 

The Hot Season. 

The Wasp and the Hornet. 

"Qui Tive!" 

Selections from Urania. 

The Stereoscope and Stereoscopic Photo- 
graphs. Oliver Wendell Holmes. Underwood 
and Underwood, New York, London, Ottawa 
(Kansas), and Toronto, 1898. 

12mo, pp. 80. 
Contents: — 
Introduction. 
The Stereoscope and the Stereograph; first appeared in 

Atlantic Monthly, June, 1859, vol. 3, pp. 738-748. 
Sun-Painting and Sun-Sculpture; first appeared in Atlantic 

Monthly, July, 1861, vol. 8, pp. 13-19. 
Article on Stereoscopic Photographs, signed Underwood and 
Underwood. 

The One-Hoss Shay, The Chambered Nau- 
tilus, AND Other Poems, Gay and Grave. 
By Oliver Wendell Holmes. Boston and New 
York, Houghton, Mifflin & Co., 1899. 

12mo, pp. viii, 154, and 1 of advertisement 



[221] 

of the series; "Editor's Note," signed H. E. 
S[cudder] on pp. v-vi. 
Riverside Aldine Classics. 

Contents: — 

The Deacon's Masterpiece, or the Wonderful "One-Hoss 

Shay." 
Parson Turell's Legacy. 
How the Old Horse Won the Bet. 
The Broomstick Train. 
My Aunt. 

The Dorchester Giant. 
The Height of the Ridiculous. 
The Spectre Pig. 
The Ballad of the Oysterman. 
The Hot Season. 
The Stethoscope Song. 
Bill and Joe. 
Latter-Day Warnings. 
Contentment. 
De Sauty. 

Ode for a Social Meeting. 
The Archbishop and Gil Bias. 
Old Cambridge, July 3, 1875. 
Epilogue to the Breakfast-Table Series. 
The Chambered Nautilus. 
Old tonsides. 
The Last Leaf. 
The Cambridge Churchyard. 
Dorothy Q. 
The Organ-Blower. 
Agnes. 
Avis. 

A Sun-Day Hymn. 
The Crooked Footpath. 
Robinson of Ley den. 
My Aviary. 

A Ballad of the Boston Tea-Party. 
Grandmother's Story of Bunker-Hill Battle. 
The School-Boy. 
At the Saturday Club. 
The Iron Gate. 



[ m^ ] 

The Early Poems of Oliver Wendell Holmes. 
With an Introduction by Nathan Haskell 
Dole. New York, T. Y. Crowell & Co., 1899. 
16mo, pp. 325. 

The Early Poems of Oliver Wendell Holmes. 
With a Biographical Sketch by Henry Ketcham. 
New Yoris:, A. L, Burt, 1900. 
12mo, pp. 250. 
Each of the two volumes last described contains all 
the poems, and no others, that were included in the Lon- 
don (Routledge) edition of 1852. 

An American Anthology, E. C. Stedman, 1900. 
Contains the following poems of Dr. Holmes: — 
Old Ironsides. 
The Last Leaf. 
The Height of the Ridiculous. 
La Grisette. 

On Lending a Punch-Bowl. 
After a Lecture on Keats. 
The Voiceless. 
The Living Temple. 
The Chambered Nautilus. 
Bill and Joe. 
Under the Violets. 
Hymn of Trust. 

Epilogue to the Breakfast-Table Series. 
Dorothy Q. 
Cacoethes Scribendi. 
The Strong Heroic Line.^ 
From "The Iron Gate." 

Gems from Holmes. Boston, De Wolfe, Fiske 
& Co,, 1904. 

16mo. Printed in pale blue and gold, with 
decorative borders. 

* Extract from the " Poem read at the Dinner given to the Author by 
the Medical Profession of the City of New York," April 12, 1883. 



[ 223 ] 

The Chief American Poets, by Curtis Hidden 
Page. Boston and New York, Houghton, 
Mifftin & Co., 1895. 
Contains the following poems of Dr. Holmes : — 

Old Ironsides. 

The Ballad of the Oysterman. 

The Height of the Ridiculous. 

To an Insect. 

L'lnconnue. 

My Aunt. 

The Last Leaf. 

La Grisette. 

Our Yankee Girls. 

On Lending a Punch-Bowl. 

The Stethoscope Song. 

The Statesman's Secret. * 

After a Lecture on Wordsworth. 

After a Lecture on Shelley. 

The Hudson. 

To an EngHsh Friend. 

The Old Man Dreams. 

Birthday of Daniel Webster. 

For the Meeting of the Burns Club. 

Latter-Day Warnings. 

The Chambered Nautilus. 

The Living Temple. 

The Deacon's Masterpiece. 

Contentment. 

Parson Turell's Legacy. 

The Voiceless. 

For the Burns Centennial Celebration. 

The Boys. 

At a Meeting of Friends. 

The Two Streams. 

Under the Violets. 

Hymn of Trust. 

A Sun-Day Hymn. 

Prologue to Songs in Many Keys. 

Brother Jonathan's Lament for Sister Caroline. 

Parting Hymn. 



[224] 

Union and Liberty. 

J. D. R. 

To my Readers. 

Voyage of the Good Ship Union. 

Bryant's Seventieth Birthday. 

My Annual. 

AU Here. 

Bill and Joe. 

Nearing the Snow Line. 

Dorothy Q. 

Epilogue to the Breakfast-Table Series. 

Programme. 

Grandmother's Story of Bunker-Hill Battle. 

How the Old Horse Won the Bet. 

For Whittier's Seventieth Birthday. 

Veritas. 

The Silent Melody. 

The lion Gate. 

The Shadows. 

At the Saturday Club. 

The Girdle of Friendship. 

To James Russell Lowell. 

The Lyre of Anacreon. 

After the Curfew. 

La Maison d'Or. 

Too Young for Love. 

The Broomstick Train. 

Invita Minerva. 

James Russell Lbwell, 1819-1891. 

In Memory of John Greenleaf Whittier. 



[225] 

Selections from Dr. Holmes's works may be found also 
in the following collections: — 

Cyclopedia of American Literature, edited by 
Evert A. and George L. Duyckinck. New York, 
1856 ; also Supplement to same, 1866. 

Golden Leaves from the American Poets, col- 
lected by John W. S. Hows. New York, 1864. 

American Poems, 1879. 

Biographical Sketch on pp. 317-319. 

Modern American Lyrics, edited by Karl Knortz 
and Otto Dickmann. Leipzig and Boston, 1880. 

Poems of American Patriotism, chosen by J. Bran- 
der Matthews. New York, 1882. 

Library of American Literature, from the 
Earliest Settlement to the Present Time, 
edited by Edmund Clarence Stedman and Ellen 
Mackay Hutchinson. New York, 1888-1890. 
Selections in vol. vii. 

Representative Sonnets by American Poets, 
edited by Charles H. Crandall. Boston, 1890. 

Masterpieces of American Literature, edited by 
Horace E. Scudder. Boston, 1891. 

American Song, edited by Arthur B. Simonds, A. M. 
New York, 1894. 

Poems of American Patriotism, 1776-1898, selected 
by R. L. Paget. Boston, 1898. 

American Prose, edited by George Rice Carpenter. 
London and New York, 1898. 

The Treasury of American Sacred Song. London 
and New York, 1900. 



LETTERS 

Mr. Morse's biography of Dr. Holmes contains a large 
collection of his letters, including many to Mr. Motley, 
and a large proportion of those to Mr. Lowell, the orig- 
inals of which have been deposited in the Harvard Library 
by Professor Norton as a part of his valuable collection 
of Lowell manuscripts. Mr. Morse has this to say in 
his preface on the general subject of Dr. Holmes's corre- 
spondence : — 

" The fact is that letter-writing was to Dr. Holmes an 
irksome task. Except to Motley and to Lowell, during 
their absences in Europe, he very rarely wrote spontane- 
ously and in the way of friendship. His letters, it will 
be observed, were almost always written because some 
correspondent could not be left unanswered, or under 
the more or less mild compulsion of some special occa- 
sion. Therefore his letters are few. Every effort has been 
made to collect them, and the result is spread very fully 
before the reader. Nothing has been omitted which, by 
any liberality of judgment, could be supposed to have 
any interest; on the contrary, notes and letters are 
printed, which would hardly have been selected had 
there been an embarras de richesses." 

Li chapter xii of the first volume of the Life and 
Letters ("The Victim of Correspondents"), Mr. Morse 
deals with the same subject at considerable length. 

Li connection with this chapter it is interesting to read 
what Dr. Holmes has to say in his own behaK. Li an 
article in the Atlantic Monthly for January, 1886, called 
"A Cry from the Study," he writes somewhat bitterly 
concerning the correspondents who "could not be left 
unanswered." 

"I am overburdened with a correspondence which I 



[227] 

find almost unmanageable. It has reached such a point 
that I feel as if it would not be unreasonable for me to 
put out a sign bearing my name with the following addi- 
tions: — * * * Professional Correspondent, attends to 
letters on all subjects, from all persons and all quarters. 
Autographs in quantity at short notice. The Corre- 
spondent will furnish stationery without charge to all 
apphcants, in the form of envelopes addressed to him- 
self, and stamped, containing a blank sheet of paper for 
the letter or message he is to receive. All communications, 
long or short, all manuscripts, legible or illegible, all books 
and pamphlets, readable or unreadable, thankfully re- 
ceived and immediately read and criticised. The Corre- 
spondent expects no pecuniary return for the few daily 
hours consumed in this labor of love. It is more than 
enough to be told that his well-known kindness and uni- 
versally recognized genial nature have emboldened the 
writer to venture on what he (with superfluous modesty) 
calls his 'unauthorized intrusion.' The Correspondent 
would add that, if any sentence or any fragment of a 
sentence can be found in any letter of his which can be 
made use of so as to add commercial value to any pub- 
lication, it cannot be expected that the word Private 
prefixed to that letter should be considered as prevent- 
ing the recipient from giving it publicity in such form 
as may best promote his interests." 

The details that he proceeds to give concerning the 
different varieties of letter to which he was subjected, 
and concerning his habit of replying to an enormously 
large proportion of them, leave little room for doubt 
that there must be an exceedingly large number of his 
letters in existence, and, at the same time, that, in many 
cases, they are not likely to be published. 

On November 1, 1887, Dr. Holmes addressed to his 
correspondents a circular letter in these words : — 

"Dr. Holmes regrets that impaired eyesight and the 
large demands made upon his time by distant and un- 



[ 228 ] 

known friends oblige him to contract his hitherto ex- 
tended correspondence, and to avail himself of the ser- 
vices of an assistant in writing." 

Copies of this document, printed on a sheet of note 
paper, are rare and much sought after by collectors, 
especially when one of the blank pages bears, as is some- 
times the case, an autograph letter from Dr. Holmes. 

Letters on matters of public or quasi-public interest 
may be found in the following works. The list is of course 
very, very far from complete, and is offered simply for 
what it is worth. On a later page will be found some 
information concerning manuscript copies of certain 
letters which have found their way to the auction room. 

Some Account of the Letheon, or Who is the Dis- 
coverer, 1847, pp. 84-85. 

A letter to Dr. W. T. G. Morton, suggesting "Anaesthesia** 
as a name to be applied to the state produced by his new dis- 
covery, and to the agent thereof. In a second edition of the same 
year Dr. Holmes's letter is on p. 79. In this edition the sub- 
title is changed to "Who was the Discoverer." 

Report of Select Committee of House of Represent- 
atives, U. S., on the Memorial of W. T. G. Morton; 
Thirty-Second Congress, 1st Session, 1852, p. 117. 

An Account of the Pilgrim Celebration at Plymouth, 
Aug. 1, 1853, p. 136. 

Dr. Holmes's letter, dated Pittsfield, July 5, 1853, concludes 
thus: — 

"The good people of Delft, — They were known to all the rest 
of the world by their ugly mugs: but we shall always remember 
them for sending us a cargo of Chosen Vessels.^* 

Celebration of the Centennial Anniversary of the 
Introduction of the Art of Printing into New 
Hampshire, in the City of Portsmouth, Oct. 6, 1856 
(1857), pp. 54-55. 

Trials of a Public Benefactor [Dr. W. T. G. Morton], 
by Nathan P. Rice, 1859, pp. 137, 286, 312, 429. 



[229] 

Contains the letter to Dr. Morton, suggesting the name, 
" Anaesthesia," and three others relating to the Ether Contro- 
versy. 

A History of the Boston Dispensary, 1859, pp. 138- 

141. 
Proceedings on Behalf of the Morton Testimonial, 

1861. 

Fifty-Eighth Anniversary Celebration of the New 
England Society in the City of New York, Dec. 
22, 1863, pp. 45-47. 

Our Daily Fare [see p. 36], June 17, 1864, no. 9, p. 65. 
Letter written by Dr. Holmes in reply to a request of the 
Autograph Committee of the Great Western Fair at Cincinnati, 
in Dec, 1863, that he should be "funny over his own signature." 

Boston, Dee. 14, 1863. 
Dear Sir: — You ask me for a Ust of questions in Natural 
History, with answers subjoined, for the use of the instructor. I 
submit a few which, I think, will serve your purpose for the 
proposed examination of the Scientific Class: 

1. What animal produces one of its own parents ? 
Answer. The beaver, which is well known to construct its 

own dam. 

2. Is the Dodo extinct ? 

Ans. It is not, as shown by the following bill in my possession. 

Mr. — toX— , Dr. 

One mongrel goose $3.00 

One do do 3.00 

$6.00 

3. What is the largest quadruped ? 
Ans. The mole of Adrian. 

4. What is the hghtest quadruped ? 

Ans. The lynx. The lynx weighs less than an ounce. 

5. When does a horse stand on six legs ? 

Ans. When he stands on his jore legs and his two hind legs 
also. 

6. What other insect is the bee afraid of ? 
Ans. The beetle — (scare-a-bee-us). 

7. Is the otter of roses obtained from that animal when fed 
on other vegetables — cabbages for instance ? 



t 230 ] 

Ans. Probably. The musk deer furnishes his perfume when 
fed on water melons. 

8. What instance can you give of the cunning of serpents ? 
Ans. The simple fact that they secrete their venom where 

they can find it when wanted. 

9. Why do the above questions amuse you more than the 
answers ? 

Ans. Because the person who asks the questions is the querist. 

As to the other questions about which you ask my opinion, 
my answer must be brief. 

Eighteen hours' study out of twenty-four is too much, I think, 
for deHcate young persons. It does not allow sufficient time 
for sleep, recreation and meals. 

I doubt about the introduction of capital punishment as a 
part of the ordinary college discipline. It will have a good effect 
on the survivors, no doubt. 

Oliver Wendell Holmes. 

Fifty-Ninth Anniversary Celebration of the New 
England Society in the City of New York, Dec. 
15, 1864, p. 20. 

Boston, Dec. 15, 1864. 
Dear Sir: — I regret very much that my engagements render 
it impossible for me to accept the very kind invitation of the 
New England Society to be present at their annual festival. 
May I take advantage of your kindness by requesting you to 
read the following advertisement, which I hope will not fail to 
interest the children of the Pilgrims : — 

GREAT MORAL EXHIBITION 

OF 

Architectural Models 
two shows under one canvas 

No. 1. Temple of Slavery — Foundation, trap rock; base- 
ment, serpentine, with corner stone of black lava; walls, loose 
conglomerate. 

In the background — Vesuvius smoking. 

No. 2. Temple of Liberty — Foundation, Plymouth granite; 
basement. Northern freestone; walls, Jasper, from the cele- 
brated quarry of the New Jerusalem. 



[231] 

Background — Mountains of New England. 
Monadnock, Kearsarge, Wachusett. 

Tickets free to all Mankind. 

School children from the Old World monarchies and their 
masters are cordially invited. 

A. Lincoln, Manager. 
Ushers — Messrs. Grant, Sherman, Sheridan, Butler, Far- 
ragut, Winslow and others. 

N. B. — This is the last opportunity to see the complete 
double show, as model No. 1 is shortly to be taken to pieces 
and removed to make room for an extension of the Temple 
of Freedom. 

Yours, very truly and respectfully, 

O. W. Holmes. 

Sixty-Second Anniversary Celebration of the New 

England Society, Dec. 23, 1867, p. 63. 
The New Ledger Building (Philadelphia), 1867, pp. 

41-42. 

Celebration of the One Hundred and Eleventh 
Anniversary of Robert Burns' Natal Day, at 
Delmonico's Hotel, New York, Jan. 25, 1870, pp. 10-11. 
Extracts from the same letter are printed in 

Burnsiana: a Collection of Literary Odds and Ends relat- 
ing to Robert Bm*ns, compiled by John D. Ross (Paisley 
and London), 1892, vol. i, p. 72. 

Proceedings of the Massachusetts Historical Soci- 
ety, Sept. 8, 1870, vol. 11, p. 369. 
Letter on the death of John P. Kennedy. 

The Unity of Italy. The American Celebration, etc., 
Jan. 12, 1871, p. 71. 

Proceedings of the Massachusetts Historical So- 
ciety, Aug. 10, 1871, vol. 12, pp. 154-155. 

Letter concerning Sir Walter Scott. Also printed in 

Tributes to Walter Scott on the 100th anniversary of his 
birthday, by the Mass. Hist. Soc, 1871, pp. 15-16; and in 
Quarterly Review, London, April, 1872. 



[ 232 ] 

Proceedings at the Farewell Banquet to Prof. 
Tyndall, Feb. 4, 1873, pp. 25-27, 

History of the Black Bear, "Billy Bruin," ^ho 
ESCAPED FROM RiDGE HiLL Farms, Wellcslcy, Mass., 
1874, p. 15. 

The Ark, Feb. 26, 1875, vol. 1, no. 5. 

This periodical was conducted in the interest of a fair for the 
benefit of the Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals. 
Dr. Holmes's letter is headed: "Suggestive Hints from Oliver 
Wendell Holmes." The concluding paragraph is as follows: — 
"The Society must remember that even speaking animals 
have a right sometimes to plead for protection. Especially 
should the poets, or those who are commonly spoken of as such, 
be spared. The ascent of Parnassus is notoriously very diffi- 
cult, and I venture to recommend to the Society that it cause 
to be placed at the door of every bm'lding occupied by any 
association whatsoever, but more especially of every benevolent 
association, — inasmuch as all such feel that they have a right 
to call on everybody for everything, — a board with the follow- 
ing inscription : 

*' Please Spare your Poets when going up Hill." 

Semi-Centennial of the Philomathean Society, 
Phillips Academy, Andover, Mass., May 26, 1875, pp. 
73-75. 

Laurel Leaves. Original Poems, Stories and Essays, 
1876, p. vii. 

The book is dedicated to Dr. Holmes, and the letter is his 
acceptance of the compliment. 

Boston Medical and Surgical Journal, Sept. 28, 1876, 
vol. 95, pp. 393-395. 
Letter concerning Dr. John B. S. Jackson. 

Edgar Allan Poe. A Memorial Volume. By Sara S. 
Rice (Baltimore), 1877, pp. 79-80. 

Guide to the Ridge Hill Farms, Wellesley, Mass., and 
Social Science Reform, 1877, pp. 55-56. 



[233] 

Proceedings at a Reception in Honor of the Rev. 
O. B. Frothingham, by the Independent Liberal Club, 
April 22, 1879, p. 54. 

City of Boston. Report of the Joint Special Com- 
mittee ON Intramural Interments, 1879. 

Letter to the Committee, Sept. 1, 1879, in reference to inter- 
ments in King's Chapel Burial-Ground. 

Proceedings of the Two Hundred and Fiftieth Anni- 
versary OF THE First Church and Parish of Dor- 
chester, 1880, p. 170. 

Boston Medical and Surgical Journal, June 23, 1881, 
vol. 104, p. 593. 

Letter to Dr. George E. ElUs (Read at the Centennial Dinner 
of the Mass. Medical Society). 

The Sword and the Pen, Dec. 10, 1881, no. 4, p. 1. 

"A Note of Regret," dated Nov. 23, 1881. The paper was 
published in the interest of the Soldiers' Home Bazaar. 

Proceedings at a Banquet given by his Friends to 
the Hon. Marshall P. Wilder, Ph. D., on his Birth- 
day, Sept. 22, 1883, p. 101. 

Herbert Spencer on the Americans and the Ameri- 
cans ON Herbert Spencer, 1883, pp. 84-85. 

Critic, Sept. 6, 1884, n. s. vol. 2, p. 109. 

"Dr. Holmes's Reply" to the "Surprise Party" number. See 
injra, pp. 268-269. 

American Anti-Slavery Society Commemoration, 1884, 
p. 61. 

Proceedings at the Presentation of a Portrait of 
J. G. Whittier to the Friends' School, Providence, 
R. L, 10th Mo., 24, 1884 (1885). 
Letter dated July 16, 1884. 
History of the Ordination of Caleb D. Bradlee. 
Also History of the 30tii Anniversary of his 
Ordination, Dec. 11, 1854-Dec. 11, 1884. 
Letter dated Nov. 28, 1884. 



[ 234 ] 

Boston Medical and Surgical Journal, Feb. 12, 1885, 
vol. 112, pp. 165-166. 

Letter to Dr. Fordyce Barker, on his resigning the office of 
President of the New York Academy of Medicine. 

Proceedings of the Maine Historical Society on 
H. W. Longfellow's 78th Birthday, Feb. 27, 1885, 
pp. 21-22. 

Proceedings of the Dedication of the Fountain in 
Eaton Square, Ward 24, in Memory of Theodore 
Lyman, Jr., Oct. 26, 1885 (1886), p. 53. 

Recreations of the Rabelais Club, 1882-1885. 

Dr. Holmes's letter is printed as a sort of introduction to this 
second series of the "Recreations." 

A Testimonial to Charles J. Paine and Edward 
Burgess from the City of Boston, for their successful 
defence of the America's cup, 1887, p. 151. 

Correspondence of John Lothrop Motley, edited 
by G. W. Curtis, 2 vols., 1889. 

These volumes contain, besides many letters to Dr. Holmes 
from Mr. Motley, some eight or ten letters from him to Mr. 
Motley. See the Index. Also see pp. 21-22, supra. In a letter 
of Sept., 1863 (vol. ii, p. 141), Motley speaks in the warmest 
terms of Dr. Holmes's Fourth of July Oration. 

Bulletin of the New York Public Library, Nov., 
1890, vol. 4, pp. 356-357. 

New York "Pseudo-Critics " in 1850. — A letter, never before 
published, written by Dr. Holmes to E. A. Duyckinck, Nov. 9, 
1850, in reply to a criticism of "Astrsea'* in the Literary World 
for October of that year, attributed to Cornelius Matthews, 

Bulletin of the Harvard Medical School Associa- 
tion, no. 1, 1891, pp. 30-32. 

Abraham Coles: Biographical Sketch, Memorial Trib- 
utes, etc. (Jonathan A. Coles, editor), 1892, p. 46. 



[ 235 ] 

Sermons and Addresses in Recognition of the Twenty- 
fifth Anniversary of the Installation of the Rev. Alex- 
ander McKenzie. The First Church in Cambridge, 1892, 
pp. 57-58. 

Bryant Centennial at Cummington, Aug. 16, 1894, 
pp. 47-48. 

Daniel Roberts, of the Society of Friends. A Quaker 
of the Olden Time, being a memoir of John Roberts, etc. 
E. T. Lawrence, editor [London], 1898. 
Prefatory letter by Dr. Holmes. 

Passages from the Correspondence and Other Papers 
of Rufus Wilmot Griswold, 1898, p. 146. 
See supra, p. 77. 

Thoughts and Experiences in and out of School, 
by John B. Peaslee. Cincinnati, 1900, pp. 285, 287, 
293, 301, 307, 329. 

The Story of My Life. Helen A. Keller, 1903, 
Letter to Miss Keller, dated Aug. 1, 1890. 

Proceedings of the Massachusetts Historical So- 
ciety, June 9, 1904, 2d series, vol. 18, pp. 346-347. 

Letter to Dr. George E. Ellis, describing the peculiar case of 
one Mary Chase; letter dated June 3, 1881. 



DR. HOLMES'S CONTRIBUTIONS TO 
THE ATLANTIC MONTHLY 

The following list includes all of Dr. Holmes's contributions 
to the magazine with which he was, perhaps, more closely 
identified than any other person, although he was never its 
editor. The poems which were printed as parts of serials and 
of other prose articles are not hsted. 

It will be noted that of the first sixty volumes of the Atlantic, 
the only ones which contain nothing from his pen are volumes 
xviii, xxvi, xl, and xliii; and that, of the remaining thirteen 
volumes which appeared during his life (volume Ixxiii ended in 
June, 1894, and Dr. Holmes died in October), he was a con- 
tributor to seven. Surely a most exceptional record. The last 
three contributions were called forth by the deaths of three of 
his contemporaries, one of whom, at least (the first editor of the 
Atlantic), was his very dear friend. 

The story of the founding of the Atlantic has been told many 
times, and is sure to be told again, authoritatively, during the 
celebration of its fiftieth anniversary, in 1907. It is well known 
that Dr. Holmes christened the magazine.^ His connection with 
its founding was told by himself in the paper ("Dr. Holmes's 
Reminiscence") read by Mr. H. O. Houghton at the Holmes 
Breakfast in Dec, 1879 (vol. 45, supp.); also by Mr. Scudder 
in his James Russell Lowell, vol. i, p. 413, and by Mr. Morse 
in the Life and Letters of O. W. Holmes, vol. i, pp. 204 ff. 

Volume I: Nov., 1857, to May, 1858. 

The Autocrat of the Breakfast-Table, November to May. 
The Homoeopathic Domestic Physician [Review], December. 
Agassiz's Natural History [Review], January. 
Parthenia [Review], February. 

Volume II: June to Dec, 1858. 

Dr. Asa Gray's Botanical Series [Re\iew], August. 
The Autocrat of the Breakfast-Table, June to October. 

^ In the "Autocrat" (Riverside Edition, p. 55), he observes that the 
Atlantic " is not so called because it is a notion, as some dull wits wish 
they had said, but were too late.*' 



[237] 

A Visit to the Autocrat's Landlady, November. 

Brief Expositions of Rational Medicine [Review], November. 

The Last Look, November. 

The Autocrat gives a Breakfast to the Public, December. 
Volume III: Jan. to June, 1859. 

The Professor at the Breakfast-Table, January to June. 

Mothers and Infants, Nurses and Nursing [Review], May. 

The Stereoscope and the Stereograph, June. 
Volume IV: July to Dec, 1859. 

The Professor at the Breakfast-Table, July to December » 

Love [Review], September. 
Volume V: Jan. to June, 1860. 

The Professor's Story [Elsie Venner], January to June. 

The Undergraduate [Review], March. 
Volume VI: July to Dec, 1860. 

The Professor's Story [Elsie Venner], July to December. 
Volume VII: Jan. to June, 1861. 

The Professor's Story [Elsie Venner], January to April. 

A Visit to the Asylum for Aged and Decayed Punsters, January, 

Brother Jonathan's Lament for Sister CaroHne, May. 

Army Hymn, June. 
Volume VIII: July to Dec, 1861. 

Sun Painting and Sun Sculpture, July. 

Parting Hymn, August. 

Bread and the Newspaper, September. 

The Wormwood Cordial of History, October. 

The Flower of Liberty, November. 

Union and Liberty, December. 
Volume IX : Jan. to June, 1862. 

Voyage of the Good Ship Union, March. 
Volume X: July to Dec, 1862. 

The Poet to the Readers, July. 

My Hunt after the Captain, December. 
Volume XI: Jan. to June, 1863. 

Choose You this Day whom Ye will Serve, March. 

The Human Wheel, its Spokes and Felloes, May. 



[238] 

Volume XII: July to Dec, 1863. 

Doings of the Sunbeam, July. 

The Great Instrument, November. 
Volume XIII: Jan. to June, 1864. 

The Minister Plenipotentiary, January. 

The Last Charge, February. 

Our Classmate (F. W. C), March. 

Our Progressive Independence, April. 

Shakespeare, June. 
Volume XIV: July to Dec, 1864. 

Hawthorne, July. 

In Memory of J. W. — R. W., July. 

Bryant's Seventieth Birthday, December. 

Volume XV: Jan. to June, 1865. 

God Save the Flag, January. 

Our Oldest Friend, March. 

Our First Citizen (Edward Everett), April. 

Our Battle Laureate (H. H. Brownell), May. 
Volume XVI: July to Dec, 1865. 

No Time like the Old Time, October. 

A Farewell to Agassiz, November. 
Volume XVII: Jan. to June, 1866. 

My Annual, April. 
Volume XIX: Jan. to June, 1867. 

The Guardian Angel, Jan. to June. 

All Here, March. 

Volume XX: July to Dec, 1867. 

The Guardian Angel, July to December. 

Chanson without Music, November. 
Volume XXI: Jan. to June, 1868. 

Once More, April. 
Volume XXII: July to Dec, 1868. 

Bill and Joe, September. 
Volume XXIII: Jan. to June, 1869. 

Cinders from the Ashes, January. 



[ 239 ] 

Volume XXIV: July to Dec, 1869. 

Bonaparte, August 15, 1769 — Humboldt, September 14, 1769, 
November. 
Volume XXV: Jan. to June, 1870. 

Nearing the Snow-Line, January. 

Even-Song, March. 

Volume XXVII: Jan. to June, 1871. 

Dorothy Q., a Family Portrait, January. 
Volume XXVIII: July to Dec, 1871. 

Life of Major John Andre [Review], July. 
Volume XXIX: Jan. to June, 1872. 

The Poet at the Breakfast-Table, January to June. 
Volume XXX: July to Dec, 1872. 

The Poet at the Breakfast-Table, July to December. 
Volume XXXI: Jan. to June, 1873. 

After the Fire, January. 
Volume XXXII: July to Dec, 1873. 

The Foimtain of Youth, August. 

A Poem Served to Order, September. 

Sex in Education [Review], December. 
VoLU]^iE XXXni: Jan. to June, 1874. 

An Old- Year Song, January. 

A Ballad of the Boston Tea-Party, February. 
VoLUiME XXXIV: July to Dec, 1874. 

Professor Jeffries Wyman, November. 
Volume XXXV: Jan. to June, 1875. 

The Americanized European, January. 

Crime and Automatism, April. 
Volume XXXVI: July to Dec, 1875. 

Old Cambridge, August. 

Exotics, September. 

Volume XXXVII: Jan. to June, 1876. 
A Familiar letter (To Several Correspondents), January. 
"Ad Amicos," March. 
A Memorial Tribute, April. 



[ UO ] 

Volume XXXVIII: July to Dec, 1876. 

How the Old Horse Won the Bet, July. 
Volume XXXIX: Jan. to June, 1877. 

How Not to Settle It, February. 

The First Fan, June. 

Volume XLI: Jan. to June, 1878. 
My Aviary, January. 

Volume XLII: July to Dec, 1878. 

The Silent Melody, September. 
Volume XLIV: July to Dec, 1879. 

Vestigia Quinque Retrorsum, August. 
VoLUiME XLV: Jan. to June, 1880. 

The Coming Era, January. 

The Iron Gate, Supplement. 

Dr. Holmes's Reminiscence, Supplement. 
VoLUiviE XLVI: July to Dec, 1880. 

The Archbishop and Gil Bias, August. 

Benjamin Peirce: Astronomer, Mathematician, December. 
Volume XLVII: Jan. to June, 1881. 

Boston to Florence, March. 

VoLuiviE XLVIII: July to Dec, 1881. 
Post Prandial, September. 

Volume XLIX: Jan. to June, 1882. 
Before the Curfew, March. 
Our Dead Singer, June. 

Volume L: July to Dec, 1882. 

At the Summit, August. 
Volume LI: Jan. to June, 1883. 

An After-Breakfast Talk, January. 

A Loving-Cup Song, March. 

Pillow-Smoothing Authors, April. 

The Flaneur, May. 

Volume LII: July to Dec, 1883. 
King's Chapel, September. 



[ 241 ] 

Volume LIII: Jan. to June, 1884. 
At the Saturday Club, January. 
The Girdle of Friendship, March. 
Thomas Gold Appleton, June. 

Volume LIV: July to Dec, 1884. 
Ave, October. 

Volume LV: Jan. to June, 1885. 
The New Portfoho (A Mortal Antipathy), January to June. 

Volume LVI: July to Dec, 1885. 

The New Portfoho (A Mortal Antipathy), July to December. 
Two Anniversary After-Dinner Poems, August. 

Volume LVII: Jan. to June, 1886. 

The New Portfoho (A Cry from the Study), January. 
The New Portfoho (Two Occasional Poems with an Interlude), 
March. 

Volume LVITI: July to Dec, 1886. 

The New Portfoho (A Prospective Visit), July. 
Poem on the Two Hundred and Fiftieth Anniversary of the 
Foundation of Harvard University, Supplement. 

Volume UK: Jan. to June, 1887. 

Our Hundred Days in Europe, March to June. 

Volume LX: July to Dec, 1887. 

Our Hundred Days in Europe, July to October. 

Volume LXI: Jan. to June, 1888. 
After "Our Hundred Days,** January, 
Over the Teacups, March. 

Volume LXHI: Jan. to June, 1889. 
To James Russell Lowell, April. 

Volume LXY: Jan. to June, 1890. 
Over the Teacups, January to June. 

Volume LXVI: July to Dec, 1890. 
Over the Teacups, July to November. 
But One Talent, December. 



[242] 

Volume LXVni: July to Dec, 1891. 
James Russell Lowell, October. 

Volume LXX: July to Dec, 1892. 

In Memory of John Greenleaf Whittier, November. 
Volume LXXIII: Jan. to June, 1894. 

Francis Parkman, February. 



BIOGRAPHY AND CRITICISM 



BIOGRAPHIES 

Ball, James. Dr. Oliver Wendell Holmes and His Works : 
Being a Brief Biography and Critical Review. London, 
Elliot Stock, 62, Paternoster Row, 1878. 
16mo, pp. 199. 

Brown, Emma Elizabeth. Life of Oliver Wendell Holmes. 
Boston, D. Lothrop & Co. [c. 1884.] 
12mo, pp. 302; portrait. 

On p. 302 (unnumbered) is a brief and valueless bibliography. 
The portrait is shocking and the whole book is atrocious from 
a mechanical standpoint. 

Jerrold, Walter. Oliver Wendell Holmes. London, 
Swan Sonnenschein & Co.; New York, Macmillan & Co., 
1893. 
24mo, pp. vi, 144. 

*'The Iron Gate" is printed on pp. 139-142. On pp. 143-144 
is a so-called bibliography, which is simply a list of the volumes 
of the Riverside Edition, with the contents of each. Through- 
out the volume Dr. Holmes's father is called Abdiel instead of 
Abiel. 
Kennedy, William Sloane. Oliver Wendell Holmes, 
Poet, Litterateur, Scientist. Boston, S. E. Cassino & Co., 
1883. 

12mo, pp. 356; portrait. 

This voliune contains a valuable, although incomplete, bib- 
liography of Dr. Holmes's writings: Appendix II, pp. 334-350. 

Morse, John Torrey, Jr. Life and Letters of Oliver 
Wendell Holmes. Boston and New York, IloughtoUy 
Mifflin & Co., 1896. 



[244] 

2 vols., crown 8vo, pp. viii, 356, and vi, 335; portraits, 
facsimiles, and cuts. Many letters are included in these 
volumes; also a number of bits of verse not previously 
printed; see, in addition to those reprinted in the present 
compilation, pp. 66, 249, 297, and 353 of vol. i. 
Smith, J. E. A. 

The Poet among the Hills. Oliver Wendell Holmes in 
Berkshire. His Berkshire Poems; some of them now first 
published, with Historic and Descriptive Incidents con- 
cerning the Poems, the Poet, and his Literary Neigh- 
bors. His Poetic, Personal and Ancestral Relations to the 
County. Pittsfield, G. Blatchford, 1895. 

12mo, pp. 182; portraits of Holmes and Longfellow, 
and 5 full-page plates. 

This volume contains, inter alia. Dr. Holmes's speech at the 
"Jubilee Dinner" at Pittsfield, August 23, 1844 (pp. 65-66); 
his poem on the same occasion (pp. 67-68); his poem, "The 
Vision" (pp. 104-105); his speech at the Pittsfield Young 
Ladies' Institute graduating exercises, in 1849 (pp. 110-111); 
his poem on the same occasion, "A Vision of Life" (pp. 111- 
113); his "Report of the Committee on the Plowing-Match " 
at the Cattle-show of the Berkshire Agricultural vSociety, in 
1849, closing with the poem, "The Plowman," written for that 
occasion (pp. 129-133); the Dedicatory Poem of Pittsfield 
Cemetery, September 9, 1850 (pp. 140-144); his poem, "The 
New Eden," read at the anniversary dinner of the Berksliire 
Horticultural Society, September 13, 1854 (pp. 146-150); 
his poem, "Camilla," pp. 153-154; other poems, without titles 
(pp. 155-157); and letters (pp. 47, 90-93, 94). Of the poems 
mentioned, "A Vision of Life," "Camilla," and those without 
titles seem never to have been pubhshed in any collection of Dr. 
Holmes's poems. They are reprinted in the first part of this 
bibhography, under their respective titles; see supra, pp. 14, 
19, 25, 87. "The Vision," said by the author to have been 
written and used as an epilogue to a lecture on Wordsworth 
in his Lowell Institute Course on the Enghsh Poets of the Nine- 
teenth Centm-y, was first printed in the Knickerbocker Gallery, 
1855, pp. 23-26, under the title, "A Vision of the Housatonic;" 
in Songs in Many Keys, 1862, it appears under the title it has 
since retained, "After a Lecture on Wordsworth." 



[245] 

VossioN, Louis. Un Poete Americain. Oliver Wendell 
Holmes. Paris, E. Dentu. [1896.] 

Pamphlet, 8vo, pp. 26. Signed L. V., and dated at the 
end, "Philadelphie, 15 Aout, 1895." 



Such bibliographies of Holmes as have hitherto been 
published are hardly of a nature to call for listing in a 
separate category. In addition to those which are noted 
in the preceding biographies, the following may be men- 
tioned. 

Arnold, William Harris. First Editions of Bryant, 
Emerson, Hawthorne, Holmes, Eongfellow, Lowell, 
Thoreau, Whittier. Collected by WilKam Harris Arnold, 
1901. 

Boston Medical and Surgical Journal, Oct. 11, 1894, 
vol. 131, pp. 379-380. 

Bibliography of Dr. Holmes's Writings on Medical 
and Scientific Subjects. 

Foley, Patrick Kevin. American Authors, 1795-1895. 
A Bibliography of First and Notable Editions, Chrono- 
logically Arranged, with Notes, 1897, pp. 129-142. 

Livingston, Luther S. The First Books of Some Ameri- 
can Authors. II, Longfellow, Lowell, Holmes, Bryant. 
Bookman, Oct., 1898, vol. 8. Holmes on pp. 141-142. 

Page, Curtis Hidden. The Chief American Poets. Bos- 
ton, 1905. 
Bibliographical matter on p. 645. 

Stone, Herbert Stuart. First Editions of American 
Authors, 1893. 
Holmes on pp. 100-105. 



[ 246 ] 

II 

SIGNED ESSAYS, REVIEWS, etc. 

Addison, Daniel Dulany. The Clergy in American Life 
and Letters (London), 1900. 
See Index to the book. 

Allen, Alexander V. G. Life and Letters of Phillips 
Brooks, 1900, vol. ii, p. 686. 

F. M. B. With the Autocrat. 

Lippincott's Magazine, Jan., 1875, vol. 55, pp. 107-110. 

Barker, Dr. Fordtce, A Toast from, to Drs. Holmes 
and Bigelow. 

Boston Medical and Surgical Journal, Jan. 11, 1883, vol. 108, 
pp. 45-46. 

Barrows, Isabel C. Dr. Holmes and the Robin. 
Outlook, Oct. 27, 1894, vol. 50, pp. 663-664. 
Christian Register, Nov. 8, 1894, vol. 73, pp. 736-737. 

Bates, Katharine Lee. American Literature, 1898, pp. 
154-159, 227-232. 

Beers, Henry A. Initial Studies in American Letters, 
1895, pp. 136-143. 

Bellows, Albert J., M. D. Currents and Counter-Cur- 
rents in Medical Science, reviewed in an Address delivered 
before the Boston Academy of Homoeopathic Medicine. 
Pamphlet, 8vo, pp. 27. Boston, 1860. 

Bid WELL, W. H. Oliver Wendell Holmes. 

Eclectic Magazine, May, 1873, vol. 80, p. 632. 

Bolton, Sarah K. Oliver Wendell Holmes. 

Famous American Authors, 1887, pp. 133-155. 
BowEN, Francis. Urania, a Rhymed Lesson [Review]. 

North American Review, Jan., 1847, vol. 64, pp. 208-216. 



[ 247 ] 

Boyd, A. K. H. Oliver Wendell Holmes [Review of 
Morse's Life and Letters]. 
Longman's Magazine, Aug., 1896, vol. 28, pp. 344-356. 

Brunnemann, Dr. K. Geschichte der Nordamerikanischen 
Literatur [pamphlet], 1868, pp. 115-116. 

Burton, Richard. Literary Leaders of America, 1903, 
pp. 204-220. 

P. A. C. How to Study the Chambered Nautilus [A School 
of Literature]. 
Poet-Lore, Nov., 1894, vol. 6, pp. 570-576. 

Chadwick, John White. Oliver Wendell Holmes. 
Forum, Nov., 1894, vol. 18, pp. 279-287. 

. Morse's Holmes. 

Nation, June 11^ 1896, vol. 62, pp. 456-458. 

Chamberlain, Daniel H. John Lothrop Motley [Review 
of Motley's Correspondence and of Holmes's Memoir of 
Motley]. 

New Englander and Yale Review, Oct., 1890, vol. 247, pp. 
297-330. 

Cheever, David W. Oliver Wendell Holmes, the Ana- 
tomist. 

Harvard Graduates' Magazine, Dec., 1894, vol. 3, pp. 154- 
159. 

Childs, George W. Recollections, 1890, pp. 26-27. 

Clarke, H. V. 

Munsey's Magazine, vol. 7, p. 400. 

Closson, W. B. Homes and Haunts of the Poets. Holmes. 
Original Etchings. Boston, L. Prang & Co. (c. 1886.) 
Oblong 12mo. 

Portrait. 

Autograph. 

Holmes House (Cambridge). 

Study (Boston). 



[248] 

View from Study Window. 

Humility Flat, which is below Pride's Crossing (Beverly 
Farms). 

Collins, Churton. The Poetry and Poets of America. 

Cone, Helen Gray. 

Critic, Oct. 13, 1894, vol. 25, pp. 243-244. 
Cook, Keningale. American Novelists, iv. Oliver Wen- 
dell Holmes. 

Belgravia, April, 1873, vol. 20, pp. 222-232. 

Cooke, George WiiiLis. Dr. Holmes at Fourscore. 

New England Magazine, Oct., 1889, n. s. vol. 1, pp. 115- 
123. 

Cbandall, Charles H. Biographical Sketch. 

Representative Sonnets by American Poets, 1890, pp. 332- 
333. 

CuLLiNGWORTH, C. J. Oliver Wendell Holmes and the 
Contagiousness of Puerperal Fever. An address delivered 
at Marlborough, Wiltshire, to the Trowbridge division 
of the Bath and Bristol branch of the British Medical 
Association, Oct. 28, 1905. 
Svo, London, 1906. 

Curtis, George William. Oliver Wendell Holmes. 
Harper's Monthly, July, 1891, vol. 83, pp. 277-285. 
Literary and Social Essays, 1895, pp. 205-235. 

Delille, Edward. Oliver Wendell Holmes. 

Fortnightly Review, Aug., 1886, vol. 46, pp. 235-243. 

Deshler, Charles D. Afternoons with the Poets, 1879, 
pp. .308-309; including the poem " Joseph Warren.'* 

DoEHN, Dr. Rudolf. Aus dem Amerikanischen Dichter- 
wald. Literar-historische Skizzen. 
Svo, Leipzig, Otto Wigand, 1881. 

Dr. Holmes is discussed on pp. 130-132. On the title-page is 
this quotation in English : — 

"The realm of Song and Beauty 
Is the only home of Truth. 

" Charles G. Leland." 



[ 249 ] 

DwiGHT, Thomas. Reminiscences of Dr. Holmes as Pro- 
fessor of Anatomy. 
Scribner's Magazine, Jan., 1895, vol. 17, pp. 121-128. 
Fields, Annie. Oliver Wendell Holmes. 

Warner's Library of the World's Best Literature, vol. xiii, 
pp. 7457-7462. 

. Oliver Wendell Holmes. Personal Recollections and 

L^npublished Letters. 
Century Magazine, Feb., 1895, n. s. vol. 27, pp. 505-516. 
Authors and Friends, 1896, pp. 107-155. 

FiNDLAY, William, M. D. Dr. Oliver Wendell Holmes. 

Robert Burns and the Medical Profession (London), 1898 
pp. 107-110; with extracts from the Burns Centennial poem. 

Fisher, Mary. Oliver Wendell Holmes (1809-1894). 

General Survey of American Literature, 1899, pp. 260-275. 

Foster, Margaret. 

Hand-Book of American Literature (London), 1854, pp 
82-84. 

H. L. G. Oliver Wendell Holmes. 

Dubhn University Magazine, Sept., 1874, vol. 84, pp. 376-382 

Gannett, W. G. Outlines for a Study of Oliver Wendell 
Holmes. 

OutHne Studies in Holmes, Bryant, Whittier, 1887, pp. 3-8 
(Unity Club Leaflets). 

Studies in Longfellow, Whittier, Holmes, and Lowell, 1898, 
pp. 63-74 (Riverside Literature Series, no. 12). 

Gilder, Jeannette L. A Book and its Story. The 
Genial ** Autocrat " [Review of Morse's Life and Letters]. 
Critic, May 9, 1896, vol. 28, pp. 325-327. 

GiLMAN, Arthur. Oliver Wendell Holmes. 

Harvard Register, April, 1881, vol. 3, pp. 185-188. 

Gosse, Edmund. An English View of the "Autocrat." 

Critic, Dec. 1, 1894, vol. 25, pp. 382-383 (from the St. James 
Gazette). 



[250] 

Green, R. F. Oliver Wendell Holmes: Ms writings and 
philosophy. 

Proceedings Lit. and Phil. Soe., Liverpool, 1880-81, vol. 35, 
pp. 215-247. 

Griswold, Hattie Tyng. Oliver Wendell Holmes. 
Home-Life of Great Authors, 1888, pp. 251-261. 

Griswold, Rufus Wilmot. 

The Prose Writers of America, second edition, 1870, sup- 
plement, pp. 620-622. 

Hale, Edward Everett. An Afternoon with Dr. 
Holmes. 
McClure's Magazine, May, 1893, vol. 1, pp. 99. 
Human Documents, 1895. 

. Oliver Wendell Holmes (including letters from 

friends of Dr. H.). 
Critic, Oct. 13, 1894, vol. 25, pp. 242-246. 

. Impressions of Dr. Holmes. 

Outlook, Oct. 20, 1894, vol. 50, pp. 622-623. * 

-. Oliver Wendell Holmes. 

Review of Reviews, Nov., 1894, vol. 10, pp. 495-501. 

. Personal Recollections of Oliver Wendell Holmes. 

Arena, Dec, 1895, vol. 15, pp. 21-28. 

Hale, Enoch. Boylston Prize Dissertations for the years 
1836 and 1837 [Review]. 
North American Review, July, 1838, vol. 47, pp. 161-177. 

Hapgood, Norman. Oliver Wendell Holmes. 

American Prose, edited by George Rice Carpenter, 1898, 
pp. 303-307. 

Hart, Ernest. Notes of a Conversation with Oliver Wen- 
dell Holmes, Sept. 13, 1893. 

British Medical Journal, Oct. 13, 1894, vol. 2 of th^t year, 
pp. 833-834. 

Hatfield, Edwin F. Poets of the Church, 1884, pp. 335- 
338. 
The "Hymn of Trust" is included. 



[ 251 ] 

HiGGiNsoN, Thomas Wentworth, Cheerful Yesterdays, 
1898; see Index. 

. Contemporaries, 1899; see Index. 

. Old Cambridge, 1900, pp. 73-108. 

. Henry Wadsworth Longfellow (American Men of 

Letters Series), 1902, pp. 194, 287; and see Index. 

HiGGiNsoN, Thomas Wentworth, and Henry Walcott 
BoYNTON. A Reader's History of American Literature, 
1903, pp. 154-160. 

Hodge, Hugh L., M. D. On the Non-Contagious Character 
of Puerperal Fever: An Introductory Lecture, delivered 
Monday, Oct. 11, 1852. Philadelphia, C. K. & P. G. 
Collins, 1852. 

Pamphlet, 8vo, pp. 52. 

See Medical Essays, pp. 109-110, and Morse's Life and Let- 
ters, vol. i, p. 164. Dr. Holmes is not mentioned by name. 

HOdgkins, Louise Manning. A Guide to the Study of 
Holmes, 1888, pp. 12 (unpaged). 

Howe, Julia Ward. Reminiscences (1819-1899), 1899, 
pp. 277-280. 

Howe, Mark Antony DeWolfe. American Bookmen, 
XII. Longfellow and Holmes. 
Bookman, May, 1898, vol. 7, pp. 217-228. 
American Bookmen, 1898, pp. 265-286. 

HowELLs, William Dean. Mechanism in Thought and 
Morals [Review]. 
Atlantic Monthly, May, 1871, vol. 27, pp. 653-654. 

. The Poet at the Breakfast-Table [Review]. 

Atlantic Monthly, Dec, 1872, vol. 30, pp. 745-746. 

. Songs of Many Seasons [Review]. 



Atlantic Monthly, Jan., 1875, vol. 35, pp. lO-'J-lOG. 

-. The School-Boy [Review]. 
Atlantic Monthly, Jan., 1879, vol. 43, pp. 120-121. 



[ 252 ] 

HowELLS, William Dean. Oliver Wendell Holmes. 

Harper's Monthly, Dec, 1896, vol. 94, pp. 120-134. 
. Oliver Wendell Holmes. Literary Friends and Ac- 
quaintance, 1900, pp. 146-177. 
Hughes, James L. An Hour with Oliver Wendell Holmes. 
Canadian Magazine of Politics, Science, Art, and Literature, 
Dec, 1893, vol. 2, pp. 134-141; with portrait and facsimiles. 
Hughes, Sarah Forbes. Letters and Recollections of 
John Murray Forbes, 1899, vol. i, pp. 34-35; vol. ii, 
pp. 159-160. 

On p. 35 of vol. i, is a poem — " To J. M. F. on his Eightieth 
Birthday, February 23, 1813-February 23, 1893" — apparently 
not before published. See p. 80, supra. 

Ingham, John H. The Poetical Works of Oliver Wendell 
Holmes. 
Academy, Jan. 7, 1882, vol. 21, pp. 4-5. 

"Jehu Junior." Men of the Day. No. ccclxii. Dr. 
Oliver Wendell Holmes. With burlesque portrait. 
Vanity Fair (London), June 19, 1886. 
"Born seven and seventy years ago at Cambridge, Massachu- 
setts, he took his degree at the age of twenty from Harvard 
University, and devoted himself to the study of the Law. But 
after a few months he found that the Law bored him, and he 
determined to follow Medicine. He accordingly came to Eu- 
rope, walked the Paris Hospitals, took various medical degrees, 
and on his return to his native land, married, became the fash- 
ionable Boston doctor, and took to Literature; and, although 
he has filled for five and thirty years, to the great delight of 
the students and the amazement of his brother Professors, 
the Chair of Anatomy at Harvard, it is to literature that he 
belongs. 

*' He has written a great many books. His poems are quite 
harmless and full of common sense and flippancy. They range 
from Commemoration Odes to Valentines, and are excellent 
examples of what poetry ought not to be. His novels are an 
artistic combination of romance and physiology. They are very 
fantastic, very imaginative, and read like the conversation of 
a medical student in love. His essays are a sort of INIontaigne 



[ 253 ] 

for families, and can be highly recommended. He is the last 
of the laughing philosophers, and the author of the wise maxim, 
' Give me the luxuries of life, and I will do without its neces- 
saries.* His style scintillates with wit, and, when it is at its 
best, has all the charm of an exploding cracker. His chief qual- 
) ity is his wonderful versatility. When he writes poetry, he is a 
I professor. When he lectures on anatomy, he is a poet. His 
i novels are the notebooks of a physician; and his philosophy 
I is the kindly observation of a man of the world, the wisdom of 
* one who has dined well. 

J "Personally, he is a brisk, dapper little man, very brilliant 
and very bright-eyed; a Puck without malice, an Ariel with a 
sense of humour. He is very much loved by all who know him, 
for he has a wholesome dread of people who impart useful in- 
formation, and thinks that serious conversation is a form of 
solemn trifling. Attic wit, Yankee humour, a very large supply 
of human nature, and an absence of any ambition to be presi- 
dent, have made him the most popular man in America. He 
has been made much of recently in London Society, and has 
delighted the Duchesses, for, unlike many Society lions, he has 
the most genial manners and no mane. On the whole, he is a 
great success. Though a Bostonian, he is not a prig; though 
a brilliant conversationalist, he can listen; and though seventy- 
seven years of age, he is still a very young man." 

According to Mr. Morse nobody appreciated the very clever 
caricature, which this text accompanied, more thoroughly than 
Dr. Holmes himself. 

Johnson, Edward Gilpin. The Prose Writings of Oliver 
Wendell Holmes [Review of vols, i-vi of Riverside Edi- 
tion]. 
Dial, Nov., 1891, vol. 12, pp. 209-211. 

. [Review of Morse's Life and Letters.] 

Dial, May 16, 1896, vol. 20, pp. 299-302. 

Kneeland, Sam'l, Jr., M. D. On the Contagiousness of 
Puerperal Fever, and its Connection with Epidemic 
Erysipelas. Boston, 1856. 
Pamphlet, Bvo, pp. 19. 

Dr. Holmes's essay is frequently cited with approval, espe- 
cially on pp. 7-10. 



[ 254 ] 

Lamont, a. Oliver Wendell Holmes. His Touch with 
Nature and Humanity. 
Sunday Magazine, Sept., 1889, vol. 18, pp. 588-595. 

Lang, Andrew. Adventures among Books, 1905, pp. 79- 
96. 

Lathrop, George Parsons. The Iron Gate, and Other 
Poems. 
Atlantic Moothly. Nov., 1880, vol. 46, p. 705. 

Lawrence, Eugene. A Primer of American Literature, 
1880, pp. 104-105, 109. 

Lawton, William Cranston. Introduction to the Study 
of American Literature, 1902, pp. 215-224. 

. Holmes's The Last Leaf. , 

The New England Poets, 1898, pp. 232-254. 
Le Baron, Grace. In the Autocrat's Library. 

National Magazine, Dec., 1896, vol. 5, pp. 231-236. With 
portrait and photograph of library. 

Lewin, Walter. A Mortal Antipathy, etc. [Review]. 
Academy, Jan. 16, 1886, vol. 29, p. 37. 

. OKver Wendell Holmes. 

Academy, Oct. 13, 1894, vol. 46, p. 279. 

Lodge, Henry Cabot. Dr. Holmes. 

North American Review, Dec, 1894, vol. 159, pp. 669-677. 
Certain Accepted Heroes and Other Essays, 1897, pp. 135- 
154. 

Longfellow, Samuel. Life of Henry Wadsworth Long- 
fellow, with Extracts from his Journal and Correspond- 
ence, 3 vols., 1886; see Index. 

LovEJOY, George Newell. Lunch with Dr. Holmes. 

Author, Nov. 15, 1889, vol. 1, pp. 167-169 (from the Chicago 
Tribune). 

Lowell, James Russell. A Fable for Critics. 

Poems, Riverside Edition, vol. iii, pp. 84-85. 
. Elsie Venner [Review]. 

Atlantic Monthly, April, 1861, vol. 7, pp. 509-511. 



[^55] 

Lowell, James Russell. Letters, 2 vols., New York, 
1894; the same, 3 vols., Boston, 1904. Edited by Charles 
Eliot Norton. 
These volumes contain many letters to Dr. Holmes. 

Lowell, Percival. Oliver Wendell Holmes. 

Proceedings of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, 
May 8, 1895, vol. 30, pp. 555-562. 

Ludlow, J. M. Elsie Venner and Silas Marner: a Few 
Words on Two Noteworthy Novels. 
Macmillan's Magazine, Aug., 1861, vol. 4, pp. 305-309. 

Macrae, David. Oliver Wendell Holmes in 1864. 

Pen Pictures of Modern Authors (The Literary Life, n), 
William Shepard, editor, pp. 144-149. 

Matthews, Brander. An Litroduction to the Study of 
American Literature, 1896 (illustrated), pp. 170-183. 

Matthews, Cornelius [?]. Review of "Astrsea." 
Literary World, Oct. 26, 1850. 
See "New York * Pseudo-Critics * in 1850," supray p. 234. 

May, Samuel. Dr. Holmes with his Classmates. 

Harvard Graduates' Magazine, Dec, 1894, vol. 3, pp. 159- 
162. 

Meigs, Charles D., M. D. On the Nature, Signs, and 
Treatment of Childbed Fevers, in a Series of Letters 
addressed to the Students of his Class. Philadelphia, 
Blanchard & Lea, 1854. 

See Medical Essays, pp. 110 ff., and Morse's Life and Letters, 
vol. i, p. 164. The contagiousness of puerperal fever is dis- 
cussed in the Sixth Letter, and Dr. Holmes's name is mentioned 
rather slightingly on p. 93. See also pp. 99-100. The " un- 
palatable expression " referred to by Dr. Holmes in the intro- 
duction to the reprint of his essay on that subject (Medical 
Essays, p. 110) occurs on p. 113. See Appendix, p. 313, infra. 

Merrill, George B. Oliver Wendell Holmes. A paper 
read at the Twenty-First Annual Dinner of the Harvard 
Club of San Francisco, Oct. 18, 1894. 
Pamphlet, 8vo, pp. 27. 



[256] 

Mitchell, Donald Grant (Ik Marvel). Poet and Pro- 
fessor; as autocrat. 
American Lands and Letters, 1899, vol. ii, pp. 331-364. 

MiTFORD, Mary Russell. American Poets. Oliver Wen- 
dell Holmes. 
Recollections of a Literary Life, 1858, pp. 399-410. 

Morse, James Herbert. Oliver Wendell Holmes. 
Critic, April 28, 1883, vol. 3, pp. 191-192. 

Morse, John Torrey, Jr. Memoir of Oliver Wendell 
Holmes, D. C. L. 

Proceedings of the Massachusetts Historical Society, 1897, 2d 
series, vol. 11, pp. 47-66. 

Morse, Mary Blake. Letters of Dr. Holmes to a Class- 
mate. 
Century Magazine, Oct., 1897; n. s. vol. 32, pp. 946-949. 

MouLTON, Louise Chandler [Review of Morse's Life 
and Letters]. 
Bookman, July, 1896, vol. 3, pp. 417-420. 

Neidhard, Charles, M. D. An Answer to the Homoeo- 
pathic Delusions of Dr. Oliver Wendell Holmes. Kd-n-vov 
(TKids ovap. By Charles Neidhard, M. D. Ovk 6vap dAA' 
vTrap. Philadelphia, 1842. 
Pamphlet, Svo, pp. 36. 

"When I published my lectures on Homoeopathy and its Kin- 
dred Delusions, I had three formal pamphlets, besides miscel- 
laneous newspaper squibs, launched at my head — from Boston, 
Providence, and Philadelphia." — O. W. H. to Dr. J. C. War- 
ren, April 14, 1873, quoted in Morse's Life and Letters, vol. i, 
^ p. 350. 

The three pamphlets were Dr. Neidhard*s, Dr. Okie's, and 
Dr. Wesselhoeft's. 

Newcomer, A. G. American Literature, 1901, pp. 230-241. 

Nichol, John. American Literature ; an Historical Sketch 
[Edinburgh], 1882, pp. 249-250, 357-361, 407-411. 



[257] 

Noble, James Ashcroft. Oliver Wendell Holmes. 
Leisure Hour, Dec, 1894, vol. 44, pp. 82-88. 
Impressions and Memories, 1895, pp. 19-35. 

Okie, A. H., M. D. Homceopathy : with particular refer- 
ence to a Lecture by O. W. Holmes, M. D. Providence, 
1842. 

Onderdonk, James L. History of American Verse (1610- 
1897), 1901, pp. 268-279; and see Index. 

OsLER, William. Oliver Wendell Holmes. 
Johns Hopkins Hospital Bulletin, Oct., 1894. 
Reprinted in pamphlet form, 8vo, pp. 10. 

Oswald, Felix L. Dr. Oliver Wendell Holmes's Health 
Code. 

Chautauquan, Dec, 1894, vol. 20, pp. 321-325. 
Page, Curtis Hidden. Biographical Sketch. 

The Chief American Poets, 1905, pp. 677-679. 

Palfrey, John G. Poems by Oliver Wendell Holmes 
[Re\4ew of 1st edition]. 
North American Review, Jan., 1837, vol. 44, pp. 275-277. 

. Urania [Review]. 

North American Review, Jan., 1847, vol. 64, pp. 208-216. 
Palmer, Ray. Oliver Wendell Holmes. 

International Review, May, 1880, vol. 8, pp. 501-514. 
Pancoast, Henry S. 

An Introduction to American Literature, 1900, pp. 211-218. 
Payne, W. M. Little Leaders, 1895. 
Pennell, Elizabeth Robins. 

Atlantic Monthly, March, 1905, vol. 95, pp. 312-313 ("A 
Bundle of Old Letters"). 

Charles Godfrey Leland, 1906; see Index. 

Phelps, Elizabeth Stuart. 

McClure*s Magazine, vol. 7, p. 114. 



[258] 

Porter, Maria S. Oliver Wendell Holmes. 

Bostonian, June, 1895, vol. 2, pp. 243-253; with portrait and 
facsimiles. 

Prothero, R. E. Oliver Wendell Holmes. 

Longman's Magazine, July, 1886, vol. 8, pp. 300-306. 

Putnam, Alfred Porter, editor. Oliver Wendell Holmes. 
Singers and Songs of the Liberal Faith, 1875, pp. 252-261. 
(Biog. sketch, pp. 252-253; poems, 254-261.) 

Putnam, James Jackson. A Memoir of Dr. James Jack- 
son, with Sketches of his Father, etc. Boston and New 
York, Houghton, Mifftin & Co., 1905. 
See Index for references to Dr. Holmes, letters, etc. 

Richardson, Charles F. 

A Primer of American Literature, 1878, pp. 58-60. 
American Literature, 1607-1885 (1889), vol. ii, pp. 204-218. 

RiDEiNG, William H. Holmes in Cambridge and Boston. 
Chautauquan, Oct., 1887, vol. 8, pp. 15-16. 
Boyhood of Living Authors, 1887, pp. 1-15. 

Roe, Alfred S. American Authors and their Birthdays; 
Programmes and Suggestions for the Celebration of the 
Birthdays of Authors, 1887, pp. 22-28. 
Riverside Literature Series, A. 

Rollins, Alice Wellington. Authors at Home, iv. Dr. 
Oliver Wendell Holmes in Beacon St. 
Critic, Jan. 3, 10, 1885, vol. 6, pp. 1-2, 13-14. 
Authors at Home (Jeannette L. and Joseph B. Gilder), 1888, 
pp. 163-179. 

Sanborn, Franklin B. Oliver Wendell Holmes. 

Homes and Haunts of Our Elder Poets, R. H. Stoddard, 
editor, 1881, pp. 137-162; with portrait and facsimiles. 

Saunders, Frederic. Famous Books, 1887, pp. 196-197. 

Savage, Minot Judson. The Religion of Holmes's 
Poems. 



[ 259 ] 

Unity Pulpit, Oct. 19, 1894, vol. 16, no. 3.^ 
Arena, Dec, 1894, vol. 11, pp. 41-54. 

ScHURZ, Carl. Reminiscences of a Long Life. 
McClure's Magazine, Jan., 1907, vol. 28, p. 259. 

ScuDDER, Horace E. Ralph Waldo Emerson [Review]. 
Atlantic Monthly, March, 1885, vol. 55, pp. 416-417. 

. Our Hundred Days in Europe [Revievs^]. 

Atlantic Monthly, Dec, 1887, vol. 60, pp. 851-852. 

. Biographical Sketch. 

Masterpieces of American Literature, 1891, pp. 65-67. 

. Dorothy Q [Revievr]. 

Atlantic Monthly, Jan., 1893, vol. 71, p. 124. 

. Dr. Holmes. 

Atlantic Monthly, Dec, 1894, vol. 74, pp. 831-834. 

. Biographical Sketch. 

Poems, Cambridge Edition, 1895, pp. xi-xxi. 

James Russell Lowell. A Biography, 1899, vol. i, 



pp. 248-249, 251-252, 413, 426, 448; vol. ii, pp. 83, 365; 
and see Index. 
SiMONDs, Arthur B. Introduction. 
American Song, 1894, pp. 91-94. 

Smalley, George W. Oliver Wendell Holmes. 
Studies of Men, 1895, pp. 314-333. 

Smith, Samuel F. OKver Wendell Holmes. 

Harvard Graduates' Magazine, Dec, 1894, vol. 3, p. 153. 

Stearns, Frank Preston. Dr. Holmes. 
Cambridge Sketches, 1905, pp. 142-161. 

Stedman, Arthur. Biographical Sketch. 

Library of American Literature, E. C. Stedman and Ellen 
M. Hutchinson, editors, 1890, vol. xi, p. 529. 

Stedman, Edmund Clarence. Poets of America, 1885, 
pp. 273-303. 

^ On pp. 19-20 is the letter sent by Dr. Holmes to be read at the 
Whittier Commemoration at the B. Y. M. C. U., May 28, 1894. See 
p. 198, sujyra. Mr. Savage quotes a number of the poems. 



[260] 

Stephen, Leslie. Oliver Wendell Holmes [Review of 
Morse's Life and Letters of Dr. Holmes]. 
National Review, July, 1896, vol. 27, pp. 626-641. 
Littell's Living Age, Aug. 1, 1896, vol. 210, pp. 259-269. 
Eclectic Magazine, Sept., 1896, vol. 127, pp. 359-369. 
Studies of a Biographer, 1898, vol. ii, pp. 160-195. 

Stewart, George, Jr. Oliver Wendell Holmes. 

BeKord's Monthly Magazine, Feb., 1877, vol. 1, pp. 371-390. 
Evenings in the Library (Toronto), 1878, pp. 52-73. 

. Oliver Wendell Holmes. 

Arena, July, 1891, vol. 4, pp. 129-141. 

Essays from Reviews (Quebec), 1892, pp. 109-138. 

Mr. Stewart was a frequent correspondent of Dr. Holmes. 
Mr. S. H. Wakeman has in his collection an interesting auto- 
graph letter to Mr. S., concerning the two sonnets written for 
the meeting of the Harvard Club of New York in February, 
1878. See p. 32, supra. 

Sweeney, Helen M. Tennyson and Holmes ; a parallel. 
CathoHc World, Jan., 1895, vol. 60, pp. 521-534. 

Taylor, Bayard. Oliver Wendell Holmes [Review of 
Poems, Household Edition, 1877]. 
Critical Essays and Literary Notes, 1897, pp. 301-302. 

Thompson, Alice Meynell. Dr. Oliver Wendell Holmes. 
The Rhythm of Life and Other Essays, 1897 (6th edition), 
pp. 60-67." 

Trent, William P. A History of American Literature, 
1903, pp. 419-428; and see Index. 

This book is published in the series Short Histories of the 
Literatures of the World, edited by Edmund Gosse. 

Trowbridge, John Townsend. My Own Story: with 
Recollections of Noted Persons, 1903; see Index. 

Underwood, Francis H. Oliver Wendell Holmes. 
Scribner's Monthly, May, 1879, vol. 18, pp. 117-127. 
Good Words, 1887, vol. 28, pp. 298-304. 



[ 261 ] 

Vaille, Frederick Ozni, and Clark, Henry Allen. 
Oliver Wendell Holmes. 
Harvard Book, 1875, vol. i, pp. 253-254. 

Vedder, Henry C. American Writers of To-Day, 1895; 
see Index. 

Vincent, Leon H. Oliver Wendell Holmes. 
American Literary Masters, 1906, pp. 335-355. 

Walsh, William Shepard. Lowell and Holmes. 
Pen Pictures of Modern Authors, 1882, pp. 135-149. 

Wendell, Barrett. A Literary History of America, 1900, 
pp. 407-424. 

Wesselhoeft, Robert. Some Remarks on Dr. O. W. 
Holmes's Lectures on Homoeopathy and its Kindred 
Delusions, communicated to a friend : " Many are called, 
but few are chosen." Boston, 1842. 
Pamphlet, Svo, pp. 59. 
Contains 17 letters and an appendix. 

Whipple, Edwin P. [Review of Griswold's Poets and 
Poetry of America]. 
North American Review, Jan., 1844. 
Essays and Reviews, 1848. 

■ . Currents and Counter-Currents in Medical Science 

[Review]. 
Atlantic Monthly, Aug., 1861, vol. 8, pp. 253-254. 

. American Literature, and Other Papers, 1887, pp. 



76-78. 

Whittier, John Greenleaf. Mirth and Medicine [Re- 
view of Poems, 1849]. 

Littell's Living Age, March 17, 1849, vol. 20, pp. 51&-518 
(from the National Era). 

Literary Recreations, 1854, pp. 143-153. 

Prose Works (Riverside Edition), vol. iii, pp. 374-382. 



[ 262 ] 

Whittier, John Greenleaf. Oliver Wendell Holmes. 
Critic, Aug. 30, 1884. 
Prose Works (Riverside Edition), vol. ii, pp. 309-311. 

Wilson, James Grant. Dr. Holmes and Old Ironsides. 
Bookman, May, 1904, vol. 19, pp. 315-317. 

WooDBERRY, George Edward. Before the Curfew, and 
Other Poems [Review]. 
Atlantic Monthly, July, 1888, vol. 62, pp. 123-125. 

. Oliver Wendell Holmes. 

Nation, Oct. 11, 1894, vol. 59, pp. 264-265. 

. America in Literature, 1903, pp. 108-109. 



Wright, Henrietta Christian. Children's Stories in 
American Literature (1660-1860), 1895, Series II, pp. 
234-249. 



[263] 



III 

ESSAYS, REVIEWS, AND OTHER ANONYMOUS 
ARTICLES, ARRANGED IN CHRONOLOGICAL 
ORDER 

Review of the Laurel; a Gift for All Seasons, 1836. 

Knickerbocker, or New York Monthly Magazine, Feb., 1836, 
vol. 7, p. 219. 

"The Last Leaf" was printed in the Laurel, and a few lines 
of the review are devoted to that poem. 

American Monthly Magazine, March, 1836, n. s. vol. 1, pp. 
305-309. 

"The Last Leaf" and "Old Ironsides" are reviewed on 
pp. 306-307. 

Review of Poems, 1836. 

American Monthly Magazine, Jan., 1837, n. s. vol. 3, pp. 73- 
78. 

Nearly the whole review is devoted to "Poetry: a Metrical 
Essay." 

The Token and Atlantic Souvenir, 1838 [Review]. 

American Monthly Magazine, Nov., 1837, n. s. vol. 4, pp. 486- 
488. 

"The Only Daughter," which was first printed in this issue of 
the Token, is criticised rather severely. 

Position and Prospects of the Medical Student 
[Review]. 

Graham's Magazine, May, 1844, vol. 24, p. 240. 

Holmes in England : a London Edition of his Poems. 
Knickerbocker Magazine, Dec, 1845, vol. 26, pp. 570-573. 

Review of Poems (London), 1846. 

Graham's Magazine, Jan., 1846, vol. 28, p. 48. 



[ 264 ] 

Dr. Holmes's Introductory Lecture as' Parkman 
Professor, Nov. 3, 1847. 

Boston Medical and Surgical Journal, Dec. 8 and 15, 1847, 
vol. 37, pp. 384, 408. 
Review of Poems, 1849. 

North American Review, Jan., 1849, vol. 68, pp. 201-203. 
"On Lending a Punch-Bowl" is given in fuU. 
Graham's Magazine, Jan., 1849, vol. 34, pp. 82-83. 
Littell's Living Age, Jan. 6, 1849, vol. 20, p. 47. 

AsTR-^A [Review]. 

Graham's Magazine, Dec, 1850, vol. 37, pp. 385-386. 
The poem is called " Astrsea : the Balance of Delusions." 
AsTRiEA: Oliver Wendell Holmes. By a New Con- 
tributor. 
Kiiickerbocker Magazine, Feb., 1851, vol. 37, pp. 142-151. 
American Authorship, vi. By Sir Nathaniel. Oliver 
Wendell Holmes. 

Colburn's New Monthly Magazine, Sept., 1853, vol. 99, pp. 
77-84. 

Littell's Living Age, Oct. 8, 1853, vol. 39, pp. 100-104. 

The article concludes thus: "On the whole, here we have, in 
the words of a French critic, *un poete d'elite, et qui conte: 
c'est une nature individuelle tres-fine et tres-marquee ' — one 
to whom we owe ' des vers gracieux et aimables, vifs et legers, 
d'une gaiete nuancee de sentiment.' And one that we hope 
to meet again and again." 
Oliver Wendell Holmes. 

Eclectic Magazine, Dec, 1853, vol. 30, pp. 532-536. 
Oliver Wendell Holmes. 

National Magazine (New York), Dec, 1853, vol. 3, pp. 502- 
507. 
The Poets of America. 4. The Poetical Works of 
Oliver Wendell Holmes, London, 1852. 

Irish Quarterly Review, June, 1855, vol. 5, pp. 215-220. 

Gives an extract from "Poetry;" also "The Star and the 
Water-Lily," "The Last Leaf," "My Aunt," "Evening," and 
"The Stethoscope Song." 



Conversation Holmes [Review of the Autocrat of the 
Breakfast-Table]. 
Chambers's Journal, Jan. 22, 1859, vol. 11, pp. 59-61. 
Review of the Autocrat of the Breakfast-Table. 
Littell's Living Age, March 5, 1859, vol. 60, pp. 630-632 
(from the Economist). 

American Humour [" Autocrat " and " Professor "] . 
North British Review, Nov., 1860, vol. 33, pp. 476-479. 

The Professor's Story [Review]. 

Boston Review, July, 1861, vol. 1, pp. 384-398. 

Dr. Oliver Wendell Holmes and Elsie Venner. 

National Review, July, 1861, vol. 13, pp. 359-372. 

Littell's Living Age, Dec. 7, 1861, vol. 71, pp. 435-442. 
Dr. Holmes's Introductory Lecture. 

Boston Medical and Surgical Journal, Nov. 14, 1861, vol. Q5y 
pp. 318-319. 

Songs in Many Keys. 

Harvard Magazine, Dec, 1861, vol. 8, pp. 151-160. 

The writer of this article, presumably an undergraduate, deals 
very severely with Dr. Holmes's poetical talent. He says, 
among other things, "The present volume is significantly 
entitled 'Songs in Many Keys,' — indeed in almost every 
key but the right one, which it would be hard to find any- 
where in the book. . . . 

"If a young man has a right to speak critically of an older 
man, we should say that Mr. Holmes writes too much and 
writes too hastily, and that the greedy lust after the news- 
paper reputation of to-day is but too dearly gratified in the 
utter wreck of all literary hopes for the future." 

A Batch of Last Year's Novels [Review of Elsie Venner]. 
Dublin University Magazine, April, 1862, vol. 59, pp. 401- 
404. 

Review of Blue and Gold Edition of Poems, 1862. 

Harvard Magazine, Oct., 1862, vol. 9, p. 71. 
Review of Holmes's Currents and Counter-Currents 
in Medical Science. 

Boston Review, Nov., 1862, vol. 2, pp. 583-589. 



[266] 

[Dr. Holmes's Introductory Lecture.] 

Boston Medical and Surgical Journal, Nov. 13, 1862, vol. 67, 
p. 307. 

Verse, Poetry and O. W. Holmes. 

Knickerbocker, March, 1863, vol. 61, pp. 189-193. 
This is rather a severe review of the Blue and Gold Edition 
of the poems. The reviewer's text is: "his so-called poew5 are 
only verses.'^ 

Oliver Wendell Holmes. 

Sketches of Distinguished American Authors represented in 
Darley's New National Picture, entitled Washington Irving 
and his Literary Friends at Sunnyside, 1863, p. 50. 

Scholastic and Bedside Teaching, commented on. 

Boston Medical and Surgical Journal, Nov. 7, 1867, and Jan. 
9, 1868, vol. 77, pp. 298, 479-483. 

The Guardian Angel [Review]. 

Nation, Nov. 14, 1867, vol. 5, pp. 390-391. 
"Your kind womanly words affect me more gratefully perhaps 
on account of the stinging phrases which have been made for 
me by a writer in the Nation, whose aim from the first seems 
to have been to wound if possible, to injure at any rate. I 
suppose I know who he is, and only wonder how he came to 
take me for his souffre-douleur.'' — O. W. H. to Harriet Beecher 
Stowe, Nov. 17, 1867, quoted in Morse's Life, vol. ii, p. 223. 

The Guardian Angel [Review]. 

Every Saturday, Dec. 7, 1867, vol. 4, pp. 72^-730. 

American Humour. [3] The Autocrat of the Break- 
fast-Table. 
British Quarterly Review, Oct., 1870, vol. 52, pp. 324-351. 

Oliver Wendell Holmes. 

Every Saturday, Dec. 30, 1870, vol. 11, p. 642. 

The Poet at the Breakfast-Table [Review]. 
Spectator, Nov. 23, 1872, vol. 45, pp. 1493-1494. 

Oliver Wendell Holmes. 

Every Saturday, April 26, 1873, vol. 14, pp. 466-469. 



[267] 

The Poet at the Breakfast-Table [Re\'iew]. 
Southern Review, July, 1873, vol. 13, pp. 26-36. 

Oliver Wendell Holmes. 

Appleton's Journal, Oct. 13, 1874, vol. 12, pp. 545-547. 

Oliver Wendell Holmes, Biographical Sketch. 
Harvard Book, 1875, vol. i, pp. 252-253; with portrait. 

The Holmes Breakfast, Dec. 3, 1879. 

Atlantic Monthly, Feb.. 1880, vol. 45, supplement, pp. 1-24. 

Contents: — 
Mr. H. O. Houghton's remarks 1-3 

Dr. Holmes's poem, "The Iron Gate " 4-5 

Dr. Holmes's Reminiscence (read by Mr. Houghton) 5 
Mr. Whittier's poem, "Our Autocrat " 5-Q 

Mr. W. D. Howells's response 6-7 

Mrs. JuHa Ward Howe's remarks and poem 7-8 

Mr. CD. Warner's speech 8-9 

Mrs. Helen Hunt Jackson's poem, "To Oliver Wen- 
dell Hohnes on his Seventieth Birthday " (read by 
Mr. Warner) 9-10 

President Eliot's speech 10-11 

Mark Twain's explanation 11-12 

Mr. J. W. Harper's speech 12-13 

Mr. E. C. Stedman's poem 13-14 

Mr. Aldrich's speech 14 

Mr. Winter's poem — " Hearts and Holmes " 

[''The Chieftain"] 14-15 

Mr. Trowbridge's poem 15-16 

Mr. Cranch's sonnet 17 

Mr. T. W. Higginson's speech 18 

]VIr. Field's Fairy Tale (not read) 19 

In addition, many letters are printed, some of which were read 
at the Breakfast, and some not. 

Poetical Works [Review]. 

Modern Review, Jan., 1882, vol. 3, pp. 223-224. 
Dr. Oliver Wendell Holmes on Medicine. 

Medical Times and Gazette [London], Sept. 16, 1882, vol. 2 
of that year, pp. 356-357. 

Boston Medical and Surgical Journal, Oct. 5, 1882, vol. 107, 
pp. 331-332. 



[ 268 ] 

Dr. Oliver Wendell Holmes's Resignation of the 
Parkman Professorship of Anatomy in Harvard 
University. 

Boston Medical and Surgical Journal, Nov. 2, 1882, vol. 107, 
pp. 426-427. 

Oliver Wendell Holmes. 

The Sanitarian, 1883, vol. 11, p. 337; with portrait. 

A Reception to Drs. Holmes and Bigelovst. 

Boston Medical and Surgical Journal, Jan. 4, 1883, vol. 108, 

p. 22. 

Appointment of Oliver Wendell Holmes Emeritus 
Professor of Anatomy in Harvard University. 

Boston Medical and Surgical Journal, Jan. 11, 1883, vol. 108, 
p. 46. 

The New York Dinner to Dr. Holmes. 

Boston Medical and Surgical Journal, April 19, 1883, vol. 
108, pp. 378,379-380. 

Presentation of a Portrait of Professor Holmes to 
THE Harvard Medical School. 

Boston Medical and Surgical Journal, Oct. 25, 1883, vol. 109, 
p. 404. 

New Facts about Dr. Holmes. 

Boston Medical and Surgical Journal, April 3, 1884, vol. 110, 
p. 334. 

Quotation from an article on Dr. Holmes, his writings and his 
philosophy, in the Proceedings of the Literary and Philosophi- 
cal Society of Liverpool, 1881: "Besides the Professorship at 
Dartmoor, he founded and carried on a medical school at Fre- 
mont and had a large private practice." 

E. E. Brown's Life of Holmes [Review]. 
Saturday Review, May 17, 1884, vol. 57, p. 651. 

Oliver Wendell Holmes on his Seventy-Fifth Birth- 
day. 1809-1884. 
Critic, Aug. 30, 1884, n. s. vol. 2, pp. 97-108. 
This was a "Holmes Number," and, in addition to the editorial 



[ 269 ] 

article (by Miss Gilder),* contained letters from Matthew Arnold, 
Louisa M. Alcott, William F. Allen, Charles Barnard, Cyrus A. 
Bartol, H. H. Boyesen, Noah Brooks, Phillips Brooks, Frances 
Brown, John Burroughs, James Freeman Clarke, J. Esten 
Cooke, Rose Terry Cooke, Christopher P. Cranch, George 
William Curtis, Austin Dobson, Mary Mapes Dodge, R. Ogden 
Doremus, Samuel Adams Drake, Edward Eggleston, George 
P. Fisher, John Fiske, O. B. Frothingham, H. H. Furness, 
W. H. Furness, Sydney Howard Gay, W. A. Hammond, W. T. 
Harris, J. R. G. Hassard, JuHan Hawthorne, John Hay, Paul 
H. Hayne, Frederic H. Hedge, H. C. Lea, Benson J. Lossing, 
Donald G. Mitchell, James H. Morse, Simon Newcomb, F. W. 
Palfrey, EHzabeth Stuart Phelps, Henry C. Potter, H. W. Shaw 
("Josh Billings"), E. C. Stedman, Frank R.Stockton, Harriet 
Beecher Stowe, Maurice Thompson, J. T. Trowbridge, Moses 
Coit Tyler, Francis A. Walker, George E. Waring, Jr., Charles 
Dudley Warner, Andrew D. White, J. G. Whittier, Alex Win- 
chell, C. A. Young. Also poems by C. de K., Juha C. R. Dorr, 
R. W. Gilder, Edmund Gosse, Edward Everett Hale, Bret Harte, 
Lord Houghton, Frederick Locker, AHce WelHngton Rollins, 
and Edith M. Thomas. 

Dr. Holmes's "Last Leaf." 

Literary World, Nov. 28, 1885, vol. 16, p. 4,29. 

Dr. Haweis on Dr. Holmes. 

Critic, Jan. 23, 1886, vol. 8, pp. 46^7 (from the Pall Mall 
Gazette). 

Dr. Holmes's New Novel [Review of A Mortal Anti- 
pathy]. 
Literary World, Jan. 23, 1886, vol. 17, p. 23. 
Dr. Oliver Wendell Holmes. 

British Medical Journal, April 10, 1886, vol. 1 of that year, 
p. 707. 
The American Montaigne. 

Spectator, May 15, 1886, vol. 59, pp. 650-651. 
Oliver Wendell Holmes. 

British Medical Journal, June 12 and June 26, 1886, vol. 1 
of that year, pp. 1121 and 1223. 

* Including a facsimile of a letter from Dr. Ilohnes. 



[270] 

[Dr. Holmes at Oxford.] 

Christian Union, June 24, 1886, vol. 33,. p. 3. 

Dr. Holmes in England. 

Literary World, June 26, 1886, vol. 17, p. 216. 

Dr. Holmes in England. 

Boston Medical and Surgical Journal, June 30, 1886, vol. 114, 
p. 626. 

Dr. Oliver Wendell Holmes (Phcebo ante alios dilectus). 

Boston Medical and Surgical Journal, Sept. 2, 1886, vol. 115, 
p. 217. 

Portraits and Biographical Sketches of Twenty 
American Authors. Boston, 1887. 

Riverside Literatm-e Series, B. Holmes, no. 9 (unpaged). 

Recreations of the Rabelais Club, 1885-1888. [For 
private circulation only. 100 copies printed.] 

In tliis third series of the "Recreations," 10 lines from "The 
Old Player" are printed, followed by a translation into Latin 
by S[amuel] L[ee]; the Latin version is then put into Greek by 
A. S., and that into English by A[ndrew] L[ang]. Mr. Lang's 
English version is then done into French by W[alter] H[erries] 
P[ollock]; the French version into ItaHan by S. G. C. M[iddle- 
mere], and that back into English once more by Mr. Pollock. 

Mr. Lang's and Mr. Pollock's English versions are given 
below, together with the original passage. 

Dr. Holmes 

Call him not old, whose visionary brain 
Holds o'er the past its undivided reign. 
For him in vain the envious seasons roll 
Who bears eternal summer in his soul. 
If yet the minstrel's song, the poet's lay. 
Spring with her birds, or children at their play, 
Or maiden's smile, or heavenly dream of art, 
Stir the few life-drops creeping round his heart. 
Turn to the record where his years are told, — 
Count his gray hairs, — they cannot make him old. 



[ 271 ] 

Mr. Lang 
Call him not old whose kindly breast 
Retains the glow of seasons dead. 
Within whose heart is summer blest 
Despite the cruel winters fled; 
While yet the minstrel brings delight 
To such a soul with piercing song, 
While laughing girls and all things bright 
Of mortal art can please him long — 
Ah, though the warm heart-drops be rare, 
He yet is young, as he hath been. 
Beneath whose crown of silver hair 
Life and the love of life are green, 

Mr. Pollock 
Say not that he is old. His heart 
Is lord of bygone time. 
Winter in vain with envious smart 
Puts rime against his rhyme. 
His soul is summer. While the laugh of birds. 
Or happy girls, or children, makes him young, 
While he can think such thoughts, can write such words. 
Can sing again such songs as he has sung, 
"Stone walls do not a prison make, nor iron bars a cage," 
Nor whitening hairs do not reveal his age. 

Dr. Holmes in his Library. 

Book-Buyer, June, 1888, n. s. vol. 5, pp. 174-175. 

Before the Curfew, and Other Poems [Review]. 
Spectator, June 23, 1888, vol. 61, pp. 855-856. 

Before the Curfew, and Other Poems [Review]. 
Athenaeum, June 28, 1888, no. 3165, pp. 787-788. 

Dr. Holmes's Eightieth Birthday. 
Critic, Sept. 7, 1889, vol. 15, p. 115. 

Dr. Holmes's Religious Poems. 

New England Magazine, Oct., 1889, vol. 1, pp. 124-125. 

Dr. Holmes at Beverly Farms. 

Critic, Sept. 20, 1890, vol. 17, pp. 147-148 (from the Boston 
Daily Advertiser). 



[272] 

Oliver Wendell Holmes. 

Blackwood's Magazine, Aug., 1892, vol. 152, pp. 194-207. 
The Writings of Oliver Wendell Holmes [Review 
of Riverside Edition]. 

Spectator, Sept. 17, 1892, vol. 69, pp. 887-388. 

Massachusetts Historical Society, Proceedings of, on 
the Death of Oliver Wendell Holmes. 
Proceedings, etc., Oct. 11, 1894, 2d series, vol. 9, pp. 159-168. 
Remarks of George E. Ellis. 
Poem of William Everett. 
Letter from Hon. E. R. Hoar. 
Remarks of Henry Lee. 
Remarks of Hon. George F. Hoar. 
Remarks of Charles W. Eliot. 

Oliver Wendell Holmes. 

Boston Medical and Surgical Journal, Oct. 11, 1894, vol. 131, 
pp. 375-376. 

Oliver Wendell Holmes. 

Outlook, Oct. 13, 1894, vol. 50, pp. 578-579. 

Dr. Oliver Wendell Holmes. 

Athenaeum, Oct. 13, 1894, no. 3494, pp. 492-493. 

Oliver Wendell Holmes. 

Critic, Oct. 13, 1894, vol. 25, p. 242. 

Oliver Wendell Holmes. 

Saturday Review, Oct. 13, 1894, vol. 78, pp. 406-407. 

Oliver Wendell Holmes. 

Spectator, Oct. 13, 1894, vol. 73, pp. 485-487. 

LittelFs Living Age, Nov. 24, 1894, vol. 203, pp. 503-506. 

[Oliver Wendell Holmes.] 

Lancet (London), Oct. 13, 1894, vol. 2 of that year, pp. 862- 
863 and 882-883. 

The first is an editorial article upon Dr. Holmes, and the 
second an "obituary." 
[Oliver Wendell Holmes.] 

British Medical Journal, Oct. 13, 1894, vol. 2 of that year, 
pp. 839-841. 



[ 273 ] 

Oliver Wendell Holmes. 

Dial, Oct. 16, 1894, vol. 17, pp. 215-217. 
Oliver Wendell Holmes. 

Public Opinion, Oct. 18, 1894, vol. 17, p. 707. 

Oliver Wendell Holmes. 

Literary World, Oct. 20, 1894, vol. 25, p. 350. 

Medical Tributes to Dr. Holmes. 

Boston Medical and Surgical Journal, Oct. 25,1894, vol. 131, 
pp. 423-425. 

Oliver Wendell Holmes. 

Writer, Nov., 1894, vol. 7, pp. 161-167, 183. 

Personal tributes to the memory of Dr. Holmes, written at 
the request of the editor of the Writer, by F. B. Sanborn 
(poem), Charles Dudley Warner, Edward Eggleston, H. H. 
Boyesen, C. A. Bartol, George W. Cable, S. F. Smith, Julia 
C. R. Dorr (sonnet), Donald G. MitcheU, WiUiam H. Hayne, 
Richard Burton, Arlo Bates, J. T. Trowbridge, Thomas Nel- 
son Page, Elizabeth Stuart Phelps Ward, Joaquin Miller, and 
others. On p. 168 of the same number is an editorial article 
on Dr. H., and on p. 169 a letter from Rev. Edward E. Hale, 
inclosing a copy of a letter from Dr. H. to himself, dated 
Dec. 7, 1869. 

[Oliver Wendell Holmes.] 

Book News, Nov., 1894, vol. 13, pp. 70-72; with portrait, 
quotations from the New York Sun, and from certain articles 
in the Holmes number of the Critic. 

The Last Leaf [Review of Holiday Edition]. 

Outlook, Dec. 1, 1894, vol. 50, p. 916. 
Holmes Memorial Meeting of Boston Medical 
Library Association, Tuesday, Oct. 30, 1894. 

Boston Medical and Surgical Journal, Dec. 13, 1894, vol. 131, 
pp. 584-590. 

[Oliver Wendell Holmes.] 

Newsletter, Osterhout Library, Wilkesbarre, Pa., Dec, 1894. 

Oliver Wendell Holmes [Review of Riverside Edition 
of his Works]. 



[274] 

Quarterly Review, Jan., 1895, vol. 180, pp. 189-206. 
Littell's Living Age, March 2, 1895, vol. 204, pp. 537-549. 
Eclectic Magazine, April, 1895, vol. 124, pp. 433-444. 
Mr. Morse refers more than once to this article as a most 
judicious and discriminating one. 

Oliver Wendell Holmes. 1809-1894. 

Bulletin of Providence [R. I.] Public Library, Jan., 1895, vol. 1, 
pp. 3-4. 

Oliver Wendell Holmes on Immortality. 
Spectator, May 16, 1896, vol. 76, pp. 699-700. 

Dr. Holmes — Sic Sedebat [Review of Morse's Life and 
Letters of Dr. Holmes]. 
Atlantic Monthly, June, 1896, vol. 77, pp. 830-837. 
[Review of Morse's Life and Letters.] 

Book News, June, 1896, vol. 14, pp. 477-478 (from the New 
York Times). 

Life and Letters of Oliver Wendell Holmes [Re- 
view of Morse's Life and Letters, and Jerrold's Oliver 
Wendell Holmes]. 
Quarterly Review, Oct., 1896, vol. 87, pp. 77-94. 



[ 275 ] 

IV 

POEMS 

Aldrich, Thomas Bailey. The Sailing of the Autocrat. 
On Board the S. S. Cephalonia, April 26, 1886. 
The Sisters' Tragedy, with Other Poems, 1891. 
The last line reads 

"His absence will be shadow here." 
After the death of Dr. Holmes the following Knes were added 
to the poem, beneath the words "October 7, 1894," and have 
always since been printed with them: — 

" * His absence will be shadow here ' — 
A deeper shadow than I meant 
Has fallen on the waning year 
And with my lightsome verses blent. 
Another voyage was to be ! — 
The ship that bears him now from shore. 
To plough an unknown, chartless sea, 
Shall bring him back to us no more ! " 

Anonymous. Sweet Holmes ! [Dr. Oliver Wendell Holmes 
has resigned the Chair of Anatomy at Harvard Univer- 
sity.] 

Punch, Dec. 9, 1882, vol. 82, p. 274. 

Boston Medical and Surgical Journal, Jan. 25, 1883, vol. 108, 
p. 86. 

Your health, dear "Autocrat! " All England owns 
Your instrument *s the lyre, and not "the Bones." 
Yet hear our wishes — trust us they 're not cold ones! 
That though you give up bones, you may make old ones. 

Anonymous. Lyrics in a Library, ii. Oliver Wendell 
Holmes. 

Punch, April 10, 1886, vol. 89, p. 178. 

O Thou, whose wisdom and whose wit. 
Whose fancy and whose fable, 



[ 276 ] 

Have won two hemispheres to sit 

Around thy breakfast table, 
Our old-world notions never find 

A more indulgent critic, 
Though your sharp scalpel lurks behind 

Your verdicts analytic. 

In Elia's hand the essay writ 

With admirable fancy 
A thousand prosy subjects lit 

With potent necromancy. 
So now across the Western seas, 

Atlantic billows tost on, 
There comes, in precious books Hke these, 

A Lamb "designed of Boston." 

I never crossed from this old shore 

Atlantic ocean ridges, 
I never heard the Charles downpour 

Through all the Boston bridges; 
And yet, I seem to know your home, 

The "Hub," the Boston people; 
To see the State House with its dome. 

Hear chimes from Christchurch steeple. 

For I have pondered o'er each page, 

Till half by heart I know it, 
Of keen "Professor," kind and sage, 

Of tender-hearted "Poet; " 
Before the "Autocrat" I see 

In vain his foemen flounder. 
Like Don Diego Perez, he, 

A veritable "pounder." 

One idyl to my heart of hearts. 

Professor, you have granted. 
Though scarce susceptible to darts 

By Aphrodite planted. 
In Dreamland Iris still I woo; 

It raises up my dander. 
To think she married even you, 

A happy Marylander! 



[ 277 ] 

So trust me, Doctor, writing here, 

Afar 'mid English daisies, 
However unkempt my rhymes appear. 

That honest are my praises. 
I cry "Peccavi!" if you care 

With my poor verse to quarrel. 
Yet Punch may ask you '11 deign to wear 

This leaf of English Laurel. 

Anonymous. "The Autocrat." Oliver Wendell Holmes. 
Born 1809. Died October 7, 1894. 
Punch, Oct. 20, 1894, vol. 106, p. 191. 

Life and Letters of Oliver Wendell Holmes (Morse), vol. ii, 
pp. 96-97. 

The Last Leaf! Can it be true. 
We have turned it, and on you, 

Friend of all? 
That the years at last have power ? 
That life's foliage and its flower 

Fade and fall? 

Was there ever one who took 
From its shelf, by chance, a book. 

Penned by you. 
But was fast your friend for life. 
With one refuge from its strife 

Safe and true ? 

Even gentle Elia's self 

Might be proud to share that sheK, 

Leaf to leaf. 
With a soul of Idndred sort. 
Who could bind strong sense and sport 

In one sheaf. 

From that Boston breakfast-table. 
Wit and wisdom, fun and fable, 

Radiated 
Through all English-speaking places. 
When were Science and the Graces 

So well mated ? 



[278] 

Of sweet singers the most sane. 
Of keen wits the most hmnane. 

Wide, yet clear. 
Like the blue, above us bent. 
Giving sense and sentiment 

Each its sphere; 

With a manly breadth of soul, 
And a fancy quaint and droll. 

Ripe and mellow; 
With a virile power of "hit," 
Finished scholar, poet, wit. 

And good fellow I 

Sturdy patriot, and yet 
True world's citizen! Regret 

Dims our eyes 
As we turn each well-thumbed leaf; 
Yet a glory 'midst our grief 

Will arise. 



Years your spirit could not tame. 
And they will not dim your fame; 

England joys 
In your songs, all strength and ease. 
And the "dreams" you "wrote to please 

Gray-haired boys." 

And of such were you not one ? 
Age chilled not your fire of fun. 

Heart alive 
Makes a boy of a gray bard, 
Though his years be, "by the card," 

Eighty-five! 

[BiGELow, Jacob.] To a Tadpole. By O. W. H. 

Eolopesis: American Rejected Addresses, now first published 
from the original manuscripts, 1855. 

The poems in this volume, which was published anonymously, 
are parodies, not uniformly successful, of the work of various con- 
temporary poets. The relations between the author and Dr. 



[£79] 

Holmes were exceedingly intimate. The jBrst two and last three 
of the thirty-nine stanzas of "To a Tadpole" are here repro- 
duced. 

Thou nimble, polymorphous thing. 

With limbs within thee bound. 
Depending on thy caudal fin 
To scull thy body round, 

I fain thy character would read, 

From signs that thus prevail. 
And swear thou hast a waggish head 

On such a waggish tail. 



And though my hairs are getting thin 

And thy short tail is shorter. 
We '11 struggle yet a while to keep 

Our heads above the water. 

And we will sing a brave duet 

On life's eventful dream. 
And I will make the poetry 

And thou shalt make the theme. 

And when this planet shall explode. 

And send us through the air. 
They '11 find our bones in future rocks. 

And wonder what they were. 

Clark, George H. A Berkshire Breeze. 

Knickerbocker Magazine, April, 1856, vol. 47, pp. 336-340. 

Clarke, James Freeman. 

Life and Letters of Oliver Wendell Holmes (Morse), 1896, 
vol. ii, pp. 104-105. 

These stanzas were addressed to Dr. Holmes on the eve of his 
departure for Europe in April, 1886, and were acknowledged by 
him in a note (printed by Mr. Morse) in which he asks Mr. 
Clarke to "print these dear lines as my envoi.** 

May all good thoughts go with thee from this shore, 
AU kindly greetings meet thee on the other; 
Bring all they can they will not give thee more 
Than we send with thee. Poet, Friend, and Brother. 



[280] 

While thou art absent we will say "How often 

The gloom from off our hearts his smile has lifted; 

How well he knew our harder mood to soften, 

With gleams of sunlight where the storm clouds drifted! 

"And how, when that o'erwhelming weight of duty 
Pressed upon Lincoln's weary hand and brain. 
Our Holmes's song of tenderness and beauty 
Gave that worn heart a moment's rest again! 

"Go, then, dear friend, by all good hopes attended; 
To mother-England go, our carrier-dove. 
Saying that this great race, from hers descended. 
Sends in its Holmes an Easter-gift of love.'* 

Cone, Helen Gray. 

Critic, Oct. 13, 1894, vol. 25, pp. 243-244. 

Cranch, Christopher Pearse. To Oliver Wendell 
Holmes, Mi. 70. Read at the Atlantic Breakfast, Dec. 3, 
1879. 

Atlantic Monthly, Feb., 1880, vol. 45, supp. p. 17 (without 
title). 

Ariel and CaHban, with Other Poems, 1887, p. 169. 

A fountain in our green New England hills 
Sent forth a brook, whose music as I stood 
To hsten, laughed and sang through field and wood, 

With mingled melodies of joyous rills. 

Now, following where they led, a river fills 
Its channels with a wide, calm, shining flood. 
Still murmuring on its banks, with changeful mood. 

So, Poet, sound thy stops of various quills, 

Where waves of song, vsdt, wisdom, charm our ears 
As in thy youth, and thoughts and smiles by turns 
Are ours, grave, gay, or tender. Time forgets 

To freeze thy deepening stream. The stealthy years 
But bribe the Muse to bring thee amulets 
That guard the soul whose fire of youth still bums, 

De K[ay], Charles. To Oliver Wendell Holmes. 
Critic, Aug. 30, 1884, n. s. vol. 2, p. 100. 



[ 281 ] 

Dorr, Julia C. R. O. W. H. 

Critic, Aug. 30, 1884, n. s. vol. 2, p. 100. 

[Sonnet.] 
Writer, Nov., 1894, vol. 7, p. 163. 

Everett, William. 

Proceedings of the Massachusetts Historical Society, Oct. 11, 
1894, 2d series, vol. 9, pp. 161-162. 

One poet more, transferred to Homer's train; 

One healer more, removed to Galen's side; 
One more gold link upon our heroes* chain, — 

One friend the less, who never should have died. 

Friend, patriot, healer, poet, wit, and sage, — 

How hard, how strange, to count him with the past! 

We heard his gentle jests on time and age. 
Nor dreamed such foes could win the fight at last. 

Who for that grave may twine a fitting crown. 
Where memory's pansy blends with glory's bay? 

Whose pen like his, for ever now laid down. 
Tender to feel, and lively to portray ? 

Yet, while from yonder tower he loved so long 
Still chime the echoes of his funeral psahn, 

Let not the master lack one modest song. 
Till bolder hands shall plant some statelier palm. 

No single flower that garland can supply. 
Such vast and varied springs his genius held. 

Whence through a score of channels, never dry. 

Fresh, deep, and pure, their shining currents welled. 

Sprung from New England's chiefs and saints of yore, 

His heart was rooted to her soil alone. 
Nor siren charms from lands the ocean o'er 

E'er shook his protid allegiance to his own. 

Bom where our ancient college throws her shade. 
He served, he loved her, student to the last; 

While o'er her sons in festive ranks arrayed 
His genial Muse unfailing fragrance cast. 



[ 282 ] 

In love he practised, and in patience taught, 
The sacred art that battles with disease; 

Nor stained, by one disloyal act or thought. 
The holy symbol of Hippocrates. 

His lyre through every mood of music rang. 
The banquet's carol, and the battle's hymn; 

Now warbHng like a child at play, it sang. 
Now soared to echoes of the seraphim. 

Lustrous and leaping, like the Boreal dawn, 
His wit o'er every theme ranged unconfined; 

Flashed Hke a rapier's point in combat drawn. 
But drew no blood, and left no sore behind. 

Wide as our country, wide as England's tongue. 
Flew his bright name, itseK a household word; 

How frankly proud to all those wreaths he clung. 
How kindly caught each breath of praise he heard! 

Dear were those plaudit notes; but dearer far 
One treasure, prized o'er all that high renown. 

Friendship's gemmed circlet, every friend a star. 
Outshining victor's helm or empire's crown. 

So lived, so sang, so talked he; youth's gay beam. 
Manhood's hot splendor, age's milder glow. 

Each in its turn might fairest radiance seem, 
As year by year we watched them shine and go. 

Threescore and ten with gentle footstep came. 
Nor labor pressed, nor sorrow, at fourscore; 

One lustre more; then rang his sunnnoned name 
In softest music through Elysium's door. 

His bright task wrought, his meed of glory won, 
His country honored, and his Kind improved : 

Room there is none for tears; yet tears will run, 
For bard, for master, and for friend removed. 



[ 283 ] 

Gilder, Richard Watson. August 29, 1809. 
Critic, Aug. 30, 1884, n. s. vol. 2, p. 102. 

God bless the day! But he hath blest 
(And all the grateful world doth know it), 

That happy day, when, in the West, 
Was born the wise and witty poet — 

The poet who first to Science sought, 

And to the merry muses after; 
Who learned what in no school is taught — 

The secret of men*s tears and laughter. 

Be it, O Time, a weaiy while. 

Ere, in the land where spirits meet us, 

A shade shall say (with Shakespeare's smile), 
"There comes the Autocrat to greet us." 

GossE, Edmund. An Epistle to Dr. Oliver Wendell Holmes 
on his Seventy-Fifth Birthday, August 29, 1884. 
Critic, Aug. 30, 1884, n. s. vol. 2, p. 102. 
Athenaeum, Aug. 30, 1884, no. 2966, p. 274. 
This poem was also printed separately by Mr. Gosse, in a 
very limited edition. 

Hale, Edward Everett. Of the Chief — and To Him. 
Critic, Aug. SO, 1884, n. s. vol. 2, p. 103. 

Harte, Bret. Our Laureate. 

Critic, Aug. 30, 1884, n. s. vol. 2, p. 103. 

One day, from groves of pine and pahn. 

The poets of the sky and cover 
Had come to greet with song and psalm 

The whip-poor-vidll, — their woodland lover. 
All sang their best, but one clear note 

That fairly voiced their admiration 
Was his — who only sang by rote — 

The mock-bird*s modest imitation. 

So we, who 'd praise the bard who most 

Is poet of each high occasion. 
Who *d laud our laureate, and toast 

The bhthe Toast-Master of the Nation. — 



[284] 

To celebrate his fete to-day, 

In vain each bard his praise rehearses. 

The best that we can sing or say 
Is but an echo of his verses. 

Heitland, W. E. Lines of Greeting to Dr. Oliver Wendell 
Holmes at Breakfast in Combination Room, St. John*s 
College, Cambridge [England]. 
Academy, July 3, 1886, vol. 30, p. 9. 
Houghton, Lord. To Oliver Wendell Holmes. 
Critic, Aug. 30, 1884, n. s. vol. 2, p. 104. 

Howe, Julia Ward. Lines read at the Holmes Breakfast, 
Dec. 3, 1879. 
Atlantic Monthly, Feb., 1880, vol. 45, supp. pp. 7-8. 

Jackson, Helen Hunt [H. H.]. To Oliver Wendell Holmes 
on his Seventy-Fifth Birthday. Read (by Mr. Warner) 
at the Atlantic Breakfast, Dec. 3, 1879. 

Atlantic Monthly, Feb., 1880, vol. 45, supp. pp. 9-10. 
James, Bushrod W. Oliver Wendell Holmes. 

Arena, Dec, 1894, vol. 11, p. 55. 
Larcom, Lucy. O. W. H. August 29, 1879. 

Wild Roses of Cape Ann, 1880. 
Locker, Frederick. Dr. Oliver W. Holmes. 
Critic, Aug. 30, 1884, n. s. vol. 2, p. 104. 

From Boston Town they write to say 
Their bard is seventy-five to-day. 

And all the world must know it; 
But while to him this stave I twine 
I wish his birthday could be mine. 
And he could be my poet. 

Lowell, James Russell. A Fable for Critics. 

Poems, Riverside Edition, vol. iii, pp. 84-85. 
. To Holmes on his Seventy-Fifth Birthday. 

Critic, Sept. 20, 1884, n. s. vol. 2, p. 133. 

Heartsease and Rue, 1888. 
Mitchell, Silas Weir. Verses read on presentation of 



[ 285 ] 

Mrs. Whitman's portrait of Dr. Holmes to the Philadel- 
phia College of Physicians and Surgeons, April 30, 1892. 

Boston Medical and Surgical Journal, May 5, 1892, vol. 126, 
pp. 450-451. 

Collected Poems, 1896, p. 344. 

Roberts, Charles G. D. Oliver Wendell Holmes. Obiit 
October 7, 1894. 
Dial, Oct. 1, 1895, vol. 19, p. 169. 

Rollins, Alice Wellington. The Silent Tribute. 
Critic, Aug. 30, 1884, n. s. vol. 2, p. 106. 

Sanborn, Franklin B. Dr. Holmes. 
Writer, Nov., 1894, vol. 7, p. 161. 

Poet and Wit! with heartiest love for man. 

Narrowed at first in range, — but wider flowing 
When lengthened life unfolded aU her plain, 
And on his brow mild age was softly snowing. 

Smith, Samuel F. OUver Wendell Holmes. In Memoriam. 
Poems of Home and Country, 1895, pp. 109-110. 

Stedman, Edmund Clarence. Read at the Atlantic Break- 
fast, .Dec 3, 1879. 
Atlantic Monthly, Feb., 1880, vol. 45, supp. pp. 13-14. 

Thomas, Edith M. To Dr. Holmes on his Seventy-Fifth 
Birthday. 
Critic, Aug. 30, 1884, n. s. vol. 2, p. 106. 

Trowbridge, John Townsend. Filling an Order. Read 
at the Atlantic Breakfast, Dec. 8, 1879. 
Atlantic Monthly, Feb., 1880, vol. 45, supp. pp. 15-16. 
A Home Idyl, and Other Poems, 1881. 

Whittier, John Greenleaf. Our Autocrat. Read at 
the Atlantic Breakfast, Dec. 3, 1879. 
Atlantic Monthly, Feb., 1880, vol. 45, supp. pp. 5-6. 

. To OUver Wendell Holmes on his Eightieth Birth- 
day. 
Poems, Riverside Edition, vol. iv, p. 302. 



1 



[ 286 ] 

Whittier, John Greenleaf. To Oliver Wendell Holmes. 
Sth mo, 29tli, 1892. 
Atlantic Monthly, Sept., 1892, vol. 70, pp. 401-402. 
This was the last poem written by Whittier. 

Winter, William. The Chieftain. Read at the Atlantic 
Breakfast, Dec. 3, 1879. 

Atlantic Monthly, Feb., 1880, vol. 45, supp. pp. 14-15. 

Mr. Winter gave his poem the title, "Hearts and Holmes," 
for the occasion, but requested that it be printed as "The Chief- 
tain." 



RECORD OF SALES AT AUCTION 

The following records are taken, necessarily, from the publica- 
tion called Book-Prices Current, which Mr. Luther S. Livingston 
has compiled for the past twelve or thirteen years. The volumes 
included in the record are arranged as in the second division of 
the bibliography — chronologically. At the end will be found 
some few memoranda of sales of manuscripts, taken from the 
same source, and arranged according to the dates of sale. Sales 
of single works included in the first section of the bibliography 
are noted in connection with those works. The compiler is much 
indebted to Mr. Livingston for supplying him with notes of sales 
for the year 1905-06, before the volume of Book-Prices Current for 
that year had appeared. The word " sale '* after a name indi- 
cates that the name is that of the owner of the volume sold; 
names standing alone are those of the auctioneers, and indicate 
that the owner's name was not disclosed. 

The Harbinger 

Foote sale, 1894, levant $15.00 

Bangs, April 1897 14.00 

Libbie, June 1897 3.50 

Libbie, Sept. 1897 4.50 

Bangs, Jan. 1898 4.50 

Deane sale, 1898; presentation copy 7.00 

Libbie, Nov. 1898 * 3.00 

Bangs, March 1899; autograph letter inserted 6.25 

Roos sale, 1900 12.00 

Daly sale, 1900 12.00 

Arnold sale, 1901 21.00 

Brown Duplicate sale, 1901 19.50 

French sale, 1901 18.00 

Libbie, Nov. 1901 6.50 

Libbie, Dec. 1901 11.00 

McKee sale, 1902 29.00 

Appleton sale, 1903, levant 29.00 



[288] 



Libbie, June 1904 (imperfect) 


$4.50 


Anderson, Oct. 1904 


10.00 


Libbie, March 1905 


8.00 


Anderson, April 1905 


12.00 


Anderson, June 1905 


4.25 


Libbie, Nov. 1905 


8.00 


Denny sale, 1906 


17.00 


Merwin-Clayton, Feb. 1906 


9.50 


Pyser sale, 1906 


9.50 


PoF.MS, 1836 




Foote sale, 1894, J mor.; 8 lines of one poem in 




author's autograph 


20.00 


Libbie, Jan. 1895 


6.05 


Bangs, April 1895 


8.00 


Bangs, April 1895 


8.20 


Libl^ie, Feb. 1897 


5.55 


Bangs, April 1897; orig. cloth, uncut 


16.00 


Bangs, May 1897; orig. cloth, uncut 


9.00 


Blanchard sale, 1898 


10.20 


Bangs, March 1899; autograph letter inserted 


7.50 


Roos sale, 1900 


12.50 


Mackay sale, 1900 


8.00 


McKee" sale, 1900 


14.00 


Arnold sale, 1901 


23.00 


Bangs, Feb. 1901 


17.00 


Libbie, Nov. 1901 


4.25 


Bangs, Jan. 1902; autograph letter inserted 


21.00 


Appleton sale, 1903, levant 


20.00 


Anderson, April 1903 


12.00 


Bartlett sale, 1903 


15.00 


French and Chubbuck sale, 1904 


6.00 


Libbie, March 1904 


7.00 


Stephens sale, 1904 


4.25 


Anderson, May 1904, levant 


10.00 


Anderson, Oct. 1904; autograph of J. S. Dwight 


14.00 


Anderson, Jan. 1905, levant 


15.00 


Knapp sale, 1905 


4.75 


Merwin-Clayton, March 1905 


4.50 


Anderson, March 1905, levant 


21.00 


Libbie, March 1905; with author's autograph 


3.50 



[ 289 ] 

Anderson, Dec. 1905 $6.10 

Merwin-Clayton, Feb. 1906 17.00 

Merwin-Clayton, March 1906 5.00 

Anderson, April 1906 10.10 

Barry sale, 1906, morocco 9.80 

Merwin-Clayton, May 1906 4.25 

Pyser sale, 1906 11.00 

Poems, 1846 (London) 

Foote sale, 1894, mor. ; 4 lines in author's autograph 20.00 

Bangs, April 1896 8.25 

Bangs, Nov. 1896 17.50 

Libbie, April 1897 5.50 

Deane sale, 1898 3.25 

McKee sale, 1900 7.00 
Arnold sale, 1901 ; presentation copy to Dr. Morton, 

with autograph of O. W. H. 47.00 

Bangs, Jan. 1902 5.00 

Appleton sale, 1903, levant 12.00 

Pyser sale, 1906 (rebacked) 1.75 

Urania: A Rhymed Lesson 

Foote sale, 1894 6.50 

Libbie, March 1896 4.50 

Libbie, June 1896; autograph note inserted 6.00 

Bangs, April 1897 5.00 

Bangs, May 1898; presentation copy 4.00 

Libbie, Nov. 1898; presentation copy 4.50 

Bangs, June 1899; presentation copy 3.00 

Roos sale, 1900 3.00 

McKee sale, 1900 2.25 

Arnold sale, 1901 5.00 
French sale, 1901, levant; autograph letter inserted 40.00 

Bangs, May 1901 3.60 

Whipple sale, 1903; presentation copy 6.50 

Libbie, Nov. 1904; presentation copy 3.10 

Bangs sale, 1905; presentation copy 4.25 

Wheeler sale, 1905 3.25 

Anderson, Jan. 1906 3.40 

Brandon sale, 1906 4,00 

Pyser sale, 1906 2.00 



[290] 

Poems, 1849 : first issue 

(The copies preceded by an asterisk are those as to which the 
catalogue stated that they were of the first issue; as to the others 
no statement was made.) 

*Foote sale, 1894, mor.; one stanza of "The Last Leaf'* 



in author's autograph 


$20.00 


Libbie, March 1896 


9.00 


Bangs, April 1896 


5.50 


Bangs, April 1897 


7.75 


Libbie, April 1897 


2.50 


Blanchard sale, 1898 


4.00 


Libbie, April 1900 


4.00 


Bangs, May 1900 


4.13 


*Amold sale, 1901 


10.50 


Libbie, Dec. 1901 


3.50 


Anderson, Oct. 1902 


9.00 


* Whipple sale, 1903; presentation copy 


48.00 


*Anderson, June 1905 


7.50 


Anderson, Jan. 1906 


3.75 


*Pyser sale, 1906 ("very fine copy") 


1.50 


Poems, 1849 : second issue 




Foote sale, 1894, mor.; autograph letter inserted 


10.00 


Arnold sale, 1901; autograph letter (2 pp.) inserted 


31.00 


Anderson, June 1905 ; autograph letter inserted 


6.25 


Pyser sale, 1906 (imperfect) 


.75 


Astk^a: the Balance of Illusions 




Bangs, April 1897 


1.50 


McKee sale, 1900 


1.25 


Arnold sale, 1901 


1.50 


Bangs, Feb. 1901, levant 


4.00 


Peirce sale, 1903 


4.00 


Pattee sale, 1905 


4.50 


Comstock sale, 1906 


5.00 


Pyser sale, 1906 


.30 


Poems, 1852 (London) 




Arnold sale, 1901 


1.75 


Songs of the Class of 1829 : edition of 1868 




Libbie, Oct. 1896 


4.50 


Libbie, Dec. 1896 


5.00 



[291] 

The Address of Mr. Everett, and the Poem of 
Dr. Holmes, at the dinner to Prince Napoleon, 1861 

Foote sale, 1894 $7.50 

Bangs, April 1897 6.00 

Arnold sale, 1901 2.00 

Libbie, Dec. 1901 3.50 
French and Chubbuck sale, 1904; portrait inserted, also 

autograph letters of Everett and Holmes 12.50 

Songs in Many Keys 

Bangs, April 1897 4.25 

, Bangs, April 1897 2.75 

McKee sale, 1900 2.50 

Arnold sale, 1901 3.00 

Whipple sale, 1903; presentation copy 36.00 
French and Chubbuck sale, 1904; presentation copy 12.00 

Huntington sale, 1905; presentation copy 6.25 

Denny sale, 1906 3.10 

Pyser sale, 1906; presentation copy 13.00 

Songs of Many Seasons 

Foote sale, 1894; autograph letter inserted 6.50 

Arnold sale, 1901 1.75 

Pyser sale, 1906 2.10 

A Famh^y Record 

Libbie, March 1896 6.50 

Libbie, Sept. 1897 3.50 

Arnold sale, 1901 21.00 

Pyser sale, 1906; autograph letter inserted 46.00 

Poems, Household Edition, 1877 

Arnold sale, 1901 .50 

Hurst sale, 1904; presentation copy 6.50 

The School-Boy 

Libbie, April 1897 1.50 

Arnold sale, 1901 1.00 
French and Chubbuck sale, 1904; autograph letter 

inserted 4.75 

The Iron Gate, and Other Poems 

Bangs, April 1897 1.88 

Whipple sale, 1903; presentation copy 15.00 



[292] 

Alger sale, 1905; presentation copy, with autograph 
inscription: leaflet, "In Memory of Fitz-Greene 
Halleck," with author's autograph inserted $43.00 

Poems, Handy Volume Edition, 1881 ; 2 vols. 

Pyser sale, 1906; presentation copy 10.50 

Before the Curfew, and Other Poems 

Bangs, April 1897 2.75 

Arnold sale, 1901; autograph letter inserted 6.00 

Bangs, Feb. 1901, levant 9.50 

Whipple sale, 1903 4.50 

French and Chubbuck sale, 1904; presentation copy 3.00 

Pyser sale, 1906 3.50 

The One-Hoss Shay, etc., 1892 

Libbie, Dec. 1901 5.00 
Carey sale, 1902; autograph poem, signed and dated, 

on fly-leaf 35.00 

Pyser sale, 1906 1.00 

Dorothy Q., etc., 1893 

Libbie, April 1895, large paper; autograph letter inserted 5.50 

Whipple sale, 1903; presentation copy 26.00 

Pyser sale, 1906 1.00 

Poems, Riverside Edition: 3 vols. 

Foote sale, 1894; autograph letter inserted 8.25 

BoYLSTON Prize Dissertations 

Libbie, Dec. 1896 3.25 

Arnold sale, 1901 2.00 

Pyser sale, 1906 .25 

Homceopathy, and its Kindred Delusions 

Foote sale, 1894 3.00 

McKee sale, 1900 3.25 

Arnold sale, 1901 ; autograph letter (3 pp.) inserted 22.00 

Peirce sale, 1903 4.00 

May sale, 1903 4.25 

Swan sale, 1904 3.00 

Knapp sale, 1905 5.00 

Pyser sale, 1906 3.25 

The Contagiousness of Puerperal Fever 

Bangs, Jan. 1897 3.50 

Arnold sale, 1901 (imperfect) 24.00 



[293] 

Puerperal Fever as a Private Pestilence 

Libbie, April 1897 $3.60 

Blanchard sale, 1898; presentation copy 4.00 

Arnold sale, 1901 8.00 

Pyser sale, 1906 .50 

The Position and Prospects of the Medical 
Student 
Libbie, April 1897 2.12 

Bangs, Sept. 1902 4.75 

An Introductory Lecture at the Massachusetts 
Medical College, 1847 
Libbie, April 1897 1.00 

Peirce sale, 1903 4.50 

The Benefactors of the Medical School of 
Harvard University 
Arnold sale, 1901; presentation copy to Dr. Bigelow 5.50 

Oration before the New England Society in 
New York, 1855 
Arnold sale, 1901 3.00 

Valedictory Address to the Medical Graduates 
of Harvard University, 1858 
Libbie, April 1897 1.60 

Arnold sale, 1901 1.25 

Pyser sale, 1906 .40 

The Autocrat of the Breakfast-Table : first edi- 
tion, first issue (with engraved half-title) 

Foote sale, 1894, mor.; autograph letter inserted 25.00 

Bangs, May 1895 18.00 

Libbie, Jan. 1896 3.00 

Bangs, March 1896 6.50 

Libbie, March 1896 5.25 

Bangs, April 1897 4.00 

Libbie, April 1897 8.50 

Libbie, May 1897 4.50 

Blanchard sale, 1898 4.50 

Camith sale, 1898 5.00 

Libbie, Nov. 1898; autograph letter inserted 3.50 
Bangs, April 1899; autograph letter inserted (imperfect) 3.00 

Bangs, Oct. 1899 3.50 



[294] 



Roos sale, 1900 


$4.00 


Mackay sale, 1900 


4.00 


Bangs, May 1900, J levant 


9.00 


McKee sale, 1900 


5.00 


Arnold sale, 1901; autograph of one stanza of "The 




Chambered Nautilus," dated 1892 


35.00 


Bangs, March 1901 


4.75 


Libbie, April 1901 


6.37 


Libbie, Dec. 1901 


11.00 


Bangs, March 1902, J levant 


6.50 


Morgan sale, 1902 


14.50 


Bangs, Nov. 1902; autograph letter inserted 


7.00 


May sale, 1903 


3.00 


Appleton sale, 1903, levant 


40.00 


Bartlett sale, 1903 


3.25 


Peirce sale, 1903 


8.00 


Drowne sale, 1903 


8.00 


French and Chubbuck sale, 1904 


6.00 


Anderson, Oct. 1904 


4.50 


Anderson, Dec. 1904 ; autograph letter inserted 


12.25 


Merwin-Clayton, March 1905 


7.00 


Poole sale, 1905 


4.50 


Anderson, June 1905 


3.50 


Harvey sale, 1906 


5.60 


Anderson, Jan. 1906 


3.75 


Davis sale, 1906 


3.50 


Searing sale, 1906 


4.50 


Burnett sale, 1906; autograph letter inserted 


15.50 


Pyser sale, 1906 


11.00 


The Samf,: first edition, second issue 




Arnold sale, 1901; autograph letter (3 pp.) inserted 


10.00 


Pyser sale, 1906 


1.25 


The Same, 1859 ; large paper * 




Bangs, Jan. 1897; presentation copy 


10.25 


French sale, 1901, large paper; presentation copy 


51.00 


Whipple sale, 1903, large paper; presentation copy with 




autograph letter inserted 


16.00 


Knapp sale, 1905; autograph letter inserted 


16.75 



^ A copy on ordinary paper was sold at Anderson's in Jan., 1905, for 
$6.50. 



[295] 



Alger sale, 1905; autograph letter inserted (im 


perfect) 


$9.00 


Merwin-Clayton, May 1906 




3.75 


Street sale, 1906 




3.00 


Pyser sale, 1906 




40.00 


The Same, 1860 






Pennypacker sale, 1906; presentation copy 




12.00 


The Same, 1893: holiday edition, 2 vols., illustrated 




by H. Pyle 






Libbie, Oct. 1895 




6.00 


Bangs, April 1900 




8.00 


Anderson, April 1900 




6.00 


The Professor at the Breakfast-Table 


i: first 




edition, 1860 






Foote sale, 1894, mor. 




9.50 


Bangs, May 1895 




5.00 


Libbie, March 1897 




3.50 


Bangs, April 1897 




6.00 


Bangs, April 1899, levant 




7.50 


Boos sale, 1900 




3.25 


Arnold sale, 1901; autograph of 3 stanzas of * 


* Under 




the Violets," dated 1860 




33.00 


French sale, 1901 




25.50 


Libbie, Dec. 1901 




8.00 


Bangs, Jan. 1902 




9.50 


Appleton sale, 1902 




6.50 


Appleton sale, 1903, levant 




20.00 


Peirce sale, 1903 




7.50 


Whipple sale, 1903 




8.00 


Whipple sale, 1903; presentation copy, with au 


itograph 




letter inserted 




65.00 


Libbie, June 1904 




3.50 


Anderson, Oct. 1904 




4.50 


Knapp sale, 1905 




5.00 


Libbie, March 1905 




S.25 


Lemoyne sale, 1905 




4.75 


Pyser sale, 1906 




6.50 


Peacock sale, 1906 




3.00 


Denny sale, 1906, large paper 




4.50 



[296] 

Currents and Counter-Currents in Medical Sct- 

ENCE 



Bangs, May 1895 


$5.50 


Libbie, AprH 1897 


2.75 


Arnold sale, 1901 


3.50 


Hammond sale, 1902; presentation copy to W. A. 




Hammond 


5.50 


Whipple sale, 1903; autograph letter inserted 


3.25 


Merwin-Clayton, April 1905; autograph letter inserted 


3.00 


Pyser sale, 1906 


.50 


Currents and Counter-Currents in Medical Sci- 




ence, "WITH Other Addresses and Essays 




Bangs, April 1897 


2.00 


Arnold sale, 1901 


1.00 


Et/SIE Venner: first edition, 2 vols. 




Foote sale, 1894; autograph letter inserted 


7.50 


Bangs, Nov. 1894 


4.00 


Libbie, April 1895 


5.00 


Libbie, March 1896 


3.75 


Bangs, April 1896 


3.50 


Bangs, April 1896 


4.00 


Bangs, April 1897 


5.25 


Libbie, April 1897 


3.75 


Libbie, May 1897 


4.00 


Carruth sale, 1898 


3.00 


Libbie, Nov. 1898 


5.00 


Roos sale, 1900 


3.25 


Mackay sale, 1900 


4.00 


Arnold sale, 1901 


4.25 


Libbie, March 1901 


5.00 


Bangs, April 1901 


4.50 


Bangs, Dec. 1901 


3.00 


Bangs, Jan. 1902 


6.00 


Bangs, Feb. 1902 


4.20 


Bangs, Oct. 1902 


4.50 


Appleton sale, 1903 


7.00 


Whipple sale, 1903; presentation copy, with autograph 




letter inserted 


40.00 


Peirce sale, 1903 


4.50 


Cressy sale, 1903 


3.50 



[297] 

Libbie, June 1904 $4.00 

Libbie, March 1905 3.50 

Merwin-Clayton, Feb. 1906 4.70 

Pyser sale, 1906; presentation copy 10.00 

Medical Directions, etc., 1862 

Peirce sale, 1903 5.50 

Border Lines of E[nowi.edge in some Provinces 
OF Medical. Science 
Bangs, April 1897 1.63 

Arnold sale, 1901 1.00 

Whipple sale, 1903; presentation copy 6.00 

French and Chubbuck sale, 1904; presentation copy 14.00 

Oration before the City Authorities of Boston, July 4, 
1863 ; regular edition 
Bangs, AprU 1897, J calf 2.25 

Arnold sale, 1901 1.63 

Lincohi sale, 1901 7.00 

French and Chubbuck sale, 1904; preface signed by 
author and 2 autograph letters inserted 75.00 

The Same. Philadelphia 

Hutchinson sale, 1906 5.50 

The Same: quarto edition, 12 printed 

Livermore sale, 1894 19.00 

Lincoln sale, 1901; presentation copy to F. W. Lincoln, 

Jr., with autographic inscription * 40.00 

Knapp sale, 1905 25.00 

The Guardian Angel: first edition 

Bangs, April 1897 2.25 

Arnold sale, 1901; autograph letter inserted 12.00 

Libbie, Dec. 1901 3.75 

Bangs, Jan. 1902 3.25 

Whipple sale, 1903; presentation copy 42.00 

Pyser sale, 1906 .50 

Teaching from the Chair and at the Bedside 

Libbie, April 1897 3.75 

* At this same sale a copy of the 4to edition without Dr. Holmes's 
introductory note (see p. 180, supra) brought only $7.00. 



[298] 

History of the American Stereoscope 

Arnold sale, 1901 $14.00 

Mechanism in Thought and Morals 

Foote sale, 1894; autograph letter inserted 9.00 

Whipple sale, 1903; presentation copy 40.00 

Anderson, March 1904; autograph letter inserted 3.25 

Anderson, April 1904; presentation copy 6.25 

Alger sale, 1905; presentation copy 21.00 

The Claims of Dentistry 

Libhie, April 1897 2.25 

Arnold sale, 1901 1.25 

The Poet at the Breakfast-Table: first edition' 

Foote sale, 1894, mor. 8.75 

Libbie, April 1895 9.50 

Bangs, May 1895 6.00 

Bangs, March 1896 3.00 

Bangs, Jan. 1897; presentation copy 8.00 

Bangs, April 1897 9.00 

Libbie, April 1897 3.25 

Blanchard sale, 1898 4.75 

Libbie, Nov. 1898; autograph letter inserted 4.25 

Bangs, April 1899, levant 8.50 

Libbie, May 1899 3.00 

Libbie, Feb. 1900 4.12 

Boos sale, 1900 3.13 

Bangs, April 1900 3.60 

Arnold sale, 1901; two autograph letters inserted 22.00 
French sale, 1901 ; the C. B. Foote copy (see first entry 

above) 24.00 

Libbie, Dec. 1901 6.00 

Bangs, Jan. 1902 9.00 

May sale, 1903 4.00 

Whipple sale, 1903; presentation copy 35.00 

Appleton sale, 1903 8.50 

Anderson, April 1903 5.25 

Somerby sale, 1903 3.50 

Anderson, Jan. 1904 5.00 

Anderson, Oct. 1904 3.75 

* A " presentation copy" of an edition of 1877 was sold at Aaderson's 
in Jan., 1905, for $10.00. 



[ 299 ] 

Alger sale, 1905 

Anderson, Jan. 1906 4.25 

Denny sale, 1906 4.00 

Brandon sale, 1906 3.25 

Pyser sale, 1906 3.50 

Breakfast-Table Series: Autocrat, 1858, Professor, 
1860, Poet, 1872 (all first editions) 

Anderson, April 1905; autograph letter inserted 57.00 

John Lothrop Motley: first edition 

Bangs, April 1897 2.75 

Bangs, April 1897, large paper 10.00 

Deane sale, 1898; presentation copy 3.50 
Daly sale, 1900; 57 portraits and an autograph letter 

inserted 43.00 
Arnold sale, 1901, large paper; autograph letter to R. C. 

Winthrop inserted ^ 10.50 

Bangs, Jan. 1901 5.25 

Henkels, Nov. 1902 3.00 
French and Chubbuck sale, 1904 ; autograph letter inserted 7.00 

Pyser sale, 1906, large paper 3.00 

Pages from an Old Volume of Life : first edition 

Pyser sale, 1906; the Foote copy 1.50 

Ralph Waldo Emerson 

Carruth sale, 1898; autograph letter inserted 5.50 

McKee sale, 1900; sheets 2.00 

Arnold sale, 1901 1.25 

Bangs, Jan. 1901; sheets 3.50 

Whipple sale, 1903 35.00 
Denny sale, 1906; presentation copy to J. S. Dwight 9.00 

Anderson, Jan. 1906; autograph letter inserted 12.50 

Merwin-Clayton, 1906; the Denny copy 13.00 

Pyser sale, 1906; "original pink boards" 12.50 

A Mortal Antipathy: first edition 

Bangs, April 1897 2.25 

Arnold sale, 1901 ; autograph letter inserted 5.00 

Whipple sale, 1903; presentation copy 45.00 

Pyser sale, 1906 1.00 

Our Hundred Days in Europe : first edition 

Foote sale, 1894, J mor.; autograph letter inserted 5.50 



1 



[ 300 ] 

Bangs, April 1897 $2.00 
Libbie, April 1897, levant ; 54 portraits and plates inserted 7.25 
Libbie, April 1897, large paper; autograph letter in- 
serted 9.00 
Bangs, April 1900; presentation copy, with inscription 

and autograph note on p. Ill 15.50 
Arnold sale, 1901 ; autograph letter inserted 8.25 
Appleton sale, 1903, levant; 54 extra plates inserted 17.50 
French and Chubbuck sale, 1904, mor.; 43 plates in- 
serted 8.00 

Over the Teacups: first edition 

Foote sale, 1894; autograph letter inserted 12.00 

Bangs, April 1897 3.00 

Arnold sale, 1901; autograph letter inserted 4.75 

Libbie, Dec. 1901 3.00 

Whipple sale, 1903; presentation copy 42.50 

Bartlett sale, 1903; presentation copy 16.00 

Phillips sale, 1906; presentation copy 10.00 

Works: Riverside Edition 

Bangs, Jan. 1895, 13 vols., large paper 55.25 

Bangs, Jan. 1896, 14 vols., large paper 42.00 

Bangs, Dec. 1896, 16 vols., large paper 48.00 

Bangs, Feb. 1897, 16 vols., large paper 37.60 

Henkels, March 1897, 14 vols., large paper 36.40 

Bangs, Nov. 1897, 13 vols. 14.95 

Henkels, March 1898, 13 vols., J levant 48.75 

Bangs, April 1899, 16 vols., large paper 64.00 

Daly sale, 1900, 16 vols., large paper 80.00 

Bangs, Nov. 1901, 16 vols., large paper 68.00 
Bangs, Feb. 1902; Autocrat, Professor and Poet, 3 vols., 

with 105 extra portraits and views inserted 19.50 

Wales sale, 1903, 14 vols., large paper 66.50 

Peirce sale, 1903, 16 vols.,, 84.00 

Anderson, May 1904, 14 vols., large paper 52.50 

Field sale, 1905, 13 vols., large paper 56.00 

Works: Standard Library Edition 

Henkels, Sept. 1896 14.30 

Libbie, Dec. 1896, J levant 22.75 

Bangs, June 1897, | mor. 39.00 

Libbie, Nov. 1898, J levant 39.00 



[301] 



Libbie, Jan. 1899, i levant 


$32.50 


Bangs, Jan. 1899, J mor. 


22.50 


Libbie, April 1900 


19.50 


Bangs, May 1900, J mor. 


26.00 


Bangs, April 1901, J mor. 


26.00 


Works: Artists' Edition ' 




Bangs, May 1895, 13 vols. 


24.37 


Bangs, Nov. 1895, 13 vols. 


58.50 


Libbie, Feb. 1897, 13 vols. 


22.75 


Levy sale, 1903, 3 vols., J levant 


66.25 


Anderson, May 1903, 13 vols. 


24.00 


Goodwin sale, 1903, 15 vols., levant; autograph 




letter inserted 


240.00 


Ruppert sale, 1904, 15 vols, in 30, § levant 


55.50 


Soundings from the Atlantic 




Foote sale, 1894; autograph letter inserted 


7.00 


Bangs, April 1897 


2.25 


Arnold sale, 1901 


1.12 


French sale, 1901 


3.00 


Bangs, Oct. 1901; autograph letter inserted 


8.00 


Appleton sale, 1903 


3.00 


Anderson, April 1905 


4.75 


Humorous Poems, 1865 




Foote sale, 1894 


3.50 


Libbie, April 1897 


3.50 


Peirce sale, 1903 


4.50 


Brandon sale, 1906 


3.25 


Pyser sale, 1906; "original paper covers" 


9.00 



[302] 
MANUSCRIPTS 

Dr. Holmes said more than once that his autographs were 
likely to be so common that they would have little value. The 
following list seems to prove that he was mistaken; but it should 
be said that, for lack of space, the compiler has been compelled 
to omit the record of sales of many letters at prices ranging from 
$1.00 to $3.00. They were, in most cases, letters which derived 
no added value from their subjects or from the eminence of the 
persons to whom they were addressed. Such notes as the com- 
piler has been able to collect concerning the original mss. of any 
of Dr. Holmes's works will be found in connection with such 
works respectively. 

Letter of sympathy to James R. Osgood, 1885. 

Bangs, March 1896 $6.25 

Letter of 3 pages, Dec. 29, 1846. " Very interesting 
personal and literary letter." 
Bangs, March 1896 37.00 

Autograph ms. of lecture on the Hahnemann Medi- 
cinal System, 2 pages. 
Bangs, April 1899 3.25 

Letter of 2 pages, dated Jan. 14, 1886, with 2 stanzas 
of "The Pilgrim's Vision." 
Stryker sale, 1901 12.50 

Letter unsigned, 2 pages, dated July 3, 1869, to R. C. 
Waterston. 
Arnold sale, 1901 12.00 

Letter, 3 pages, dated July 5, 1866, to R.C.Winthrop. 

Arnold sale, 1901 6.00 

Letter to Houghton, Osgood & Co., Oct. 18, 1879, 
about a sketch of his life being prepared by Ray 
Palmer. 
Arnold sale, 1901 32.50 

Letter, 4 pages, dated Dec. 29, 1855, referring to his 
address before the New England Society, Dec. 23, 
and discussing his views on slaveiy. 
French sale, 1901 12.00 

Resold at Bangs's in June 1902, for $13.00. 



[ 303 ] 

Autograph stanza, beginning " Lord, let War's tem- 
pests cease," 7 lines, signed, dated April 21, 1882. 
Bangs, May 1902 $13.50 

Autograph stanza of " Union and Liberty,'* 10 lines 
signed and dated. 
Bangs, May 1902 14.00 

Letter of 2 pages, dated March 15, 1860. 

Peirce sale, 1903 10.00 

Letter of condolence to John S. Dwight on the death 
of Mrs. Dwight, 6 pages, dated Nov. 11, 1860. 
Alexander sale, 1902 17.00 

Letter to John G. Whittier, expressing pleasure at 
having received an appreciative letter from him, 4 
pages, dated March 5, 1870. 
Whittier sale, 1903 230.00 

Letter to John G. Whittier, 4 pages, dated Oct. 18, 
1881, endorsed " O. W. Holmes " in Whittier's hand. 
Whittier sale, 1903 60.00 

Letter to Edwin P. Whipple, 3 pages, dated Nov. 16, 
1880. 
Whipple sale, 1903 56.00 

Autograph stanza, 4 lines, from the " Army Hymn," 
signed, dated Nov. 28, 1864. (The hymn was writ- 
ten in 1861.) 
Gilsey sale, 1903 10.50 

letter to George Bancroft, asking him to read " The 
Chambered Nautilus," 3 pages, dated Boston, 
Dec. 1864. 
Williamson sale, 1904 19.50 

Letter to Mrs. Lander, the actress, after seeing a per- 
formance of "The Scarlet Letter." 
Beck sale, 1905 22.00 

Resold by Merwin-Clayton Co. in Oct. 1906, for $15.00. 
Autograph ms. of the last stanza of "The Cham- 
bered Nautilus," signed with full name, and dated 
July 19, 1890, together with letter of same date, 
inclosing it. 
Wilson sale, 1905 23.00 



APPENDIX 

The following pages contain such notes and memoranda as 
came to the compiler's knowledge only when it was too late to 
place them where they belong. In one or two instances, place 
has been made for an important item in the body of the book, 
by relegating one of less importance to the Appendix. 

Page 3 

The "Address for the Opening of the Fifth Avenue Theatre" 
was spoken by Miss Fanny Morant, down to the passage 
beginning 

"Behold the offspring of the Thespian Cart;" 
the remainder by Mr. Frank Hardenberg. It has been printed 
twice in the publications of the Dunlap Society, viz: — 

No. III. Opening Addresses, Laurence Hutton, editor, 1887, 
pp. 128-133. 

No. Xn. Occasional Addresses, 1773-1890, L. Hutton and 
W. Carey, editors, 1890, pp. 102-107. 

Page 12 

Boston Common 

In the "Boston Common" leaflet, the poem is printed on 
the inside pages, in facsimile of Dr. Holmes's original ms., 
signed by him, and dated Nov. 14, 1859. There is a notice of 
copyright by F. H. Underwood, 1859. 

Page 16 

Choose You this Day whom Ye will Serve 

Written in 1862, at the request of Rev. Thomas Starr King, 
of California, "to finish off the lecture he had devoted to me." 
Holmes to Motley, Dec, 1862, quoted in Morse's Life and 
Letters, vol. ii, pp. 170-171. 

Page 33. 

" * How Came I here? ' The Portrait thus might speak " 
The following lines were printed in the Boston Medical and 



[306] 

Surgical Journal, May 5, 1892, vol. 126, pp. 451-452. They 
were read by Dr. Holmes in reply to the poem with which Dr. 
S. Weir Mitchell accompanied the presentation of Mrs. Whit- 
man's portrait of Holmes to the Philadelphia College of Physi- 
cians. 

"How came I here?" The portrait thus might speak. 
The crimson manthng in its canvas cheek; 

"Here in this concourse of the grave and wise 
Who look upon me with inquiring eyes, 
As on some homeless wanderer, caught astray ? 
An error lod, Boerhaave would say. 
Is this great hive of industry my home ? 
Where is the Common ? Where my gilded dome ? 
Where the Old South? The frog pond? Most of all. 
My sacred temple. Freedom's Faneull Hall ? " 

No answer comes; no trick of human art 
Can force those fixed, unmoving lips apart. 
He whom the picture shadows must explain 
This lawless inroad on a strange domain. 
Were it my votive offering, meant to show 
My grateful sense of all the debts I owe 
To your fair city, its unlooked-for face 
Might find no caviller to dispute its place. 
Yet though the friendly offering is not mine 
It bears my benediction to the shrine 
Where, if it meets a welcome, longer yet 
Will stretch the column which displays my debt. 

Friends of my earlier manhood, ever dear. 
Whose lives, whose labors all were centred here. 
How bright each figure stands before me now 
With eyes undimmed and fair unwrinkled brow. 
As when, with life before us yet untried. 
We walked the "Latin Quarter" side by side. 
Through halls of death, through palaces of pain 
That cast their shadows on the turbid Seine. 

When o'er our coffee, at the old "Procope," 
Smiling, we cast each other's horoscope. 
Daring the future's dubious path to scan, 
Gerhardy your Gerhard was the coming man. 



[307] 

Strong-brained, strong-willed, inquiring, patient, wise. 

He looked on truth through achromatic eyes: 

Sure to succeed, for Nature, like a maid. 

Loves best the lovers who are not afraid. 

Lends them her hand to lead them where they please. 

And trusts them boldly with her master-keys. 

Behold, unfading on the rolls of fame 

Typhus and Typhoid stamped with Gerhard's name. 

Look on the stately form at Gerhard's side. 

He, too, shall live to be his city's pride. 

Tall, manly, quiet, grave, but not austere, 

Not slow of wit, a little dull of ear, 

Him we predestined to the place he won, — 

NorriSy the Quaker City's noble son. 

Armed with the skill that science renders sure. 

His look, his touch, were half his patient's cure; 

What need his merits I should further tell ? 

His record stands; your pages know it well. 

Still wandering, lonely, mid the funeral urns. 

To one loved name my saddening thought returns. 

Less to the many known, but to the few, 

A precious memory, — Stewardson, to you. 

Through many a league we two together fared. 

The traveller's comforts and discomforts shared. 

When hills and valleys parted distant towns. 

Long ere the railway smoothed their ups and downs. 

In all the trials wearing days could bring 

No fretful utterance ever left its sting: 

Pity it was that, chased by pallid fears, 

He walked in shadow through his morning years. 

Talked of his early doom, and then, and then 

Lived on, and on, past three score years and ten. 

Too shy, perhaps too timid, for success, 

He fought life's battle bravely not the less. 

Others left prouder memories, none more dear; 

For those a sigh, for Stewardson a tear! 

Well, years rolled on, we went our several ways 
Not unrewarded with our meed of praise; 
Time took the weight and measure of our brains 



[308] 

Set us our tasks and paid us for our pains. 

At length (our side-locks fast were turning gray) 

He brought our art that all-important day 

When here our JEsculapian Congress met 

(Its second gathering, you will not forget). 

I with the crowd your far-famed city sought, 

Pleased to behold the schools where Rush had taught. 

Where Wister labored and where Homer led 

His thirsting flock to Surgery's fountain-head. 

What kindly welcome with the rest I shared; 
A little pleased — perhaps a little scared. 
When Chapman hugged me in his huge embrace 
With praise that lit a bonfire in my face — 
When Francis y guest at MitchelVs generous board, 
My humble name across the table roared. 
Coupled with one which figures on the roll 
Of England's poets — bless his worthy soul! 
Garth — good Sir Samuel, whose poetic spark 
Scarce seen by day, still glimmers in the dark. 
These flitting phantoms of the past survive. 
While grateful Memory keeps her fires alive. 
Friends of the days that fear and anguish knew 
My heart records a deeper debt to you. 

To this kind refuge hallowed evermore, 
Her shattered sufferers fond affection bore. 
Full many a father tracked his bleeding son 
Fresh from the murderous conflict, lost or won. 
Strayed through some quiet ward, and looking round. 
In pity's sheltering arms the lost was found. 

Enough! Enough! these eyes will overflow 
In sweet remembrance of the debt I owe — 
A debt 't would bankrupt gratitude to pay — 
But Heaven perhaps will hear me when I pray: 
Peace to your borders! Long may Science reign 
Supreme, unchallenged o'er her old domain! 
While sons as worthy as their sires of old 
Her borrowed sceptre still unbroken hold. 
Till a new Rush arise who dares to think — 
An unborn Leidy finds the missing link. 



[309] 

Page 43 
Lines written at Sea 
American Monthly Magazine, Feb., 1836, vol. 7, pp. 183- 

184. 
Printed in Poems, 1836, under the title "An Evening 
Thought." 

Page 58 

Poem at the Dedication of the Halleck Monument 

The pamphlet of 1869 is rare. It was used as copy for a por- 
tion of a later pamphlet, printed in 1877, at the time of the dedi- 
cation of a memorial to Halleck in Central Park, N. Y. 

Page 64 

*A Rhymed Riddle 
Fair Words (published in aid of the St. Luke's Home for 
Convalescents, Florence Street, Boston, at Horticultural 
Hall, Boston, Feb. 14, 1876), p. 12 (4to, double column). 

"I'm going to blanJcy'^ with faihng breath, 

The fallen gladiator said; 
Unconquered, he "consents to death;" 

One gasp — the hero soul has fled. 
f "I'm going to blank,** the school-boy cried; 

Two sugared sweets his hands display, — 
Like snow-flakes in the ocean-tide 

They vanish, melted both away. 
Tell with one verb, or I '11 tell you. 

What each was just about to do. 

On the copy in the Boston Athenaeum is pasted a tiny slip 
from the Daily Advertiser, bearing these Hnes: — 

"Succumb," the gladiator groans, 

And breathes away his life with moans; 

"Suck 'em," the schoolboy cries in glee — 

You need n't. Doctor Holmes, tell me. — Sucker. 

Page 68 
* Sceptres and thrones the morning realms have tried 
The Washington Centenary, celebrated in New York, April 
29, 30-May 1, 1889. (Library of Tribune Extras, vol. i, 
no. 5, May, 1889.) 



[310] 

In the account of the banquet, the thirteenth toast — The 
President of the United States — to which President Harrison 
responded, has these Hues printed below, motto-wise. They 
were presumably written for the occasion, but have not been 
reprinted. 

Sceptres and thrones the morning realms have tried; 
Earth for the people kept her sunset side. 
Arts, manners, creeds the teeming Orient gave; 
Freedom, the gift that freights the refluent wave. 
Pays with one priceless pearl the guerdon due. 
And leaves the Old World debtor to the New. 

Long as the watch-towers of our crownless Queen 
Front the broad oceans that she sits between. 
May her proud sons their plighted faith maintain. 
And guard unbroken Union's lengthening chain, — 
Union, our peaceful sovereign, she alone 
Can make or keep the western world our own! 

Page 71 

*Song of Welcome 

In the pamphlet described, Dr. Holmes's name is not men- 
tioned as the author of the poem. His authorship was first pub- 
licly announced in the Annual Report of the Boston School 
Committee for 1864, p. 202, where the poem is reprinted. 

Page 116 
* Tribute to the Memory of Bayard Taylor. Read at a 
memorial meeting in Boston, Jan. 10, 1879. 

Life, Travels and Literary Remains of Bayard Taylor, by 

R. H. Conwell, 1879, pp. 325-326/ 
The ms. of this address is owned by Mr. S. H. Wakeman. 

Page 130 

The Poem for the Dedication of Pittsfield Cemetery was 
printed with the Address delivered by Rev. Henry Neill on the 

^ In this volume the date of the meeting is not given, and the address 
is preceded by: "Dr. Holmes's address was nearly as follows." 



[311] 

same occasion. The publication containing them is found in the 
following forms. 

1. An Address by Rev. Henry Neill, and A Poem by Oliver 
Wendell Holmes : Delivered at the Dedication of the Pittsfield 
(Rural) Cemetery, September 9th, 1850, with other matter, 
and a Map of the Grounds. By the Committee of Publication. 
Pittsfield, Mass. : Axtel, Bull and Marsh. . . . Printers. 1850. 

In this form the historical summary and proceedings fill pp. 
1-22, followed by "Memorials for the Dead'* (the Address and 
Poem), on pp. 23-60; then come 4 pages of miscellaneous verse 
and a plan of the cemetery. A lithographed plan precedes title. 

2. The title-page is the same as in number one, except that?^ 
the words "with other matter, and a Map of the Grounds" 
are omitted. The contents consist of the Address and Poem 
only, on pp. 1-35, the first 3 pages being unnumbered. 

Mr. P. K. Foley, to whom I am indebted for the description 
of number two, advises me that he has a copy (a " presentation 
copy "from Mr. Neill), handsomely bound, and containing only 
the Address and Poem, with the pagination of number one, 
the preliminary matter and the pages beyond 60 having been 
removed. This would, as Mr. Foley suggests, seem to prove 
that the longer pamphlet was issued before the other, as Mr. 
Neill would naturally have chosen for presentation an unmuti- 
lated copy if there had been such an one in existence. 

Page 180 

Lecture — 1863. Private Copy. Boston, 1863. 

4to, blank paper covers; 6 copies printed. 

There is no indication of the occasion on which, or of the 
place where, this lecture was delivered. It is historical in its 
nature, and opens thus: — 

"A great change has taken place within the last two or three 
years, in the relations of our people and nation to the dynasties 
of the old world, especially to the predominant power of Eng- 
land. The change is the last of four stages." These stages are 
— First, Religious Independence; Second, Political Independ- 
ence: Third, Movement towards Industrial Independence; 
Fourth, Rapid Growth of Intellectual Independence. 

For his knowledge of this and the following item the compiler 
is indebted to Mrs. J. C. Chamberlain of New York. The copy 
in the collection of the late Mr. Chamberlain (bound in half- 



[ 312 ] 

morocco, original wrappers bound in) has on the first page, in 
Dr. Holmes's hand: "One of six Copies printed." It brought 
$15.50 at the sale of the library of George Livermore, Esq., in 
1894, and was resold by the purchaser, Mr. Chubbuck, at the 
French-Chubbuck sale in 1904, for $112.00. 



New England's Master-Key. Boston, 1864. 
4to, blank paper covers ; 6 copies printed. 

Again, there is no indication of the place of delivery of the 
lecture; but it has at the end a date, Nov. 8, 1864. The theme is 
the advantage of specialization in making a success of life, and 
"New England's Master-Key" is defined as the specialization 
of intellectual labor. After citing examples of persons who 
devoted their lives to doing one thing thoroughly, — Prescott, 
Motley, AUibone, Worcester, Webster, Audubon, etc., — Dr. 
Holmes closes thus: "Nothing has been done in New England 
that may not be done elsewhere. Take our key, then, brothers 
and sisters of Kansas, of Florida, of Arizona, and open the gates 
of progress for yourselves. . . . But this mighty nation can 
never forget its own peculiar task. There is one question in 
religion; there is one great question in government. The old 
world has failed to answer either; the new world must try to 
answer both!" 

The late Mr. Chamberlain's copy (half morocco, original 
covers bound in) bears this inscription on the first page: "One of 
six copies printed. O. W. Holmes." It brought $16.00 at the 
Livermore sale, and $110.00 at the French-Chubbuck sale. 

Page 192 
A Mortal Antipathy 

In the opening paper of The New Portfolio, Dr. Holmes said, 
referring to the founding of the Atlantic : "I . . . won- 
dered somewhat when Mr. Lowell urged me with such earnest- 
ness to become a contributor," etc. Whereupon Lowell wrote 
from London: "The first number of your New Portfolio whets 
my appetite. Let me make one historical correction. When I 
accepted the editorship of the Atlantic, I made it a condition 
precedent that you were the first contributor to be engaged." 
As a consequence of this " historical correction," when The 
New Portfolio was issued in book form, as A Mortal Antipathy, 



[313] 

tbe passage quoted was so changed as to read: "I wondered 
somewhat when Mr. Lowell insisted upon my becoming a con- 
tributor." See Scudder's James Russell Lowell, vol. i, p. 413. 

Page 255 
Charles D. Meigs, M. D. 

The passage on page 113 of Dr. Meigs's bpok reads thus: — 
**Or shall we rather disregard the jejune and fizenless dream- 
ings of sophomore writers, who thunder forth denunciations, 
and would mark, if they might, with a black and ineffaceable 
spot, the hard won reputation of every physician, who, in the 
Providence of God, is called upon to contend with the rage of 
one of the most destructive of epidemics, and pay an ungrateful 
service, indispensable to the victims it is allowed to attack, and 
with the propagation of which they have no more to do than 
with the propagation of cholera from Jessore to San Francisco, 
and from Mauritius to St. Petersburg." 

See also Copland's Medical Dictionary, 1845, pp. 558-560; 
and the Fifth Annual Report of the Registrar General of Births, 
Deaths, and Marriages in England, 1843, pp. 187-189. 



In the Memoirs of "Malakoff," Extracts from the 
Correspondence and Papers of the late William Edward 
Johnston, edited by R. M. Johnston (London, Hutchin- 
son & Co., 1907), there is printed a poem called "A 
Battle-Hymn in Honour of Sir John Heenan," which was 
printed, soon after the famous Heenan-Sayers prize-jSght 
in 1860, in the New York Times, over the initial "W." 
This poem is attributed by Mr. Johnston to Dr. Holmes ; 
but the compiler is informed by the editor of the Times 
that it was written by Mr. Charles Henry Webb, author 
of Vagrom Verse, etc. 



ADDITIONS TO THE CHRONOLOGICAL LIST 
OF SINGLE PUBLICATIONS 

The Autocrat of the Breakfast-Table. With 
Introduction by G. A. Sala. London, Ward, 
Lock & Tyler, 1865. 
8vo, pp. iv, US, 
Sixpenny Volume Library. 

The Same. London, S. O. Beeton, 1868. 
8vo, pp. vii, 279. 

The Same. Author's Unabridged Edition. Lon- 
don, George Routledge & Sons, [1868.] 
8vo, pp. iv, 123. 

World-Wide Library. 

Other editions of the "Autocrat "were issued by Messrs. 
Routledge in 1884, and 1886 ("Camelot Classics"). 

Yankee Drolleries. The most celebrated works 
of the best American humorists. Complete 
editions, with introduction by G. A. Sala. 
London, 1870. 
3 vols., 8vo. 

The "Autocrat" is included in vol. iii (called "A Third 
Supply") and the "Professor" in vol. ii. The contents of 
the volumes range from specimens of Josh Billings to 
"The Biglow Papers." Each work is paged separately. 
The paper and press-work are very bad. 

The Autocrat, etc. Introduction by G. A. Sala. 
London, George Routledge & Sons, 1893. 
16mo, pp. 315. 

The Same. Introduction by Andrew Lang. Lon- 
don, Ward, Lock & Co., 1896. 
8vo, pp. XX, 331. 
XlXth Century Classics, Clement K. Shorter, editor. 



[315] 

Among their numerous reprints of Dr. Holmes's works, 
Messrs. Routledge seem to have issued in 1882, and again 
in 1888, an edition of The Breakfast-Table Series, in 3. 
"parts," with introduction by G. A. Sala. The issue of 
1888 is included in Routledge's Popular Library of 
Standard Authors. 

The Professor at the Breakfast-Table. 
Selections. With Introduction by H. R. 
Haweis. London, George Routledge & Sons^ 
1886. 

16mo, pp. 158. 
Routledge's World Library. 

The Same. London, George Routledge & Sons, 
1893. 

16mo, pp. 315. 

Elsie Venner. London, Routledge^ Warne & 
Routledge, 1861. 
8vo, pp. 428. 

"Reprinted from the Atlantic Monthly, where it ap- 
peared as 'The Professor's Story.'" 

The Same. London, Routledge, Warne & Rout- 
ledge, 1861. 
8vo, pp. 376. 
Parlour Library, vol. 247. 

The Same. Boston, James R. Osgood & Co,, 
1869. 
8vo, % vols, in 1. 

The Same. New Edition. London, George Rout- 
ledge & Sons, 1886. 
8vo, pp. 148. 

The Same. Edinburgh, W. Paterson, [1888.] 
8vo, pp. 362. 



[316] 

The Same. London, George Routledge & Sons, 
1890. 
8vo, pp. 376. 

The Guardian Angel. London, Ward, Lock & 
Tyler, 1868. 
2 vols., 8vo, pp. 318, 
Library of Popular Authors. 

The Poet at the Breakfast-Table. London, 
George Routledge & Sons, 1872. 
8vo, pp. 370. 
Reissued in 1884. 

The Same. London, John Camden Hotten, 
74 & 75 Piccadilly. [1872.^] 
2 vols., 32mo, paper. 

The Same. "London, Walter ScoU. [1889.] 
12mo. 

Camelot Series. Uniform with "Autocrat" and 
"Professor." 

The Same. London, George Routledge cfe Sons, 
1893. 

16mo, pp. 315.^ 

A Mortal Antipathy. London, Sampson 
Low & Co,, 1885. 
8vo, pp. 14. 
Contains the "Postscript" only. 

* The brief descriptions of the editions consigned to the Appendix are 
taken from the Catalogue of Printed Books in the British Museum, and 
the volumes themselves have not been examined. It is noted here as a curi- 
ous fact that Messrs. Routledge seem to have published in 1893 editions of 
the "Autocrat," "Professor," and "Poet," each containing 315 pages! 



INDEX 



INDEX 

After Our Hundred Days, 59, 194. 

Agnes, 138 n. 

Amateur, The, 204-205. 

American Academy of Arts and Sciences, Proceedings of, 97, 112, 

255. 
American Medical Association, 131. 
American Monthly Magazine, 24, 31, 41, 55, 64, 309. 
Appleton, Thomas G., 92. 
Astrsea, the Balance of Illusions, 129, 234. 
Atlantic Ahnanac, The, 1868, 113; 1869, 116. 
Atlantic Monthly, founding of, 236, 312. 
Autocrat, The, Gives a Breakfast to the Public, ms. of, 97. 
Autocrat of the Breakfast-Table, The, I (1831-1832), 79, 80, 96. 
Autocrat of the Breakfast-Table, The, list of poems in, 96-97; 

translation of, 171. 
Avis, ms. of, 9, 97. 

Battle Hymn, A, 313, 

Beecher, Henry Ward, 106. 

Benefactors of the Medical School, The, 164. 

Berkshire Festival, Lines recited at, sale of, 42. 

Bibliographies of Holmes, 245. 

Boatswain's Whistle, The, 40, 69. 

Border Lines of Knowledge in some Provinces of Medical Science, 

178. 
Boston Medical Library Association, Holmes Memorial Meeting 

of, 93, 106; Dedicatory Address, 188. 
Brave Old South, The, sales of, 12. 

British Museum, catalogue of printed books in, 153, 314-316. 
Buckingham's New England Magazine, 16, 17, 19, 32, 36, 39, 47, 

60, 70, 79, 80, 85, 99. 117. 
Bums, Robert, 28, 231. 

Chambered Nautilus, The, sales of, 15; ms. of, 303. 

Childs, George W., 59. 

Chimes of Freedom and Union, 206. 



[ 320 ] 

CoUegian, The, 75, 202-204. 

Contagiousness of Puerperal Fever, The, 248 (Cullingworth), 251 

(Hodge), 253 (Kneeland), 255, 313 (Meigs). 
Cry from the Study, A, 226-227. 

Dentistry, The Claims of, 183. 

Dickens, Charles, Song for the Dinner to, sale of, 72. 

Dorothy Q., 18, 104-105. 

Dunlap Society's Publications, 305. 

Elsie Venner, translation of, 100, 178. 

Ether Controversy, The, 228, 229. 

Everett, Edward, Inauguration of, 46; Address of, 89, 137. 

Fair Play, sale of, 66. 

Fair Words, Q5, 309. 

Fifth Avenue Theatre, Address for the Opening of the, 305. 

Forbes, John Murray, 5, 80, 84. 

Gifts of Genius, 10. 

Gleaner, The, 205. 

Griswold, Rufus W., letter to, 77. 

Hall, Marshall, M. D., O. W. H.'s edition of his Principles of the 

Theory and Practice of Medicine, 199. 
Halleck Monument, Poem at the Dedication of, sale of 58, 309. 
Harvard Advocate, 33-34. 

Harvard Club of New York, Annual Dinner of, 1878, 32, 203. 
Harvard Commemoration, 1865, 28. 
Heenan, John C,. 313. 
Holmes Breakfast, 267. 
Homoeopathy and its Kindred Delusions, 256. 

Inevitable Trial, The, 179. 
Iron Gate, The, sale of, 39. 

Jackson, Dr. James, 46, 61, 78, 103, 104. 

Last Charge, The, sale of, 41. 
Last Leaf, The, translation of, 155. 
Laurel, The, 206. 
Leland, Charles Godfrey, 62. 



[ 321 ] 

Lessoffsky, Admiral, entertainment of, in Boston, 71, 310. 
Liverpool Philomathic Society, 113. 
Longfellow, H. W., Journal of, 7, 37, 56, 90. 
Lowell, James Russell, 1819-1891 (poem), sale of, 44. 
Lowell, James Russell, 49 n, 125. 
Lyrics of Loyalty, 206. 

" Malakoff," Memoirs of, 313. 

Massachusetts Historical Society, Proceedings of, 5, 9, 43, 54, 56, 

57, 61, 96, 97, 98, 99, 101, 102, 103, 104, 105, 107, 117, 231, 235, 

256, 272. 
Massachusetts Medical Society, Poem for Centennial Dinner of, 

ms. of, 58; 112, 114. 
Medical Highways and By- Ways, 188. 
Medical Profession in Massachusetts, The, 182. 
Meigs, Charles D., M.D., 313. 
Mercantile Library Reporter, 20-24. 
Morse, John T., Life and Letters of Holmes, 11, 18, 32 n, 50, 63, 

90, 92, 125, 226, 236, 243, 255, 256, 266, 305. 
Mortal Antipathy, A, 312. 

Napoleon, Prince, 89, 137. 
Naushon Island, 40, 41, 84, 207-208. 

New England Society in New York, 69, 108, 164, 229, 230-231, 
302. 

Old Ironsides, ms. copies of, 51. 

Old Player, The, 270. ^ 

Our Daily Fare, 36, 60, 229-230. 

Our Yankee Girls, sales of, 55. 

Over the Teacups, list of poems in, 109. 

Pansie (Nath. Hawthorne), 101. 

Parkman, Dr. George, biographical sketch of, 164. 

Phillips Academy, Andover, 27, 114, 232. 

Pictures from Occasional Poems, 1850-1856, 20-24. 

Pierce, John, Diary of, viii, 43, 57, 61. 

Pittsfield Cemetery, Poem for the Dedication of, sale of, 59; 310. 

Poet among the Hills, The, 14, 19, 25, 58, 87, 113, 115, 136, 244. 

Poet at the Breakfast-Table, The, list of poems in, 110. 

Position and Prospects of the Medical Student, The, 163. 



[ 322 ] 

Professor at the Breakfast-Table, The, 100; list of poems in. 111. 
Prospective Visit, A, 194. 
Punch, poems in, 275-278. 

Rabelais Club, 186-187, 234, 270-271. 

Sargent, John O., 103, 118, 203. 

Scudder, H. E., James Russell Lowell, 236, 313. 

Sewall, Harold Marsh, 113. 

Smith, J. E. A. See The Poet among the Hills. 

Some Stepping-Stones and Stumbling-Blocks in the History of 

Medicine, ms., 188. 
Sparks, Jared, Inauguration of, 68. 
Stafford, Ed., Medical Directions written for Governor Winthrop 

by, 105, 199. 

Teaching from the Chair and at the Bedside, 182. 

**This evening hour," etc., sales of, 78. 

Token, The, 1831, 43; 1833, 57, 62; 1837, 16; 1838, 53. 

Unsatisfied, sale of, 86. 

Vanity Fair, caricature of Dr. Holmes in, 252. 

Visit to the Autocrat's Landlady, A, sale of ms. of, 52. 

Voyage of the Good Ship Union, ms. of, 90. 

Washington Centenary, The, 309. 

Whitman's, Mrsi, portrait of Dr. H., presentation of, to Philadel- 
phia College of Physicians; Dr. H.'s reply to Dr. Mitchell's 
poem, 306-309. 

Whitney, Rev. George, Diary of, viii. 

Youth, sale of, 94. 
Youth's Keepsake, 17, 26. 



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BIBLIOGRAPHY 
OF 

OLIVER 

WENDELL 

HOLMES 

r 

IVES